Promoting STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields by recruiting and training the next generation of aerospace stakeholders.    

Research Seed Grant Award Recipients

The Research Seed Grant Program provides awards to faculty and staff from WSGC Affiliate Member colleges and universities to support individuals interested in starting or enhancing space- or aerospace-related research program(s). The primary purpose of these awards is to help faculty build a research program through pilot studies, site visits or collaboration. The WSGC has served as an excellent forum to bring together investigators from different universities to initiate a research collaboration on topics of mutual interest. The success of this Seed Grant program is measured by the investigator's success in developing or expanding their research program, or forming a collaboration that leads to tangible research results.

The Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium is pleased to announce and congratulate the following recipients of this year's Research Seed Grant Awards.

2013-2014

Matthew Kelley
Concordia University Wisconsin
Research Title
: Undergraduate Research in Astronomy at Concordia University WI
Synopsis: Modeling of radio supernovae is an important step in understanding the stellar evolution of massive stars and provides a perfect opportunity for undergraduate participation in astrophysics.

Lindsay McHenry
UW-Milwaukee
Research Title
: Acidic vs. Neutral Hydrothermal Alteration at Lassen: Potential Mars Analog
Synopsis: We will investigate the alteration products of neutral and acidic hot springs and fumaroles at Lassen Volcanic National Park as a potential analog for deposits studied by Spirit at Gusev Crater, Mars.

Jalal Nawash
UW-Whitewater
Research Title
: Efficiency of Select Solar Cells at High Altitudes Using a Weather Balloon
Synopsis: This project will investigate select solar cells¿ efficiencies at high altitude by using a weather balloon. This project contributes to NASA¿s green aviation goals and leverage existing resources.

2012-2013

Eric Barnes
UW-La Crosse
Research Title:
The Role of Entropy in Dark Matter Simulations
Synopsis: This work aims to increase the dark matter knowledge base by utilizing thermodynamic concepts and techniques.td>

Rex Hanger
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Research Title
: Astrobiology Conference Presentation: Origin of Life from the Top Down
Synopsis: The PI requests funding to support travel for a conference presentation at the biennial, NASA-sponsored Astrobiology Conference on April 16-20, 2012 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Vera Kolb
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Research Title
: Coacervates and their Prebiotic Potential
Synopsis: We propose to study the role of coacervates as prebiotic chemical reactors. Since coacervates are aqueous structures, we shall use examples of organic reactions in water, such as Passerini reaction.

Lindsay McHenry
UW-Milwaukee
Research Title
: The preservation of fumarole deposits at Kilauea: analog for Mars
Synopsis: We seek funds to sample and analyze fumarole deposits from Kilauea, Hawaii as a geochemical, mineralogical, and potentially microbiological analog for similar environments on ancient Mars.

Dale Splinter
UW-Whitewater
Research Title
: Spatial Changes in Stream Flow Conditions: An Upper Midwest Investigation
Synopsis: The PI proposes to reconstruct the most current flood probabilities and recurrence intervals for upper Midwest streams and rivers that have an uninterrupted discharge records greater than 50 years.

2011-2012

Terry Jo Leiterman
St. Norbert College
Research Title:
The Effects of Sedimentation and Particle Shape on Phytoplankton Growth
Synopsis: The growth of phytoplankton is quantified and predicted. Sedimentation and shape is a focus through theoretical and computational math modeling, fluid mechanics experiments, and natural observations.

Shelly Lesher
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research Title
: Study of the Origin of the Elements
Synopsis: The key to understanding the origin of the elements is in the study of the nuclear processes in stars. We propose to study a p-process reaction at the Univ. of Notre Dame.

Dan Negrut
UW-Madison
Research Title
: Towards Billion-Body Dynamics Simulation of Granular Material
Synopsis: This project investigates methods to simulate the dynamics of large mechanical systems using powerful parallel computer architectures. Applications include mobility analysis of the Mars Rover on sand.

Christopher Stockdale
Marquette University
Research Title
: A forensic Exploration of the Late-Stage Evolution of Massive Stars
Synopsis: I will expand my collaborative work studying the late-stage evolution of massive stars. I will be studying the explosive deaths of massive stars and the host galaxies in which they occur.

2010-2011

David Higgs
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Research Title:
Algal Biofuels: Optimization and Genetic Analysis for Biodiesel Production  
Synopsis: Biodiesel from algae can reduce CO2 emission and increase production of sustainable energy. This project addresses questions of how to increase biodiesel and what genetic factors control this.  

