Alumni Career Profiles

Welcome to our alumni career profiles page! Some of our UW-Green Bay graduates who majored or double-majored in Human Development volunteered to share their career journeys with you. You can connect to their written interview responses below. Keep in mind that these are just a few examples and do not represent the full range of job options with the major – that is one of the truly exciting elements of a liberal arts, interdisciplinary education.

The featured alums include recent graduates in their first jobs, as well as people who have been in the workplace for years accumulating skills and experience. You can view examples of many more graduates’ first job titles by reviewing the Career Services' alum survey results. Please remember as you look at different job titles or alumni profiles that it is not simply the degree that qualified the students for the options they pursued. They had also accumulated relevant applied experience (e.g., previous employment, volunteer work) and other qualifications (e.g., specific classes they took, double majors or minors, special skills they developed, co-curricular involvement) that helped them achieve their goals. Those individuals in options requiring graduate degrees also had to be admitted to a relevant graduate school and program, which can be a highly competitive process. You can learn more about the marketability of your degree and about graduate school in other areas of our website.

Some human development graduates are also featured on the Career Services website:

Alumna Questionnaire: Rachel

  1. What was your major and minor at UW-Green Bay, and in what year did you graduate? Do you have a graduate degree (MS/PhD), and, if so, in what field?
    I was a Psychology and Human Development double major at UW-Green Bay and I graduated in May 2010. I currently do not have a graduate degree, however I plan on returning to school next fall to obtain my MSW.
  2. What is your current job and how would you briefly describe what you do?

    My current job is with Family Services. I work at the Willow Tree Cornerstone Child Advocacy Center as an Advocate/Prevention Specialist. My role is split, however I primarily serve as the prevention specialist. To best explain my role, I need to explain the Child Advocacy Center (CAC). A CAC is made up of multi-disciplinary team (MDT) typically including representatives from Law Enforcement, Child Protection Services, the District Attorney's office, a Forensic Interviewer, an Advocate, Nurse Practitioner, Therapist and any other professional who could be beneficial in serving the child. Children are referred to the CAC from Law Enforcement and CPS when there have been allegations of physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, neglect, or when the child has been a witness to a crime or removed from a drug endangered home. When a child has experience one of these prior things, we consider that child to be a victim of child maltreatment. While child maltreatment is a similar term to child abuse, it is a broader and more encompassing term. A forensic interviewer who is trained to interview children speaks with the child in a research based, non-leading, non-biased, developmentally appropriate manner while the MDT watches the interview in another room. The advocates provide emotional support to non-offending caregivers during the interview and follows-up with the family to provide additional resources, referrals, emotional and legal support throughout the process. Before the family leaves the CAC they have the opportunity to sit down with the MDT and ask any questions they have about the interview and the process following the interview. Our CAC has a medical suite and therapy on-site. We recommend a medical evaluation to all children who make disclosure and other children in the same abuse environment. This is sometimes done for evidentiary purposes, but most often as a healing process for the child so they can be reassured their body is healthy. Therapy is also offered to families who would like to utilize therapy options. Following the interview, Law Enforcement and CPS proceed with their investigations and make investigative decisions based on the information disclosed during the interview. Our goal at the CAC is to provide the children with a comfortable, home-like environment. By recording the interview we are hopefully decreasing the amount of times a child has to speak about their abuse experience, therefore reducing the revictimization. Ultimately, our goal is to have abusers take plea agreements and the child avoiding having to testify against their maltreater.

    In my role as an advocate, I provide emotional support, referrals, and follow-up with the family throughout the court process or they feel their needs have been met. In my role as a prevention specialist, I provide education in schools and other venues about child maltreatment. In schools, I education children about what child abuse is-physical abuse and sexual abuse, what to do if they are being abused, how to identify safe adults, and what to do if they need help. For older students I also speak about bullying, sexual harassment, victim dynamics, primary prevention, and community resources. I also present to adults in a variety of roles such as; treatment foster home parents, students going into the human services field, and teachers. This education allows people who are frequently in contact with children to identify children at risk for child maltreatment and provides them with the tools to properly support a child who may be experiencing child maltreatment.

