Master of Science in Environmental Science and Policy

Admission Requirements | Degree Requirements | Faculty | Course Descriptions

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay's Environmental Science and Policy program is appropriate for students with interests in the scientific and/or public policy aspects of complex environmental problems. It provides a course of study that prepares its graduates for positions in scientific, technical and administrative organizations and agencies. The program's core focuses on identification and analysis of environmental issues and on developing interdisciplinary approaches and solutions to problems. The program offers three areas of emphasis: Ecosystems Studies, Resource Management, and Environmental Policy and Administration.

Although the areas of emphasis seek to integrate the sciences with policy and administration, students choose to specialize in one depending on future career interests. Each area of emphasis has a practical orientation that involves the student in real world problems and issues rather than presenting theoretical knowledge alone. Each area of emphasis allows for and encourages student flexibility in designing a particular program of study around a core of required courses. A personal program of study, as described below, may also be developed.

The program fits the needs of both part-time and full-time students. Most graduate courses are offered once weekly in the evening or at other times convenient for working individuals. Students benefit from the mix of perspectives and experiences held by participants in courses. Full-time students gain from the practical knowledge of the working professionals, who are in turn challenged by the current theoretical knowledge of those with recent undergraduate degrees. Students like the small class sizes and the close association with faculty. Fully prepared students usually complete the program in two years. Part-time students normally complete the program in four to five years.

The program features a faculty that is widely published in the professional literature, active in externally funded research, and committed to excellence in teaching. The faculty associated with the program firmly believe that environmental policy must be based on good science but also that science is ineffective without sound policy decisions. Close ties exist with national, state and local agencies providing students with opportunities to become engaged with and contribute to meaningful scientific research and policy formulation.

The University offers modern and well-equipped facilities that support research and study in environmental science and policy areas. Computer equipped ecology, engineering graphics and geographic information systems (GIS) laboratories are available. The library collection is strong in all areas of environmental studies, but is particularly so in environmental policy and administration. The library maintains subscriptions to most pertinent journals in science and public policy and administration. Interlibrary loans are easily available from UW-Madison and elsewhere when sources are not available locally.

Areas of Emphasis

One of the primary goals of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay graduate program is to prepare highly skilled and imaginative individuals for middle-management and policy-making positions in government, nonprofit organizations and the private sector. Individuals with such career objectives will focus on environmental policy course work. Another objective of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay graduate program is to prepare technically competent and imaginative individuals for positions in the public or private sectors. Individuals with such career objectives will focus on environmental science course work. Students will be prepared to deal with a variety of environmental problems or to pursue further graduate work in similar or related areas.

Ecosystems Studies

Students who select Ecosystems Studies may address problems of general features of ecosystems such as nutrient regeneration, productivity, or trophic relationships. They can also focus on specific questions such as endangered species, predation and competition. Natural, managed and disturbed ecosystems are examined in classroom and field activities. Studies on aquatic systems take advantage of the University's location on Green Bay, participation in the University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Program, and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity. The University's proximity to large areas of northern forests and the Door Peninsula provides convenient locations for the study of diverse ecosystems.

Resource Management

Students who select this area of emphasis may study concepts of natural resource management, watershed management, or of the handling, processing, treatment and disposal of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes. Emphasis is on evaluating alternative strategies for effective policy implementation and planning for the future. Other studies focus on ground or surface water systems. Principles and techniques of quantitative analysis are applied to problems of supply, distribution and utilization of natural resources and to the optimization of treatment and waste management costs in the context of public agencies, consulting firms and industries.

The Ecosystems Studies and Resource Management areas of emphasis prepare students to:

  • design and conduct scientific investigations;
  • collect, evaluate, and interpret data;
  • make responsible decisions to implement appropriate technologies and strategies to solve environmental problems, and;
  • effectively communicate the results of environmental studies to other scientists, decision makers and the general public.

Graduates typically work as scientists, environmental specialists, or project managers with industry, commercial laboratories, engineering firms, or government agencies, where their work involves analysis, research, consulting, compliance, or enforcement.

Environmental Policy and Administration
Students who select Environmental Policy and Administration study the characteristics and operation of government institutions; organizational policy, design and evaluation; and substantive policies in regulation, environmental protection, science and technology, and energy and natural resources. Courses emphasize environmental problem analysis and planning, policy analysis and formulation, environmental law and implementation, program evaluation, statistical analysis and the application of social science research methods to environmental issues. Studies benefit from interaction with the Center for Public Affairs and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity.