Seth King
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research Title
: Development of Zinc Oxide Alloy Nanorods for Photovoltaic Applications  
Synopsis: This project will fabricate zinc oxide alloy nanorods for applications in photovoltaic devices. Development of these materials aims to make photovoltaic devices more efficient and economical.  

Mark Mahoney
Carthage College
Research Title
: Software Evolution and the Moving Picture Metaphor  
Synopsis: To create new and better ways to document the evolution of a software system. With this information, narratives can be created about interesting aspects of a system.   

Shauna Sallmen
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research Title
: Studying Interstellar Shells in our Milky Way Galaxy  
Synopsis: This project will use absorption-line studies of interstellar shells to improve our understanding of their properties, characteristics, and interactions with the surrounding interstellar medium.


2010-2011 Special

Kevin Crosby
Carthage College
Research Title:
Undergraduate Research Partnershipin Space Sciences
Synopsis: The proposed program builds on existing research threads and collaborations to establish a comprehensive undergraduate research program in space systems science at Carthage College.

Eric Gansen
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research Title
: Using Resonant RLC Circuitry to Enhance the Performance of QDOGFETs
Synopsis: The research program is focused on developing a novel read-out scheme for quantum-dot-based single-photon detectors that will enhance their sensitivity and lighten their cooling requirements.

Lindsay McHenry
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Research Title:
Solfatara Alternation of Hawaiian Basalts: Potential Mars Analog
Synopsis: We will study the mineralogy, geochemistry, and microbiology of basalt altered by acid-sulfate fumaroles in Hawaii as a potential analog for the formation of sulfate-rich deposits on Mars.


2009-2010

Eric Gansen

Eric Gansen
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research Title:
Studies of the Effects of Operating Temperature on the Performance of Quantum-Dot-Based Photon-Number-Resolving Detectors
Synopsis: Efficient, photon-counting receivers are a key enabling technology for employing certain photon-counting protocols that can extend the link length of interplanetary and deep-space optical communication systems. QDOGFETs (quantum dot, optically gated, field-effect transistors) combine high efficiency and photon-number-resolving capabilities and are promising detectors for laser-based communications – so called "lasercom". In these structures, a photon is detected when it charges a quantum dot (via an exchange of energy between the photon and an electron in the material) and subsequently alters the electrical characteristics of the surrounding transistor. As a result of this unique detection mechanism, these structures are not only sensitive to single photons of light but can also directly count the number of photons that arrive simultaneously, a capability not exhibited by traditional single-photon detectors such as Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. To date, measurements on QDOGFET single-photon detectors have only been performed at a sample temperature of 4 K. I propose a research plan aimed at the study of the effects of operating temperature on the performance of these unique detectors.

Nadejda Kaltcheva
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Research Title:
The Galactic Bok Globules Revisited
Synopsis: The objective of this proposal is to contribute to the study of one particular type of astronomical objects - the Bok globules. The Bok globules appear as small patches of high obscuration against the star-rich background of the Galactic plane and are most likely the inner dense regions of former giant molecular clouds. The present proposal extends this research toward a careful photometric investigation of stars located at a 2°-vicinity of all 248 known globules (Clemens & Barvainis 1988). The stars will be extracted from catalogs available at the Simbad Astronomical data-base. Although these stars are not located in their immediate peripheries, the research will lead to improved estimates of the distances to the globules and absorption mappings in their vicinities, as demonstrated by Franco (1988) for the field of L1569 nebula. As a result, homogeneous photometric distance estimates and spatial color excess distribution diagrams will be obtained for about ¾ of the globules in the Clemens & Barvainis (1988) catalog.

2008-2009

Rex Hanger
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Research Title:  
Geochemical signature of the Permian-Triassic boundary section, Pine Forest  Range, Northwest Nevada
Synopsis: The Pine Forest Range in Northwestern Nevada contains outcropping strata that are Late Permian and Early Triassic in age. As the largest mass extinction in earth’s history occurred at the end of the Permian (~250 million years ago), the potential exists for detailed study of the remains (sediments and fossils) deposited at this unique event in earth’s history, which may have been caused by an extraterrestrial impact.