  3. How do you use your human development and/or psychology education in your current job? If you do not, please explain.
    I use my human development and psychology degree frequently in my field. To understand the complexity of child maltreatment, it is important that I understand the child's developmental stage, the child's emotional stage, how people experience trauma and abuse, the interaction of mental health problems and child maltreatment. These are things I learned in trainings and have built on my educational foundation. To have the foundation of human developmental stages in crucial for me to best serve clients. Also, a comprehensive and basic understanding of psychology and the impact it plays on our day-to-day life helps me understand my client's needs.
  4. Was this your first job upon graduation? If not, what was your first job?
    This was not my first job following graduation. I worked two part time jobs after graduation. One job was with Encompass as a day care worker, the other with Innovative Services as a personal care worker. I had previously done child care type work and expected to easily find a job within that specific field. However, I had never done anything similar to a personal care worker. When I took these positions I knew the CAC would be opening in late 2010, however I did not know the exact date, when they would start hiring, or if I would be hired. I was hoping those jobs would just be temporary.
  5. What kinds of things did you do as a student (e.g., specific classes taken, independent studies, working with your advisor or career services, volunteer work, part-time jobs) that you believe made you successful in your job search and/or competitive as a job candidate? Is there anything you didn’t do, that you wish you had done?

    I think the most important thing that helped me be successful in my job search was getting an internship my senior year. I found the internship listed on PRO and contacted Dr. Bartell to see if she would be willing to supervise my internship with the Sexual Assault Center. She agreed, and I set up an interview with the Sexual Assault Center. My internship there gave me an incredible opportunity to apply my classroom knowledge in a professional, community agency. It truly gave me invaluable work experience. While there are classes and part-time jobs that I believe assisted me with what I do now, I thoroughly credit my internship alone for helping me get the job I currently have. If I had not received the support from faculty members and staff members at my internship I do not believe I would have this job.

    There were some classes I particularly enjoyed and some that have truly benefited me in my job. I feel that Drugs and Behavior was an important class. It has helped me better understand how the brain works under the influence of drugs and alcohol. This is useful because many of the children we work with may have been in homes where they were exposed to drugs or alcohol. Abnormal psychology and clinical child psychology were also both important classes for me to take. They have allowed me to get familiar with diagnosis and treatment plans. This allows me to communicate and understand what information a therapist has and how I can present information most effectively to them. They also gave me an understanding of the impact of mental health problems. Family Development allowed me the opportunity to better understand family dynamics and the impact that family development can have on clients. Death, dying, and loss has significantly benefited the cases I have where there has been a death due to child maltreatment or homicide, usually domestic violence. My understanding of children's developmental stages and their ability to deal with and describe grief, death, and the trauma they are experiencing is crucial to assist surviving family members in supporting the children throughout the grief process. Culture, development, and health allowed me the opportunity to become more culturally competent. I valued learning more about a variety of cultures. I feel this knowledge has allowed me the opportunity to understand and better respect different cultural background my clients have. The cultural background can also play a significant role in the process of how the child discloses, how the family reacts, and the support, or lack of support, provided to the victim. As I look at my transcripts, I am finding more and more classes that shape and provide a foundation for my work experience. It is important to remember gaining knowledge to take a test is quite different that practical application of the knowledge. Volunteer work and part-time jobs are also excellent opportunities to establish community connections. They allow you the opportunity to learn more about the variety of work in the field and find what interest you most. In my experience, many work places and volunteer sites have recommended strong part-time employees or volunteers for career type positions after the student has completed their education.

  6. What advice would you give to current UW-Green Bay human development and/or psychology students with regard to making the most of their education and making themselves maximally competitive for employment post-graduation?
    The BEST advice I would give to a current human development/psychology student is get an internship. Had I not pursued my internship I doubt I would have been successful in finding a job to truly engage and push my interest and passions. Involvement in on-campus activities and psychology/human development groups is important to establish a connection with professors. If there was one thing I would have done more of this would have been it. I was involved on-campus, had good attendance and participation in class, however I would have made more of a point to establish a connection with professors outside of the classroom.
 