The Environmental Policy and Administration area of emphasis prepares students to:

  • identify and analyze policy-relevant problems of major importance;
  • collect, assess, and interpret policy-relevant data;
  • design, evaluate, and implement strategies and programs for addressing such problems, and;
  • effectively communicate the results of policy analyses and evaluations to diverse audiences, including environmental scientists, policy makers, and the general public.

Graduates typically enter governmental agencies at the national, state or local level, or nonprofit organizations, where their work involves policy analysis, planning, or administration. Some prefer positions in legislative bodies, environmental organizations, or industry where administrative or analytical work is combined with politics, public relations, education or advocacy.

Admission Requirements

Each student's prior academic background is evaluated by a program admissions committee when he or she applies. Admission to the Environmental Science and Policy graduate program requires a student to have completed the equivalent of a basic undergraduate course in statistics and submitted current GRE general test scores. Students with a background in both policy and science will be given preference in admission decisions.

Each area of emphasis requires different skills and preparation; therefore, additional prerequisites vary. Courses appropriate to the area of emphasis or needed to meet requisites of specific courses that a student wishes to incorporate into a plan of study will also be required as described below.

Applicants who do not meet these requirements may be admitted if their academic record, letters of reference, and GRE scores indicate potential for successful completion of the program. However, these students will have additional requirements placed upon them as part of their academic plan to make up any deficiencies.

Degree Requirements

Students who are adequately prepared when they enter the program may earn the degree by satisfactorily completing a minimum of 28 credits of course work, plus a six-credit thesis. Those who lack appropriate prerequisites may need to take additional courses to strengthen their backgrounds. Credits earned in undergraduate courses numbered at the 100- or 200-level cannot be applied toward the graduate degree.

Credit requirements are determined by the student's chosen area of emphasis and program of study. At least 12 credits of 700-level courses must be included. Students develop individual program plans with the assistance and approval of their advisers and graduate committees.

By the time a student has successfully completed 15 credits, usually during the second semester, he or she should have selected a thesis adviser, formed a committee and started to develop a thesis proposal with their assistance. Approval of the thesis proposal places the student in candidacy for the degree. Successful defense of the written thesis and completion of all courses in the student's program plan result in awarding of the degree.

General Core Requirements, 19 Credits

All students matriculated into the Environmental Science and Policy program are required to successfully complete the following set of required core courses (13 credits) and a six-credit thesis.

Complete the following three courses, 7 credits:

  • ENV S&P 701   Perspectives in Environmental Science and Policy, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 762   Graduate Seminar, 1 cr.
  • ENV S&P 763   Seminar in Environmental Science and Policy, 3 cr.

And one of the following environmental science courses, 3 credits:

  • ENV S&P 740   Ecosystems Management, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 743   Landscape Ecology, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 766   Waste Management and Resource Recovery, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 660   Resource Management Strategy, 3 cr.

And one of the following public policy courses, 3 credits:

  • ENV S&P 708   Public Policy Analysis, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 713   Energy, Natural Resources, and Public Policy, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 752   Environmental Policy and Administration, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 578  Environmental Law, 3 cr.

And thesis requirement, 6 credits:

  • ENV S&P 799   Thesis, 6 cr.

Area of Emphasis Requirements

In addition to the general core requirements described above, students will select a program of study from one of the areas of emphasis described below. A fourth option is to develop a "personal program of study" more fitting to the career interest of the student.

Area of emphasis courses (must total at least 15 credits, unduplicated by the program core):

  • Ecosystems Studies, 15-16 credits
  • Resource Management, 15-16 credits
  • Environmental Policy and Administration, 15-16 credits
  • Personal Program of Study, 15 credits minimum

Some undergraduate courses are cross-listed as graduate courses and require only graduate status to enroll. It is strongly recommended that a student speak with the professor assigned to the course prior to enrolling to ensure that the student is adequately prepared to succeed in the course.

Personal programs of study must conform to Environmental Science and Policy program guidelines. Such programs must be filed as a Graduate Student Program Plan and be approved by the student's academic adviser, the Environmental Science and Policy program chair, and the dean of the college of professional and graduate studies. These programs must include the entire 19-credit program core requirements and include a minimum of 34 credits.

