Izmir and Ephesus

Steven Dutch, Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Green Bay
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Kucukcekmece Lake
TU Istanbul to Izmir
Buyukcekmece Lake
TU Istanbul to Izmir Flying over haze. The streaks are shadows of clouds. They appear to converge at the point opposite to the sun.
TU Istanbul to Izmir Flying over haze. The streaks are shadows of clouds. They appear to converge at the point opposite to the sun.
TU Istanbul to Izmir Diffraction halo ('specter of the Broken?) around plane's shadow.
TU Istanbul to Izmir Near Bandirma
TU Istanbul to Izmir West of Balikesir
TU Istanbul to Izmir Also W. of Balikesir. "The snow-covered mountain is 6,000-foot Kaz Dage"
TU Istanbul to Izmir Also W. of Balikesir. "The snow-covered mountain is 6,000-foot Kaz Dage"
TU Istanbul to Izmir Delta of the Bakir River
Harbor
Harbor
Harbor
View of Izmir
Kadifekale "The fortress of Kadifekale, dating from Greek and Byzantine days, on a mountain above the city "
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
Kadifekale Sunset views of Izmir from Kadifekale
The Salepcioglu Mosque
The Salepcioglu Mosque
Sadirvan Mosque -1636
Hisar Mosque -1579
Kadifekale "View of the three mosques from Kadifekale, the first on the left, the next on the right, and the last above and between the first two. "
Agora Seen from Kadifekale "The Agora, or marketplace dating from about the time of Christ"
Agora Looking toward Kadifekale
Agora Looking toward Kadifekale
Agora General views
Agora General views
Agora General views
Agora View of the underground construction
Konak Square Small mosque in Konak Square "(one of the main squares of the city, on the waterfront)"
Konak Square Clock tower in Konak Square built in 1901
Street scenes
Street scenes
Street scenes
Part of the modern Turkish railroad system (most trains on the Asian side use steam)
"Izmir's modern fire department (one dates from 1878, the other from 1925) "
"Izmir's modern fire department (one dates from 1878, the other from 1925) "
Scenes on the way to Ephesus from Izmir.
Scenes on the way to Ephesus from Izmir.
Scenes on the way to Ephesus from Izmir.
General view of Ephesus. "The city was located beyond the nearer hill, at the foot of the high cliffs. One of the ruins is sunlit and stands out plainly. The old harbor was at the foot of the hill on the far right. The city was abandoned when the harbor filled with silt. At its height, the city had a population of 250,000 (about 50 A.D.)"
Theater "The first thing you see upon entering Ephesus is the theatre, where St. Paul once preached. It held 25,000 people and is still in good shape."
Harbor Street Looking away from the theatre
Harbor Street Looking away from the theatre
Harbor Street Looking toward the theatre
Harbor Street Looking toward the theatre
Agora
Agora
Agora
Agora
Agora
Agora
Temple of Serapis Ruins
Library of Celsus
"View of Marble Street, seen from the Library "
"Now here's a place no town should be without. (Read the sign?it says the same thing in English, Turkish, and German) "
"Inside, there are some pretty, inlaid stone floors. "Now you can tell everyone your son went into a house of ill repute on Christmas Eve! Where is the place? Right across the street from the Library!
Looking up Curietae Street from the library
Looking up Curietae Street from the library
The Baths of Skolastica Right next door to (and part of) the brothel. Skolastica saw to it that her customers got taken to the cleaners in a variety of ways!
The Baths of Skolastica Right next door to (and part of) the brothel. Skolastica saw to it that her customers got taken to the cleaners in a variety of ways!
Also part of the baths Probably part of the heating system
The temple of Hadrian
The temple of Hadrian
A hotel across the street from Temple of Hadrian
A hotel across the street from Temple of Hadrian
A hotel across the street from Temple of Hadrian
The Fountain of Trajan
The Fountain of Trajan
Looking back down Curietiae Street
Looking back down Curietiae Street
Looking back down Curietiae Street
Temple of Domitianus
Ruins of the Great Fountain
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus "Including the city hall, a concert hall and a marketplace. Note the mosaic and inlaid-stone floors in some of the pictures"
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
Ruins of the municipal buildings of Ephesus
The harbor Baths "Located on the opposite end of the city, near (you'll never guess) the harbor."
The harbor Baths "Located on the opposite end of the city, near (you'll never guess) the harbor."
Aqueduct & market in Selcuk "3 miles from Ephesus. The town was relocated here after the harbor silted up, because the mosquitos breeding in the marshes caused malaria."
"This fort is on a hill overlooking Selcuk, and was built in the 5th century"
"This fort is on a hill overlooking Selcuk, and was built in the 5th century"
Church of St. John built in the hill near the castle. (The hill is called Ayasuluk) The castle is in the background.
Another view of the church of St. John. The partially hidden, fenced-off area inside the church is the supposed grave of St. John
Isa Bey Mosque Built in 1375 seen from Ayasuluk
Front entrance of the mosque
Ruins of the temple of Artemis. These few scraps are all that remain of what was once one of the Seven Wonders of the World.
Panayr Mountain. Ephesus lies on the opposite side. "One of those caves in the hillside is the Grotto of the Seven Sleepers. The legend goes that, during one of the persecutions by the Roman Emperor Decius, (c. 270 AD) seven young men fled to one of these caves to escape their pursuers. They fell asleep and awoke, thinking only a short time had passed. Instead, they found everything changed people dressed and spoke differently, and Christianity was not only not persecuted, but the official religion of the Empire. They had slept for 200 years. For many years, these caves were an object of pilgrimage and a favorite burial ground."
 
View on the way to the home of the Blessed Virgin. Ephesus lies over the hill on the left, on the way to Mary's house.
More views on the way to Mary's house
Allegedly the house where the Virgin Mary lived after she and St. John came to Ephesus. In 1824 a German woman with no education, and who had never been out of Germany, wrote a book on the life of Mary. 60 years later, two priests were struck by the accuracy of some of her descriptions and, using her book, went looking for the house. After several days, they found it. The description tallied exactly. Mary's grave is supposed to be within 500 yards of the house, but it has not yet been found. The church does not officially recognize this as Mary's house, although Pope Paul visited and prayed here in 1967.
Interior of the house.
Fountain of Mary. Near the house The water has been said to have miraculous properties.
View of the sea from the house. You could hardly ask for a prettier place to live.
Ephesus Museum: Roman sculptures
Ephesus Museum: Roman sculptures
Ephesus Museum: Roman sculptures
Ephesus Museum: Roman sarcophagus
Ephesus Museum: Roman sculptures
Ephesus Museum: Roman sculptures
Ephesus Museum: Roman sculptures
Ephesus Museum: Bronze casting of a boy riding a dolphin
Ephesus Museum: A beautiful mosaic floor
Ephesus Museum: No comment! "This was found in 1956, in a well in the brothel of Ephesus (where else?)" Easily the most notorious artifact from Ephesus.

This last picture had an interesting effect at home. Knowing that my mother often showed my slides to her Girl Scout groups, I took several clear slides and wrote on them "WARNING: Do not show these slides without reviewing them first" and put them in front of our little friend with the generous endowment. So when my mother got to that point in the show, she just clicked right on through them without thinking.


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Created 19 December 2003, Last Update 01 July 2012

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