Alumna Questionnaire: Angela

  1. What was your major and minor at UW-Green Bay, and in what year did you graduate? Do you have a graduate degree (MS/PhD), and, if so, in what field?
    I double majored in Human Development and Psychology and graduated in 2010. I am currently attending a graduate program for school counseling at Lakeland College (Green Bay Campus).
  2. What is your current job and how would you briefly describe what you do?
    Right now I work as a childcare provider for the YMCA, but will graduate from my counseling program in December 2013 then will begin looking for a school counselor job.
  3. How do you use your human development and/or psychology education in your current job? If you do not, please explain.
    In my current job I use my education to help me interact with children and parents. My education has also helped me to understand children and the ways they develop. I definitely felt prepared for my graduate program after majoring in human development and psychology. I also learned many skills at UWGB that helped me to build confidence in writing papers, performing research, and achieving success in college.
  4. Was this your first job upon graduation? If not, what was your first job?
    When I graduated from UWGB I worked as a childcare coordinator for the YMCA. I recently stepped down from this position in order to focus on my school counseling practicum.
  5. What kinds of things did you do as a student (e.g., specific classes taken, independent studies, working with your advisor or career services, volunteer work, part-time jobs) that you believe made you successful in your job search and/or competitive as a job candidate? Is there anything you didn’t do, that you wish you had done?
    Throughout college I worked for the YMCA doing childcare. Working in childcare helped me gain experience with children so I was able to decide what counseling track I wanted to pursue. I took as many human development and psychology classes as I could, and made sure to take all the counseling classes that were offered. I met with my advisor frequently to discuss classes, my career track, and my plans after graduation. I also frequently talked with professors about the possibility of going to graduate school. Professors were always willing to share their experience or any information they had about graduate programs. Networking with professors and other human development and psychology students definitely helped me to achieve success at UWGB. Looking back I wish I would have gotten involved more. If I could do things over I would consider being a TA for a class. I would also consider an independent study, and getting involved in organizations on campus that are connected to human development and psychology.
  6. What advice would you give to current UW-Green Bay human development and/or psychology students with regard to making the most of their education and making themselves maximally competitive for employment post-graduation?
    I would say the biggest thing is to network with professors and other students. When applying for graduate school most programs require letters or recommendation. Building relationships with others helps with this process because professors that know you personally may be more inclined to provide a letter of recommendation. I would also suggest getting involved in organizations and activities that promote human development and psychology on campus. Ask questions and get involved in class. Getting involved provides you with a better learning experience. I would also suggest planning for the future. I decided halfway through my senior year that I wanted to attend grad school. Deciding this late was difficult because I felt stressed and overwhelmed at times. Start looking at job or school options early, and have a plan if something doesn't work out. Use your time at UWGB to gain great experience and knowledge that will help you when looking for a job or graduate program.

Alumna Questionnaire: Elaina

  1. What was your major and minor at UW-Green Bay, and in what year did you graduate? Do you have a graduate degree (MS/PhD), and, if so, in what field?
    My degree is in Human Development and Psychology. I do not have a graduate degree yet.
  2. What is your current job and how would you briefly describe what you do?
    am currently a financial aid adviser (30%) and veteran services adviser (70%). There are 425 students at UW-Green Bay that use veteran education benefits. As Veteran Certifying Official for UW-Green Bay, I guide veterans through the maze of veteran’s benefits and financial aid. This involves interviewing the student when they first arrive and determining their veteran benefits and financial aid. Each student veteran who walks thru the door has benefits unique to their experiences in the military.
  3. How do you use your human development and/or psychology education in your current job?If you do not, please explain.

    I chose Human Development and Psychology because I knew I would be working with a group of students who were not traditional students and who have lived some unique, live-changing experiences.

    Many of the veterans I work with have service-related disabilities and transitioning issues. As a result, I work closely with our disability office, our counseling and health office and the dean of student office. I also work closely with veteran offices in the community like the Green Bay Vet Clinic, the Veteran Center and surrounding county veteran offices. When a service member does not get paid and it turns into a hardship case, I advocate for him/her with the local congressman’s office. In this position I have had to deal with homelessness, the aftermath of suicide and destructive behavior. There have been times when I have a student in tears in my office. Although it is not my job to counsel students, I have to know when it is necessary to walk them to the counseling and health office to meet with a counselor.

    The courses I took in psychology and human development that dealt with stress-related problems became very important. Many of these veterans/students have come back to school after being in an extremely high state of stress for over a year. Also, PTSD, TBI and suicidal behavior became familiar topics I dealt with each semester. I learned how important it is to have a strong support group; both for myself and the students.

    Also, a large number of veterans are adult students who went from high school right into the military. They may not have taken college prep courses in high school or even the SAT/ACT and they are very anxious about jumping into the role of student. Sometimes they need to be encouraged to seek out tutoring or additional help. These are people who do not usually ask for help.