Vera Kolb
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Research Title:
   Astrobiological relevance of phenols and their silicates
Synopsis:  We propose to prepare solid silicates of various phenols and to study them by the IR (infra-red) spectroscopy. Phenols are organic compounds that are important in biology, but have only very recently been synthesized in prebiotic manner, under the hydrothermal conditions which are relevant to the prebiotic Earth, and under simulated conditions of the interstellar space, which are relevant for the findings of phenols on meteorites. Solid phenol silicates, which we are proposing to prepare, are ideally suited for the preservation of phenols and their transportation in space. The reflectance IR spectra will tell us if phenols are entombed, covalently bound, or both, in respect to the silicate matrix. This finding will be of the fundamental importance for astrobiology.  Phenol silicates may serve as organic markers on the surface of Mars, for example.

Kerry Kuehn
Wisconsin Lutheran College
Research Title
:   Experimental study of the oblique incidence of a vortex ring on a fluid density interface
Synopsis:  The purpose of this project is to study the dynamics of a fluid vortex ring as it crosses a sharp, gravity-induced density gradient between two fluids.

Sonya Larocque
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Research Title: 
  Analysis of spatial and temporal climate variability in Wisconsin using dendroclimatic records
Synopsis:  This research project aims to reconstruct detailed past climate records and determine the contribution of low to high frequency ocean atmospheric oscillations on the climate of Wisconsin.

Linsday McHenry
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Research Title:
   Authigenic sulfate minerals in basaltic caves at Craters of the Moon National       Monument: A potential Mars analogue
Synopsis:  This project will employ XRD, XRF, SEM, and Electron Microprobe analyses of fresh and altered basalts and sulfate-rich precipitates from caves and lava flows collected at COM. COM basalts are optimal Mars analogues because of their unusually high iron concentrations, and the presence of jarosite and hematite among their alteration products and precipitates.

Asif Rasheed
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Research Title: 
  Nanocomposites for Space Application
Synopsis:  This proposal seeks to study the synthesis of nanocomposites with focus on enhancing carbon nanotube dispersion into the polymer matrix and their use in space related applications. The resulting nanocomposites will be characterized for their electrical, mechanical and thermal properties.

2007-2008

Michael Hencheck
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Research Title:
Variable Star Observation Program
Synopsis: For many of the variable stars known to astronomers, there is a serious shortage of observations carried out over a time period long enough to provide insight into the nature of the variations.  This lack of observational data is not due to any overwhelming difficulty in the observational process or in data reduction, but is a result of the simple fact that the variable objects greatly outnumber the astronomers working in the field.  In fact, the data can be acquired with relative ease by the patient observer possessing a small telescope equipped with a CCD camera.  This project proposes to establish a long-term research program at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay for undergraduates and faculty in the physical sciences.  The project provides for collaboration with professional observatories, recruitment of an undergraduate student with a one-year commitment to the project, initial training in beginning and advanced techniques, identification of significant objects for photoelectric photometry, data collection and analysis of light curves, and opportunities for professional presentations and publications by students and faculty.  It is Hencheck’s hope that this initial one-year program will provide for the establishment of an ongoing program of study and result in at least one completed observational project resulting in publication.

Lindsay McHenry
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Research Title:
Sulfate Diagenesis of High-Fe Basalt at Craters of the Moon National Monument: Analogue for the Origin of Sediments at Meridiani Planum, Mars
Synopsis: McHenry will study the geochemical and mineralogical effects of sulfate diagenesis (weathering) on high-iron basalts at Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho.  Craters of the Moon basalts are similar in composition to Martian basalts, and their weathering over a short time in a volcanic environment could provide a test for one of the proposed origins for the sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks at the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity landing site.  A volcanic origin for these sediments could help constrain the extent, duration, and necessity of liquid water during Mars’ early history.  As water is essential to life on Earth, its long-term presence on early Mars could indicate conditions favorable to the development of life.  In contrast, a volcanic landscape with limited surface water would be less hospitable.
This project will employ X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Fluorescence, and Electron Microprobe analyses of fresh and sulfate-rich altered basalts from caves and lava flows collected at Craters of the Moon.  Craters of the Moon basalts are optimal Mars analogues because of their unusually high iron concentrations, and the presence of jarosite among their alteration products.