It is possible, even necessary depending on area requirements, that students will include one or two four-credit statistics courses in their academic program. In those cases, only seven credits would be needed in one semester which could be satisfied by the Seminars in Ecology and Evolution (ENV S&P 715) or an independent study or internship. If a regular course is selected, the academic program would include a total of 36 credits.

Ecosystems Studies (15 credits minimum)

Emphasis Prerequisites:

(taken elsewhere or prior to entrance)
Students who pursue the Ecosystems Studies area of emphasis are expected to have completed biology courses beyond introductory courses, typically the equivalent to a minor or major in biology. These courses should include an ecology course.

Core Courses:

Complete one of the following science courses, 3 credits:

  • ENV S&P 740   Ecosystems Management, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 743   Landscape Ecology, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 749   Wetland Ecology and Management, 3 cr.

Complete one of the following quantitative courses, 3-4 credits:

  • ENV S&P 755   Environmental Data Analysis, 4 cr.
  • ENV S&P 765   Environmental Modeling and Analysis, 4 cr.
  • MATH 555       Applied Mathematical Optimization, 3 cr.
  • MATH 630       Design of Experiments, 4 cr.
  • MATH 631       Multivariate Statistical Analysis, 4 cr.
  • MATH 667      Applied Regression Analysis, 3 cr.

Additional Courses, 9 credits:
Choose any combination from the courses listed here or above.

General Ecology:

  • ENV S&P 715   Seminar in Ecology and Evolution, 1 cr. (3 semesters - 1 credit each semester)
  • ENV SCI 667   Ecological Methods and Analysis, 4 cr.
  • ENV SCI 668   Ecological Applications, 4 cr.

Aquatic Ecology:

  • ENV SCI 530   Hydrology, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 605   Aquatic Ecology, 3 cr.

Plant Biology and Ecology:

  • BIOLOGY 511   Plant Physiology, 4 cr.
  • BIOLOGY 512   Mycology, 3 cr.
  • BIOLOGY 602   Advanced Microbiology, 4 cr.
  • ENV SCI 520   The Soil Environment, 4 cr.
  • ENV SCI 563   Plants and Forest Pathology, 3 cr.

Animal Ecology:

  • BIOLOGY 553   Invertebrate Biology, 4 cr.
  • BIOLOGY 555   Entomology, 3 cr.

Environmental Policy and Planning:

  • ENV S&P 752   Environmental Policy and Administration, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 522 Environmental Planning, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 650 Advanced Geographic Information Systems, 3 cr.

Resource Management (15 credits minimum)

Emphasis Prerequisites:

(taken elsewhere or prior to entrance)
Students who pursue Resource Management come from a variety of undergraduate disciplines including biology, chemistry, earth science, economics, engineering, environmental planning, environmental policy, mathematics, physics, political science, public administration, and resource management. The appropriate undergraduate course preparation is dictated by the prerequisites to the courses to be included in a program of study and the thesis topic area.

Core Courses:

Complete one of the following science courses, 3 credits:

  • ENV S&P 724   Hazardous and Toxic Materials, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 733   Ground Water: Resources and Regulations, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 766   Waste Management and Resource Recovery, 3 cr.

Complete one of the following quantitative courses, 3-4 credits:

  • ENV S&P 755   Environmental Data Analysis, 4 cr.
  • ENV S&P 765   Environmental Modeling and Analysis, 4 cr.
  • MATH 555       Applied Mathematical Optimization, 3 cr.
  • MATH 630      Design of Experiments, 4 cr.
  • MATH 631      Multivariate Statistical Analysis, 4 cr.
  • MATH 667      Applied Regression Analysis, 3 cr.

Additional Courses, 9 credits minimum:

Choose any combination from the courses listed here or above.

Physical Resources Management:

  • CHEM 602       Advanced Organic Chemistry, 3 cr.
  • CHEM 613       Instrumental Analysis, 4 cr.
  • CHEM 617       Nuclear Physics and Radiochemistry, 3 cr.
  • CHEM 618      Nuclear Physics and Radiochemistry Laboratory, 1 cr.
  • ENV SCI 505   Environmental Systems, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 518   Pollution Control, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 520   The Soil Environment, 4 cr.
  • ENV SCI 523   Pollution Prevention, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 530   Hydrology, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 535   Water and Waste Water Treatment, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 615   Solar and Alternate Energy Systems, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 632   Hydrogeology, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 634   Environmental Chemistry, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 635   Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, 1 cr.
  • ENV SCI 660   Resource Management Strategy, 3 cr.

