The College of

Science & Technology

Recent Faculty Publications

 
  • Assistant Professor Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Natural and Applied Sciences) has a research article, Bipyridinium and Imidazolium Ionic Liquids for Nanomaterials Synthesis: pH Effect, Phase Transfer Behavior, and Protein Extraction, published in the “ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng.” (ACS journal). Rajni Aggarwal, Poonam Khullar, Divya Mandial, Aabroo Mahal, Gurinder Kaur Ahluwalia, and Mandeep Singh Bakshi. “This manuscript is related to the synthesis, characterization and applications of ionic liquid coated nanomaterials for protein extraction. We show that by carefully selecting the functional group of ionic liquid, it is possible to selectively extract protein fractions from complex biological fluids which are otherwise difficult to separate, with possible ramifications in nano-biotechnology.”
  • Assistant Professor Saeid Amiri, & Dinov, I. D. (2017). msktuple: An Integrated R Library for Alignment-Free Multiple Sequence k-Tuple Analysis. Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems. To appear.
  • Assistant Prof. Mohammad Upal Mahfuz (Electrical Engineering Technology, Natural and Applied Sciences) has recently co-authored a book chapter entitled “Integration of Renewable Energy Resources in the Smart Grid: Opportunities and Challenges” in the book entitled “Transportation and Power Grid in Smart Cities: Communication Networks and Services,” to be published by John Wiley, UK. This recently accepted book chapter has been co-authored by Ahmed O. Nasif (UW-Oshkosh), Md Maruf Hossain (UW-Green Bay) and Md. Abdur Rahman (American International University-Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh). The book editors are Hussein Mouftah, Melike Erol-Kantarci and Mubashir Husain Rehmani. Authors expect the book to be available soon. Prof. Mahfuz’s research interests are available at his website.
  • Professors Amy Wolf and Bob Howe, (Biology) who had their work published in Science, (June 30, 2017) the premiere scientific journal in the world (along with the British counterpart Nature). The work involves a collaboration that includes their research at the Wabikon Forest Dynamics Plot in northern Wisconsin. Read Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale and see the related commentary:
    How latitude affects biotic interactions (Comita 2017, Science)
    Global forest network cracks the case of tropical biodiversity (Washington University in St. Louis)
    Is this the long-sought answer to the question of tropical biodiversity? (Smithsonian News Desk)
     
  • Professor Michael Draney (NAS) along with Canadian collaborator Donald J. Buckle authored the revised chapter on Linyphiidae (the most diverse spider family in North America with 937 described species) for the second edition of “Spiders of North America, an identification manual,” published by the American Arachnological Society. The original 2005 edition included an illustrated key to 157 genera of sheet-web spiders, as Linyphiids are called, and the revised edition has expanded to include all 174 known genera.
  • Professor John Luczaj (Geology, Geoscience) is one of several coauthors of the invited review article “Paleozoic reactivation structures in the Appalachian-Ouachita-Marathon foreland: Far-field deformation across Pangea,” which appears in the June 2017 issue of Earth-Science Reviews, published by Elsevier. The article describes how fold and fault structures in the middle of the continent were influenced by Appalachian Mountain building events on the east coast during formation of the supercontinent Pangea. Full access can be obtained here.
  • Assistant Professor Mandeep Singh Bakshi’s (Chemistry) perspective is published in “Chemical Research in Toxicology” (ACS journal). Nanotoxicity in Systemic Circulation and Wound Healing is related to the recent advances in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology where functional nanomaterials are used as drug delivery vehicles in systemic circulation. A variety of nanomaterials are potentially cytotoxic in the living system and hence, their nanotoxicity is an essential aspect to be discussed. This account highlights the nanotoxic effects of nanomaterials proposed to use in nanomedicine.