Dan Negrut
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Research Title
: Algorithms and Simulation Environment for Multibody Dynamics Analysis
Synopsis: Virtual prototyping, or the use of simulation to understand and optimize system performance well in advance of building hardware prototypes, is a design approach often times embraced due to factors that are economic in nature (shorter design cycles and cost savings).  However, beyond economic factors, this approach is the only feasible way to analyze system behavior for a new Mars rover design, or for a probe that is supposed to land on and explore Venus.  The proposed work aims at enhancing the impact of virtual prototyping through (1) new numerical algorithms and (2) a simulation paradigm shift in multibody dynamics analysis that leverages recent breakthroughs in multi-processor technologies (software and midrange hardware). Together, the two thrusts of this research (new numerical integration techniques and the associated parallel computation support) will yield one to two orders of magnitude reduction in simulation times for large mechanical systems.  For complex multibody systems, this will directly impact NASA’s ability to understand and optimize performance well in advance of building hardware prototypes.

Michael Politano
Marquette University, Milwaukee
Research Title:
The Dependence of the Common Envelope Efficiency Parameter on the Total Mass
Synopsis: Politano will expand the capabilities of the current population synthesis code to include modeling populations of close binary systems that undergo some phase(s) of thermal timescale mass transfer.  The current code is limited to modeling populations containing white dwarfs in which mass transfer occurs on a timescale that is longer than the thermal timescale of the donor star. Incorporating thermal timescale mass transfer into the code will allow Politano to model a wider variety of close binary systems, potentially including systems that lead to neutron star and black hole binaries.  Therefore, the end product of the research is not a “result” based on a set of calculations, but rather an upgraded population synthesis code with greatly expanded capabilities.  The upgraded code will allow Politano to model systems that are of interest to programs such as NSF Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics or NASA Astrophysics Theory.

2006-2007

David Bruning
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Research Title: Stellar Spectral Synthesis For Cool Stars Including Surface Motions
Synopsis: The search for extra-solar planetary systems is currently based upon the detection of a small velocity of the star caused by the planet’s gravitational force. An observer on Earth first sees the star move away from Earth and then toward Earth. These forward and back motions cause a line in the star’s spectrum to shift toward the blue and then toward the red. The amount of shift depends upon the star’s velocity. Jupiter causes the Sun to move about 10 m/s. The hot atmosphere of the star has internal motions that can generate an average line shift of the same magnitude as produced by the planet. As seen in the Sun, if the star is magnetically active, the spectral lines will appear to shift with magnitudes and periods similar to planetary-induced shifts, thus masking the planet’s signal. This project proposes to perform detailed calculations of stellar surface motions and to determine their effects on a star’s spectrum. These calculations require high-performance computers, so a computing cluster will be assembled to serve as a testbed for future calculations.

Prasenjit Guptasarma
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Research Title: Development of Oxide Nanostructures for High Efficiency Solar Panel Applications
Synopsis: The ability to convert solar energy into a form usable by a space vehicle is critical to extraterrestrial exploration because fossil or other fuels are expensive to carry (energetically speaking), and only last a limited period of time. State-of-art spacecraft use solar panels to generate electricity – however, current technologies to convert light into electric power are expensive to manufacture, and relatively inefficient (energy output per light input) under certain conditions such as increased temperatures and lack of direct incident light. In order to consider exploration of the solar system, it is important to substantially increase light conversion efficiency because available solar radiation on a panel diminishes with increasing distance from the Sun. We expect that the support of new and emerging technologies in this direction is a key component of NASA’s space program. It is therefore important to explore alternative technologies and study fundamental mechanisms associated with these ideas.

Vera Kolb
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Research Title: Role of Organic Silicates in the Biomineralization Process
Synopsis: The search for extra-solar planetary systems is currently based upon the detection of a small velocity of the star caused by the planet’s gravitational force. An observer on Earth first sees the star move away from Earth and then toward Earth. These forward and back motions cause a line in the star’s spectrum to shift toward the blue and then toward the red. The amount of shift depends upon the star’s velocity. Jupiter causes the Sun to move about 10 m/s. The hot atmosphere of the star has internal motions that can generate an average line shift of the same magnitude as produced by the planet. As seen in the Sun, if the star is magnetically active, the spectral lines will appear to shift with magnitudes and periods similar to planetary-induced shifts, thus masking the planet’s signal. This project proposes to perform detailed calculations of stellar surface motions and to determine their effects on a star’s spectrum. These calculations require high-performance computers, so a computing cluster will be assembled to serve as a testbed for future calculations.