Biological Resources Management:

  • ENV S&P 740   Ecosystems Management, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 743   Landscape Ecology, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 749   Wetland Ecology and Management, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 669   Conservation Biology, 4 cr.

Natural Resources Analysis:

  • ENV SCI 654   Remote Sensing and GIS, 4 cr.
  • PU EN AF 650  Advanced Geographic Information Systems, 3 cr.

Environmental Policy and Planning:

  • ECON 612      Economics of Sustainability, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 713   Energy, Natural Resources and Public Policy, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 752   Environmental Policy and Administration, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 506 Regulatory Policy and Administration, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 522 Environmental Planning, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 551  Water Resources: Planning, Management, and Policy, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 578 Environmental Law, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 602 Environmental and Resource Economics, 3 cr.

Environmental Policy and Administration
(15 credits minimum)

Emphasis Prerequisites:

(taken elsewhere or prior to entrance)

Students who pursue Environmental Policy and Administration come from a variety of undergraduate backgrounds such as economics, engineering, environmental planning, environmental policy, political science, public administration, sociology, or more traditional science disciplines. The appropriate undergraduate course preparation is dictated by the prerequisites for the courses to be included in a program of study and the thesis topic area. It would normally be expected that students would have the equivalent of one year of undergraduate course work in political science, public administration, or economics.

Core Courses:

Complete all of the following courses, 9 credits:

  • ENV S&P 708   Public Policy Analysis, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 752   Environmental Policy and Administration, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 760   Social Research Methods, 3 cr.

Administrative Organizations and Processes – complete one course, 3 credits:

  • MANAGMNT 753 Organizational Theory and Behavior, 3 cr.
  • POL SCI 610   Intergovernmental Relations, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 514 Administrative Law, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 615 Public and Nonprofit Budgeting, 3 cr.

Public Policy - complete one course, 3 credits:

  • ECON 612      Economics of Sustainability, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 713   Energy, Natural Resources, and Public Policy, 3 cr.
  • POL SCI 516   Congress: Politics and Policy, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 506 Regulatory Policy and Administration, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 522 Environmental Planning, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 551  Water Resources: Planning, Management, and Policy, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 578 Environmental Law, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 602 Environmental and Resource Economics, 3 cr.

Additional Courses:

Choose any combination from the courses listed here or above.

Research Methods:

  • ENV S&P 755   Environmental Data Analysis, 4 cr.
  • ENV S&P 765   Environmental Modeling and Analysis, 4 cr.
  • MATH 630      Design of Experiments, 4 cr.
  • MATH 631      Multivariate Statistical Analysis, 4 cr.
  • MATH 667       Applied Regression Analysis, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 653 Cost-Benefit Analysis, 3 cr.

Environmental Science:

  • ENV S&P 715   Seminar in Ecology and Evolution, 1 cr. (3 semesters - 1 credit each semester)
  • ENV S&P 724   Hazardous and Toxic Materials, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 733   Ground Water: Resources and Regulations, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 740   Ecosystems Management, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 743   Landscape Ecology, 3 cr.
  • ENV S&P 766   Waste Management and Resource Recovery, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 505   Environmental Systems, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 518   Pollution Control, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 523   Pollution Prevention, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 634   Environmental Chemistry, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 635   Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, 1 cr.
  • ENV SCI 660   Resource Management Strategy, 3 cr.
  • ENV SCI 668   Ecological Applications, 4 cr.

Environmental Planning and Geographic Information Systems:

  • PU EN AF 522 Environmental Planning, 3 cr.
  • PU EN AF 650  Advanced Geographic Information Systems, 3 cr.

Faculty

Bacheler, Nathan, Assistant Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology). B.S. (1997) Grand Valley State University;, M.S. (2002) , North Carolina State University; , Ph.D. (2008) North Carolina State University.
Fields of interest: aquatic and fisheries ecology, population dynamics, tagging and telemetry techniques, habitat modeling.

Bauer-Dantoin, Angela, Associate Professor, Human Biology (Neuroscience). B.A. Psychology, Lawrence University; Ph.D. Neuroscience, Northwestern.
Fields of interest: brain mechanics for regulating fertility; hormonal regulation of amphibian development; health implications of exposure to environmental endocrine disrupters.