  4. Was this your first job upon graduation? If not, what was your first job?
    I was already in the position of Veteran Certifying Official at UW-Green Bay when I graduated in 2006. My graduation was well timed because of the rise in number of veterans returning to school from the recent wars. My position was re- evaluated in 2009 and it went from a classified position to an academic staff position. I even had to reapply and interview for this upgraded position. Having a degree in human development and psychology helped me to secure this position.
  5. What kinds of things did you do as a student (e.g., specific classes taken, independent studies, working with your advisor or career services, volunteer work, part-time jobs) that you believe made you successful in your job search and/or competitive as a job candidate? Is there anything you didn’t do, that you wish you had done?
    Courses in human development theory, counseling across the lifespan, personality theory and abnormal psych were courses I found helpful. Although I did not take an internship, I felt I was consistently in an internship in my current position as veteran certifying official. I was constantly absorbing new information helpful to my job. I also took on additional responsibility as the veteran student club adviso
  6. What advice would you give to current UW-Green Bay human development and/or psychology students with regard to making the most of their education and making themselves maximally competitive for employment post-graduation?

    Take your courses seriously. There is always a chance you will use what you learned in your future, especially from the psychology and human development area. Unless you live in a glass case, you will be dealing with people.

    Take advantage of any internship opportunities and volunteer in the community. Use volunteer opportunities to determine if a certain job position is right for you.

Alumna Questionnaire: Paula

  1. What was your major and minor at UW-Green Bay, and in what year did you graduate? Do you have a graduate degree (MS/PhD), and, if so, in what field?

    Undergrad – major in human development and minor in psychology. Master’s degree in Community Human Services with specializations in counseling and administration

  2. What is your current job and how would you briefly describe what you do?

    Service Line Director for Prevea Health. I manage 6 clinic departments (Behavioral Care, OB/GYN, Maternal Fetal Medicine, GI, Infusion Therapy and the reception staff department), 15 physician practices and about 400 staff. I oversee all the critical functions that keep a clinical department running so the physicians and allied health providers (NP, PA, therapists, etc.) can take care of patients.

  3. How do you use your human development and/or psychology education in your current job? If you do not, please explain.

    I use all the skills I learned in school as I manage staff and patient needs. I am a planner, counselor, administrator, motivator and everything in between for my depts. I work closely with physicians as they develop their practices and make sure they have busy productive practices.

  4. Was this your first job upon graduation? If not, what was your first job?

    My first job after my masters was as a counselor/case manager for pregnant and parenting teenagers in a state funded program called Prenatal Care Coordination.

  5. What kinds of things did you do as a student (e.g., specific classes taken, independent studies, working with your advisor or career services, volunteer work, part-time jobs) that you believe made you successful in your job search and/or competitive as a job candidate? Is there anything you didn’t do, that you wish you had done?

    I believe all of my classes have been helpful in one context or another. The volunteer work and experiences I had during school were also very helpful in transitioning into the professional workforce. Internships were great as well

  6. What advice would you give to current UW-Green Bay human development and/or psychology students with regard to making the most of their education and making themselves maximally competitive for employment post-graduation?

    I would encourage the following:

    • volunteer work in your respective fields
    • a business/administrative class or two (be prepared to look into both for profit and nonprofit careers)
    • look at the upcoming job market to see what careers are understaffed – so that you are preparing for a career that is looking for workers
    • being bilingual is a tremendous advantage
    • consider going on to graduate school
    • find out where in the USA there are job openings for what you want to do and think about whether you are willing to move or not

Alumna Questionnaire: Dawn

  1. What was your major and minor at UW-Green Bay, and in what year did you graduate? Do you have a graduate degree (MS/PhD), and, if so, in what field?

    I graduated in August of 2010 with a double major in Psychology and Human Development. Currently, this is my highest level of education.

  2. What is your current job and how would you briefly describe what you do?

    I work as a Mental Health Practitioner (MHP) with Fraser. As a MHP, I am given a caseload of clients who have been diagnosed primarily with autism, however some have multiple diagnoses. For each client, I am expected to create and implement goals, ensure all necessary paperwork is up to date, and most importantly, work with children and teens to improve their level of functioning. Additionally, I run a team of 5-7 behavioral aides, which means I oversee their cases and provide direction to them.

  3. How do you use your human development and/or psychology education in your current job? If you do not, please explain.

    I use both Human Development and Psychology in my current job in many different ways. First, I use Human Development to assess a client’s current level of functioning and compare it to where they need to be developmentally. I also use human development to help families if they are struggling with maintaining a stable living environment. This way I am able to share strategies that worked best for children’s development. For Psychology, I use my knowledge about the variety of disorders (since kids with autism are typically diagnoses with other disorders). I also often have to read the multiaxial system when reading a diagnostic assessment on a child. I often deal with families from different races as well, therefore I use many ideas learned from Multicultural Counseling. Finally, I use some ideas gained about counseling as well when talking to parents and families of the children.