Matthew Mewes
Marquette University
Research Title:
Analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in the Presence of Lorentz Violation
Synopsis: A project to determine possible constraints on deviations from Special Relativity that may be obtained from current and future observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

Michael Politano
Marquette University
Research Title:
The Dependence of the Common Envelope Efficiency Patameter on the Total Mass and Core Mass of the Giant Star
Synopsis: This proposal seeks to investigate the impact of a variable common envelope efficiency parameter, ?CE, on population models of post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs) and zero-age cataclysmic variables (ZACVs). Building upon prior work that investigated ?CE as a function of secondary mass, here I propose to investigate ?CE as a function of the total mass and core mass of the giant primary star. Two specific questions will be addressed in this investigation: 1) How are the population models of PCEBs and ZACVs affected if ?CE is a different for common envelope evolution involving a first giant branch primary than for an AGB primary; and 2) How are these population models affected if ?CE depends on the density profile in the giant star? A Monte Carlo population synthesis code will be used to calculate the model populations of PCEBs and ZACVs. The majority of close binary stars undergo at least one phase of common envelope evolution. Consequently, the impact of the proposed work will extend well beyond the two specific close binary systems studied.

Martin Rudd
University of Wisconsin-Fox Valley
Research Title:
New Bidentate Ligands for Cadmium Zinc Telluride Synthesis
Synopsis: The new missions that are being planned to Mercury, Mars and the outer planets require a careful balance of spacecraft design (size / weight) and the scientific need for information gathering. The instrumentation will need to be robust and materials for the detectors on board will have to be tested thoroughly. One of the materials being considered and researched for these applications is cadmium zinc telluride, a synthesized semi-conductor. Through this project, I will develop a new organometallic chemistry route for preparing precursors of cadmium zinc telluride, an important material in astronomy and space-based research that is used in detectors of non-visible electromagnetic waves.

Lyndon Zink
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research Title
: Investigation of the NH and ND radicals using laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Synopsis: The object of the proposed research is to investigate the NH and ND radicals using laser magnetic resonance (LMR) spectroscopy in the far-infrared. In addition to obtaining and analyzing their high-resolution spectra, the LMR technique will be used to investigate how these radicals are made. The transition frequencies for these molecular species will be measured with fractional uncertainties of a few parts in 106; this will assist in providing definitive information about their molecular parameters, including their hyperfine splitting.

Michael Zorn
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Research Title
: Anaerobic Photocatalysis for the Conversion of Glycerol, a Biodiesel Synthesis Byproduct
Synopsis: Biodiesel is an alternative fuel that can be made from a variety of natural, renewable resources. The process of making biodiesel from vegetable oil creates a byproduct called glycerol (aka glycerine). It is the glycerol that is the main focus of this proposal. The main objective of this project is to use an advanced technology called photocatalysis to further convert glycerol to a more reduced hydrocarbon form (e.g., methane, ethane, ethene, propane) that can be used to provide additional energy. Experiments are designed to detect, identify, and quantify the gaseous reaction products, evaluate the effect of specific experimental parameters, and study the reaction kinetics.

2005-2006

Benjamin, Robert
UW-Whitewater
Major/Title:  Towards a Galactic Center: Synthesizing Recent Results on Galactic Structure

Domblesky, Joseph
Marquette University
Major/Title:  Aerospace Manufacturing Initiative for Metal Formed Parts

Sorbjan, Zbigniew
Marquette University
Major/Title:  Large-eddy Simulations of Turbulence and Convection on Mars

Stockdale, Christopher
Marquette University
Major/Title:  Radio Transients II: Quasars, Supernaovae & Gamma-Ray Bursters

Wu, Changshan
UW-Milwaukee
Major/Title:  Impervious Surface Estimation using IKONOS imagery

Zhang, Chuanrong
UW-Whitewater
Major/Title:  Quantifying Spatial Uncertainty of Land Cover Classes Derived from Satellite Images using a Markov Chain Approach

Research Infrastructure

Mathieu, Bob
WIYN Consortium
Major/Title:  KittPeak - Telescope

2004-2005

Chen, Franklin M.
UW-Green Bay
Research:  Magnetic Absorbent Structure for Space Expedition
Synopsis:  ...for research of magnetic composites that could be used in numerous applications for space related expeditions and undergraduate educations. Specifically, the proposal calls for designing and engineering magnetic composites to remove toxic contaminants...

Colton, John S.
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research:  Electron spin T1 measurements in GaAs and related materials
Synopsis: : Electron spin flip times in gallium arsenide (GaAs) and related materials will be studied by (a) exciting the material with a circularly polarized laser, then (b) measuring the polarization of the emitted luminescence as a function of time.