Caglar, Atife, Assistant Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Mathematics). B.S. (1989), M.S. (1993) University of Ataturk (Turkey); M.S. (1998), Ph.D. (2002) University of Pittsburgh.
Fields of interest: numerical analysis, numerical solution of partial differential equations, computational fluid dynamics, industrial modeling, large-scale scientific computing

Chen, Franklin, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Chemistry). B.A. (1970) National Taiwan University (Taiwan); Ph.D. (1977) Princeton University.
Fields of interest: organic contaminant remediation; rock erosion effects (tidal wave and bubble implosion effects on rock surfaces); mesoporous materials with gas phase contaminant adsorption properties; polymeric electrolytes with potential industrial applications; sonochemistry that may enhance catalytic ability.

Davis, Gregory J., Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Mathematics). B.S. (1981) UW-Green Bay; M.A. (1985), Ph.D. (1987) Northwestern.
Fields of interest: dynamical systems; mathematical modeling of biological and physical systems; cliff swallow-house sparrow species dynamics.

Dolan, David M., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Mathematics/Statistics). B.S. (1971), M.S. (1972) Notre Dame; M.A. (1980) Michigan; Ph.D. (1999) McMaster (Canada).
Fields of interest: statistical applications to ecosystems studies and resource management; spatial statistics; pollutant load estimation; water quality monitoring and modeling.

Dornbush, Mathew, Assistant Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology). B.A. (1998) Augustana College; M.S. (2001), Ph.D. (2005) Iowa State University.
Fields of interest: soil ecology; plant-soil microbial interactions; soil microbial ecology; ecosystem carbon cycling; plant ecology; invasive species; restoration ecology.

Draney, Michael L., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology). B.S. (1989) New Mexico State University; M.S. (1992), Ph.D. (1997) Univ. of Georgia.
Fields of interest: inventory, monitoring and assessment techniques for terrestrial and wetland invertebrates, taxonomy, and conservation of spiders and ground-dwelling arthropods.

Estevez, Jorge, Assistant Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Physics). B.S. (1999) Auburn University; M.S. (2002) University of Minnesota; Ph.D. (2009) University of Minnesota.
Fields of interest: computational chemical physics and molecular modeling; chemical reactions and molecular interactions relevant to the environment, industry, and human health; pollution prevention and remediation; renewable energy; alternative fuels; recycling; energy conservation; material science, biophysics.

Fermanich, Kevin J., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Geoscience). B.S. (1985) UW-Stevens Point; M.S. (1988), Ph.D. (1995) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: nonpoint pollution; soil management; watershed management, groundwater, contaminant fate and transport; vadose zone processes; community environmental monitoring.

Furlong, Scott R., Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Political Science). B.A. (1985) St. Lawrence University; M.P.A. (1987), Ph.D. (1992) The American University.
Fields of interest: regulatory policy; environmental policy; legislative politics; administrative law; public policy and administration; research methods and interest group influence on the administrative rulemaking process.

Howe, Robert W., Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology); Director, Cofrin Center for Biodiversity. B.S. (1974) Notre Dame; M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1981) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: terrestrial ecology and conservation biology; ecological indicators; bird population dynamics; population monitoring; landscape ecology; conservation design residential development; disease ecology; black bear ecology; evolutionary ecology.

Katers, John F., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Engineering). B.S. (1991), M.S. (1993) UW-Green Bay; Ph.D. (1996) Marquette.
Fields of interest: waste management; recycling, pollution prevention, renewable energy, water and waste water treatment.

Kraft, Michael E., Herbert Fisk Johnson Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Political Science). B.A. (1966) UC-Riverside; M.A. (1967), Ph.D. (1973) Yale.
Fields of interest: American politics and government; public policy analysis; Congress; environmental policy and politics in the U.S.; sustainable communities; politics of nuclear waste disposal; business and environmental policy; environmental information disclosure.

Kurenok, Vladimir, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Mathematics). B.S., M.A. (1986) Friedrich-Schiller University in Jena (Germany); Ph.D. (1991) Belarus State University, Minsk (Belarus).
Fields of interest: stochastic analysis and stochastic differential equations; mathematical statistics.