  • Assistant Professor M. U. Mahfuz has published two articles in a book: M. U. Mahfuz, D. Makrakis, and H. T. Mouftah, Concentration-Encoded Molecular Communication in Nanonetworks. Part 1: Fundamentals, Issues, and Challenges,” in Modeling, Methodologies and Tools for Molecular and Nano-scale Communications, Eds. Junichi Suzuki, Tadashi Nakano, and Michael J. Moore, Volume 9 of the series Modeling and Optimization in Science and Technologies, pp. 3-34, Springer, March, 2017, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-50688-3_1 and
    M. U. Mahfuz, D. Makrakis, and H. T. Mouftah, Concentration-Encoded Molecular Communication in Nanonetworks. Part 2: Performance Evaluation,” in Modeling, Methodologies and Tools for Molecular and Nano-scale Communications, Eds. Junichi Suzuki, Tadashi Nakano, and Michael J. Moore, Volume 9 of the series Modeling and Optimization in Science and Technologies, pp. 35-56, Springer, March, 2017, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-50688-3_2.
  • Assistant Professor Lisa Grubisha (Biology) recently co-authored two publications. “Increased phylogenetic resolution within the ecologically important Rhizopogon subgenus Amylopogon using 10 anonymous nuclear loci” was published in the journal Mycologia in March 2017. The paper “Development of Anonymous Nuclear Loci for Pterospora andromedea (Monotropoideae) Using Illumina and Ion Torrent Sequencing Data” was published online early in Conservation Genetic Resources in February 2017.
  • Assistant Professor Karen Stahlheber (Biology) co-authored a paper entitled "Livestock Exclusion Impacts on Oak Savanna Habitats—Differential Responses of Understory and Open Habitats" that was published in the Journal of Rangeland Ecology and Management in May 2017.
  • Assistant Professor Md Maruf Hossain’s (Electrical Engineering Technology) co-authored paper entitled “A Signal Reforming Algorithm Based Three-Phase PLL Under Unbalanced Grid Conditions,” was presented in the International Conference on Renewable Energy Research and Applications (ICRERA) on Nov. 20-23, 2016 at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham, UK. The paper is now published in IEEE Xplore.
  • Three peer-reviewed papers authored or co-authored by Assistant Professor Brian Welsch (Physics, Natural and Applied Sciences) have been published over the past 15 months: [1] “Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares,” Y. Fu & B. T. Welsch, Solar Physics, v. 291 p. 383 (02/2016); [2] “Deriving Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms,” B. T. Welsch & G. H. Fisher, Solar Physics, v. 291 p. 1681 (08/2016); [3] “The Roles of Reconnected Flux and Overlying Fields in CME Speeds,” M. Deng & B. T. Welsch, Solar Physics, v. 292 p. 17 (01/2017).
  • Professor John Luczaj (Geology, Natural & Applied Sciences) is a co-author of a recent peer-reviewed work. “Groundwater Management Area, Wisconsin, USA: A Century of Groundwater Use,” published in the journal Geosciences in March 2017.  The article is culmination of 10 years of researching the water levels in the deep sandstone aquifer beneath Green Bay and the Fox Cities.
  • Assistant Professor Georgette Heyrman (Human Biology) just recently coauthored and published an article with Alexandria N. Young-College of Pharmacy, University of Illinios at Chicago, J. Julie Kim-Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago and Joanna E. Burdette-College of Pharmacy, University of Illinios at Chicago titled "Microphysiologic Systems in Female Reproductive Biology" which discusses existing microphysiologic systems technology that may be applied to study of the female reproductive tract, and those currently in development to specifically investigate gametes, fertilization, embryo development, pregnancy, and diseases of the female reproductive tract. We focus on the clinical applicability of these new technologies in fields such as assisted reproductive technologies, drug testing, disease diagnostics, and personalized medicine.
  • Assistant Professor Saeid Amiri (NAS, Statistics) reports the following publications:  Amiri, S., Clarke, B, & Clarke, J. (2017). Clustering categorical data via ensembling dissimilarity matrices. Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. Doi:10.1080/10618600.2017.1305278.
    Ghodsi, M., Amiri, S. Hassani, H., & Ghodsi, Z. (2016). An enhanced version of Cochran-Armitage trend test for genome-wide association studies. Meta Gene, doi:10.1016/j.mgene.2016.07.001.