Kolb, Vera M.
University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Research:  Prebiotic Significance of the Maillard Reaction
Synopsis: : We propose to study the reaction between sugars and amino acids, so-called the Maillard reaction, from the prebiotic perspective. We shall carry out the reaction and attempt to isolate and identify some of the products, with an emphasis on those that belong to the chemical group of nitrogen heterocycles.

Nellis, Gregory
University of Wisconsin - Madison
Research:  Development of Modeling Infrastructure for Magnetic Refrigeration
Synopsis: : This proposal describes a project that will develop and extend modeling and evaluation tools that can be used to assess and design magnetic regenerator refrigerators (AMRR) for use in a variety of refrigeration applications; including near room-temperature space conditioning...

Petty, Grant W.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Research:  Facility for Measuring Microwave Attenuation in Frozen and Melting Precipitation
Synopsis: : A prototype microwave transmitter/receiver link will be deployed between two buildings in order to measure microwave attenuation by falling snow. Project to serve as demo for future proposal to NASA in support of the Global Precipitation Mission.

Sallmen, Shauna M.
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
Research:  Narrow-band Mapping of Newly Identified HI Shells
Synopsis: : This project will create high-resolution maps of warm hydrogen gas in newly identified shells blown by supernovae and/or stellar winds in order to improve our understanding of the evolution of the interstellar medium.

Stockdale, Christopher
Marquette University
Research:  Radio Transients: Microquasars, Supernovae & Gamma-Ray Bursters
Synopsis: : I am proposing to engage in a research program of radio transient sources with undergraduate students for the summer of 2004, which will evolve into an NSF Career grant application in late July 2005.

Zorn, Michael E.
University of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Research:  Development of Magnetoelastic Resonance-Based Chemical Sensors for the Measurement of Gas-Phase Organic Compounds

2003-2004

Borg, John
Marquette
Research:  Preliminary Investigation of Material Damage as a Result of Space Debris Impact

Chen, Franklin
UW-Green Bay
Research:  Mesoporous and Microporous Materials

Hanger, Rex
UW-Whitewater
Research:  Paleontology of the Permian-Triassic Boundary in Hungary: Biotic Response to an Extraterrestrial Impact Event

Jackson, Michael
UW-La Crosse
Research:  Measurement of Far-Infrared Laser Emissions and Their Use in Investigating Atmospheric and Interstellar Molecules

Majdalani, Joseph
Marquette
Research:  Aeroacoustic Instabilities in Vortex-Driven Rocket Motors

2002-2003

Bishop, Deborah
BTCI
Research
Spectral Regulation of the Lignin Biosynthetic Pathway

Kernozek, Thomas
UW-LaCrosse
Research
Effects of Cardiovascular Fatigue on The Joint Reaction Forces & Torques During Running

LeDocq, Michael
UW-LaCrosse
Research:
  Development of a Space Plasma Wave Research Program at UW-LaCrosse

Majdalani, Joseph
Marquettte
Research: 
Aroacoustic Instabilities in Vortex-Driven Rocket Motors

Zorn, Michael
UW-Green Bay
Research:
  Photocatallytic Oxidation of Gas-Phase Compounds in Confined Areas: Investigation of Multiple Component Systems

2001-2002

Deborah Bishop
University of Wisconsin-Madison/USDA-ARS
Research:
  Spectral Regulation of the Lignin Biosynthetic Pathway

Joseph Domblesky
Marquette University
Research:
  Preliminary Investigation of the FCAW for Space Welding

Bob Klindworth
University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse
Research: 
Study of the Quark Structure of Nuclear Matter

Habib Tabatabai
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Research: 
Experimental Investigation of a New Damage Detection Method for Laminated Composites in Aerospace Structures

2000-2001

Michael Jackson
University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse

Kasi Periyasamy
University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse

David Sarocka
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

1999-2000

Michael Briley
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh
Research:
  Improved Distances to Globular Clusters: A Simultaneous Approach to Baade-Wesselink Methods

Barrett Caldwell
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Research:
  Development of a Space Human Factors Research Gateway

Robert S. Crockett
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Research: 
Center for Reduced Gravity Manufacturing: Research Experiences for Undergraduates

David Goldblum
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Research:
  Long-Term Stability of the Boreal Forest-Hardwood Forest Ecotone on the East Shore

Kenny Hunt
University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse
Research:
  Web-Based Software for the Display and

David Travis
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater
Research:
  A Determination of the Influence of Snow Cover on Atmosphere Temperatures While

Vladislav V. Yakovlev   
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Research: 
Advanced Laser Techniques for Manufacturing Novel Materials for Space Flights