Luczaj, John, Assistant Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Geoscience). B.S. (1993) University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh; M.S. (1995) University of Kansas; Ph.D. (2000) Johns Hopkins University.
Fields of interest: fluid inclusion in minerals; water-rock interaction in sedimentary rock; groundwater contamination; karst geology and hydrogeology; stratigraphy of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

Lyon, John M., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Chemistry). B.S. (1977) Lehigh; Ph.D. (1983) Rutgers.
Fields of interest: transition metal chemistry; catalytic hydrodeclorination reactions; reactions of transition metals in high oxidation states as oxygenation catalysts; photochemical energy conversion systems.

Marker, James C., Associate Professor, Human Biology (Exercise Physiology). B.S. (1979) Weber State University; M.S. (1981) Utah State University; Ph.D. (1985) Brigham Young University; Post-Doctoral Fellow (1985-88) Washington State University of Medicine.
Fields of interest: exercise physiology/endocrinology; the role/response of hormones during exercise; metabolic responses to exercise and exercise training; adaptions to exercise training in the elderly; the role of the sympathoadrenal system and glucose counter-regulatory system during exercise; exercise/muscle physiology; exercise testing and prescription; kinesiology.

Meinhardt, Daniel J., Associate Professor, Human Biology (Biology). B.S. (1992) Southern Illinois University; Ph.D. (2002) University of Kansas.
Fields of interest: evolution and development of invertebrates; the role of development in evolutionary explanation; history and philosophy of evolutionary biology.

Meyer, Steven J., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Geocience). B.S. (1983) Northern Illinois; M.S. (1986), Ph.D. (1990) University of Nebraska.
Fields of interest: climate change; the effects of climate change on natural resources; climate related decision making; long-range climate outlooks and their uses; science education.

Niedzwiedz, William R., Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Geography). B.S. (1969), M.S. (1972) Massachusetts; Ph.D. (1981) Virginia Polytechnic.
Fields of interest: geographic information systems; aerial photo interpretation; coastal management; conservation design of landscapes; environmental impact.

Phoenix, Laurel, Associate Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Planning). B.S. (1992), M.S. (1994) Colorado at Boulder; Ph.D. (2001) SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.
Fields of interest: water resources management; drinking water quality; anti-environmentalism; water and waste water infrastructure; rural environmental planning.

Rinfret, Sara, Assistant Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Political Science). B.A. (2003), Otterbein College; M.P.A. (2005), The Ohio State University's John Glenn School of Public Affairs; Ph.D. (2009), Northern Arizona University.
Fields of interest: regulatory policy with an emphasis on environmental rules, public administration and sustainability, public policy, and environmental and natural resource policy.

Scheberle, Denise L., Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Political Science). B.S. (1982), M.P.A. (1984) University of Wyoming; Ph.D. (1991) Colorado State University.
Fields of interest: environmental policy and law; policy implementation and formation; federal-state relationships in environmental programs; public administration; intergovernmental relations; public policy.

Stoll, John R., Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs (Economics). B.S. (1973) UW-Green Bay; M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1980) Kentucky.
Fields of interest: natural resource and environmental economics; quantitative methods; nonmarket valuation methodology; economics of recreation and leisure; cost-benefit analysis, regional economics, fisheries economics, value of nonconsumptive resource usage.

Terry, Patricia A., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Engineering). B.S. (1989), M.S. (1991) Texas-Austin; Ph.D. (1995) University of Colorado-Boulder.
Fields of interest: general water remediation; environmental separations; ion exchange processes; removal of heavy metals, chromates, phosphates, and nitrates from water.

Wolf, Amy, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Ecology). B.S. (1989), M.S. (1993) UW-Green Bay; Ph.D. (1998) University of California-Davis.
Fields of interest: conservation biology, plant-animal interactions, restoration ecology, plant population ecology, ornithology; pollination ecology of rare plants, butterfly conservation and monitoring, population genetics of rare plants, invasive wetland plants, conservation of native bees.

Zorn, Michael E., Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Chemistry). B.S. (1993) UW-Green Bay; Ph.D. (1997) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: development of photocatalytic and catalytic methods for degradation of environmentally relevant compounds; development of enhancement of experimental methods (including sensors) for the analysis of environmental samples.

Emeriti Faculty

Day, Harold Jack, Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Engineering). B.S. (1952), M.S. (1953), Ph.D. (1963) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: water resources, fluid mechanics, hydrology and related applications of engineering to society and technology; regional water quality and associated land management and flood plain management; resource management.