    Amiri, S. & Modarres, R. (2016). Comparison of Tests of Contingency Tables. Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics. doi: 10.1080/10543406.2016.1269786.
    Amiri, S., Modarres, R., & Zwanzig, S. (2016). Tests of Perfect Judgment Ranking using Pseudo-samples, Computational Statistics, DOI: 10.1007/s00180-016-0698-7.
    Amiri, S. (2016). Revisiting inference of coefficient of variation: nuisances’ parameters. Stat, 5, 234-24. doi: 10.1002/sta4.116.
    Amiri, S., & Dinov, I. D. (2016). Comparison of genomic data via statistical distribution. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 407, 318-327. doi: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.07.032.
    Clarke, B, Amiri, S., & Clarke, J. (2016). EnsCat: Clustering of Categorical data via ensembling, BMC Bioinformatics, 17:380 DOI 10.1186/s12859-016-1245-9. 
  •  Assistant Professor Ryan Currier and Associate Professor Patrick Forsythe (Natural and Applied Sciences) have published an article with former students Corinne Grossmeier, Michael Laliberte and Brian Yagle. “Experiments on the evolution of laccolith morphology in plan-view” presents the results and implications of experiments performed by students in the Fall 2013 Capstone in Environmental Science course, where students simulated the intrusion of magma in the shallow earth by injecting molten wax into layered gelatin. The findings provide an updated model for the growth of shallow intrusions and allow for the prediction of hidden magmatic plumbing based on the shape of an intrusion.
  • Assistant Professor M. Upal Mahfuz (Electrical Engineering Technology, NAS) had his paper “Achievable Strength-based Signal Detection in Quantity-constrained PAM OOK Concentration-encoded Molecular Communication” accepted for publication in the IEEE Transactions on Nanobioscience Journal in November, 2016. 
  • Assistant Professor Md Maruf Hossain (Electrical Engineering Technology, NAS) recently co-authored a paper with undergraduate students from Bangladesh titled, "Grid Frequency Estimation Using Rife-Vincent Class I Window Based Discrete Fourier Transform." It was presented during the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' International Women in Engineering Conference in Prune, India, Dec. 19-21. He is also the co-author of a second paper, "Three-Phase Phase-Locked Loop for Grid Voltage Phase Estimation under Unbalanced and Distorted Conditions," which has been accepted for presentation in the Power and Energy Conference in Champaign, Illinois Feb. 23-24, 2017.  
  • Assistant Professor Megan J. Olson Hunt (Statistics, NAS) recently had a paper, The effect of direction specific thoracic spine manipulation on the cervical spine, co-authored with national and international colleagues, accepted for publication in the Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy. Mixed models were used to analyze repeated measures data in order to compare two therapies aimed at reducing neck pain and disability via manipulation of the thoracic spine.
  • Professor Michael Draney (Biology, NAS) has published two articles produced during his 2015-16 sabbatical, in the journal Southeastern Naturalist. He coauthored “Harvestmen (Opiliones) of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina” with Jeffrey Shultz of the University of Maryland, a world authority on Harvestmen. He coauthored “New records extend the known range of Calymmaria persica (Hentz) (Araneae, Hahniidae)” with Pat Miller from the Mississippi Entomological Museum at Mississippi State University.
  • Associate Professor Franklin M. Chen (Chemistry, NAS)(2016). Modular Approach to Introduce Multivariate Calculus in Thermodynamics Class.   Journal of Chinese Chemical Society, 63, 445-449.
  • Lecturer Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, NAS) published two recent research articles in “ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.” The work highlights the bio-mineralization and sustainability of bio-functional nanomaterials with applications as drug delivery vehicles in systemic circulation. Future pharmaceutical formulations based on bio-nanomaterials will provide effective tools to deal with the critical illnesses in comparison to the conventional time consuming and highly expensive medical procedures. pH Responsive Bioactive Lead Sulfide Nanomaterials: Protein Induced Morphology Control, Bioapplicability, and Bioextraction of Nanomaterials.