Harris, Hallet J., Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology). B.A. (1961) Coe College; M.S. (1965), Ph.D. (1966) Iowa State.
Fields of interest: animal and wetland ecology; management of coastal areas; wildlife management; ecological risk assessment.

Moran, Joseph M., Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Earth Science). B.A. (1965), M.S. (1967) Boston College; Ph.D. (1972) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: nature of climatic change, air pollution meteorology; applications of paleoclimatic reconstruction techniques to Glacial-age evidence; environmental implications of current climatic changes; quaternary climatology; geology.

Sager, Paul E., Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology). B.S. (1959) Michigan; M.S. (1963), Ph.D. (1967) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: ecology of aquatic communities including nutrient studies in the phytoplankton of freshwater lakes; eutrophication of lakes; ecological effects of nutrient enrichment and water quality deterioration; limnology.

Stieglitz, Ronald D., Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Earth Science-Geology). B.S. (1963) UW-Milwaukee; M.S. (1967), Ph.D. (1970) Illinois.
Fields of interest: environmental geology; stratigraphic analysis; sedimentary geology; applications of geology to land use problems; ground water resources.

Wenger, Robert B., Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Mathematics). B.S. (1958) Eastern Mennonite; M.A. (1962) Pennsylvania State; Ph.D. (1969) Pittsburgh.
Fields of interest: application of mathematical models to environmental problems such as solid waste management and water quality management; ecosystem risk assessment and graph-theoretic approaches to the study of ecosystem stressors.

Adjunct Faculty

Ditton, Robert, Adjunct Professor, Texas A&M (Wildlife and Fisheries, Recreations and Parks). B.S. (1964) SUNY at Cortland; M.S. (1966), Ph.D. (1969) Illinois.
Fields of interest: coastal resources, human dimensions of resource use, resource management, coastal and inland fisheries, recreation and parks, birding, non-consumptive resource usage. Research has centered upon management of coastal resources including policy, human dimensions of usage, and management impacts. Extensive experience in data collection and analysis using survey techniques.

Katz, Chris, Adjunct Assistant Professor, (Veterinary Medicine). B.S. (1977), D.V.M. (1981) Iowa State.
Fields of interest: Black Bear research, wildlife and exotic pet medicine, wildlife anesthetization for research

Medland, Vicki, Associate Director, Cofrin Center for Biodiversity (Biology). B.S. (1984) UW-Madison; M.S. (1989) New Mexico State University; Ph.D. (1997) University of Georgia.
Fields of interest: wetland ecology, evolutionary and behavioral ecology of aquatic invertebrate and zooplankton.

Meece, Jennifer, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation (Genetics). B.S. (1990) North Dakota; M.S. (1995) Western Illinois; Ph.D. (2002) Notre Dame.
Fields of interest: West Nile Virus research, mosquito ecology, disease transmission.

Reed, Kurt, Adjunct Professor, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation (Pathology). B.S. (1976), M.D. (1980) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: environmental aspects of human health, ecology and transmission of diseases, health histories of human populations.

Reed, Tara, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences (Biology). B.A. (1980) Whitworth; M.S. (1995) Oregon State; Ph.D. (1999) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: impacts of anthropogenic activities and exotic invasions on aquatic ecosystem; changes in the Green Bay ecosystem following zebra mussel invasion; evaluating the changes in macroinvertebrate community structure downstream following dam removal.

Robertson, Dale, Adjunct Associate Professor, U.S. Geological Survey (Hydrology). B.S. (1981) St. Norbert College; M.S. (1984), Ph.D. (1989) UW-Madison.
Fields of interest: physical limnology; water-quality modeling; influence of environmental factors, watershed management strategies, and in-lake management alternatives on the water quality rivers and lakes; ice as climatic indicators; effects of artificial destratification; regional loading estimates; meteorological and lake physical measurements; air-water interactions.

Shukla, Sanjay, Adjunct Associate Professor, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation (Microbiology). B.S. (1982), M.S. (1984) Calcutta; M.S. (1989) North Dakota; Ph.D. (1996) Oklahoma.
Fields of interest: ecology of novel diseases such as West Nile Virus and Lyme Disease, emerging health issues.

Yingst, R. Aileen, Director, Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium (Earth Science-Geology). A.B. (1991) Dartmouth College; M.S. (1995), Ph.D. (1998) Brown University.
Fields of interest: volcanology, geomorphology, planetary geology, spectroscopy, other remote sensing applications, and sedimentary clast morphology.

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