  4. Was this your first job upon graduation? If not, what was your first job?

    While in college, I worked at Wisconsin Early Autism Project (WEAP), a company that provides autism services. Once I graduated, I moved to Minnesota to be with my fiancé. There, I found another job working with autism and was offered an entry-level position known as a Development Trainee/Behavioral Aide. In order to be considered for a MHP position, I had to complete 2000 hours of supervised work with special needs children in addition to a degree in a social science. Once I met the hours, I applied for the MHP position.

  5. What kinds of things did you do as a student (e.g., specific classes taken, independent studies, working with your advisor or career services, volunteer work, part-time jobs) that you believe made you successful in your job search and/or competitive as a job candidate? Is there anything you didn’t do, that you wish you had done?

    While in college, I worked with Good Times Programming on campus. I started as the Innovative Sounds Coordinator and moved up to Executive Director. My current employer was interested in my Executive Director position because I ran a team of seven coordinators. This showed them I was able to handle leading a team, which I also do in my current position. My current job was also interested in the fact that I gained experience with ABA counseling through WEAP. They liked this because I had previous knowledge with what I was applying for.

  6. What advice would you give to current UW-Green Bay human development and/or psychology students with regard to making the most of their education and making themselves maximally competitive for employment post-graduation?

    The best way to succeed after graduation is to network. I say this because if someone spends all of their time in the library, on Facebook and/or goes home every weekend, then they will have no connections/recommendations when it is time to find a job. If someone were to spend their time wisely and get to know people in the field they are interested in, then it will be easier for them to know where to find a job and to have the connections necessary to support them in that decision. The last bit of advice I would give is to believe in you. The more confidence you have in yourself, the easier it will be for someone else to see that and want to hire you. Sometimes it can be hard, but in order to succeed, you need to believe in yourself. No one will want to hire someone who doesn’t think they are capable. “Your belief determines your action and your action determines your results, but first you have to believe.” - Mark Victor Hansen

 

Alumna Questionnaire: Jessica

  1. What was your major and minor at UW-Green Bay, and in what year did you graduate? Do you have a graduate degree (MS/PhD), and, if so, in what field?

    I double-majored in Human Development and Psychology, and I graduated in May 2011. I am currently in my first semester of my master’s program in Higher Education and Student Affairs at the University of South Carolina – Columbia. I will graduate with my Masters in Education in May 2014.

  2. What is your current job and how would you briefly describe what you do?

    Prior to starting my master’s program, I worked for that year after graduating UWGB. I worked with Infinite Ability, INC which is a family-owned and family-oriented company that helps care for and rehabilitate patients that have suffered traumatic brain injuries. The main office is located in Sun Prairie, WI and they have 6 homes and a day program center for the patients, throughout Dane, Columbia, and Sauk Counties. I worked 38-40 hours per week as a third-shift (11pm-7am) care-partner. Typically, I would help my 3 clients with daily (or night/morning) life tasks, pass/administer medications, do physical therapy, brain-teasers, some counseling, cooking, and keep a log of activities, illnesses, behaviors, and progress for each client.

    Currently, I am a full-time graduate student and a part-time graduate assistant for the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition (NRC). I work with the assessment, grants, and research branch at the NRC where I work with my advisor and NRC director on potentially funded research projects, research opportunities, edit surveys, edit data, enter data, proof-read writing, help write grants, help with grant-selection process, assess research, help point others toward correct resources, and staff conferences hosted by NRC. I think that about covers it!

  3. How do you use your human development and/or psychology education in your current job? If you do not, please explain.

    When I worked with Infinite Ability, Inc., my Human Development education was important in understanding the different life-stages and life-tasks my client were at and Psychology played a crucial role in better understanding my clients’ injuries, illnesses, and behaviors. Both of my majors played a role in better understanding and caring for my clients. My interdisciplinary education from UWGB prepared me to have an understanding in areas applicable to my work (i.e., human biology for physical therapy and other medical needs, and understanding cross-cultural differences, social work, etc.). Traumatic brain injuries are complicated and Human Development/Psychology at UWGB granted me the knowledge of the human brain, attitudes, and behaviors that gave me the skills to care for my clients. Having had classes in human biology and with students bound for nursing through the UWGB/Bellin program; I had remembered having conversations in class and with those students that helped me with the medical/physical therapy aspects of my job. Having some experience with social work students through my Human Development courses, I was better prepared with the social work aspect of my job (i.e., keeping a progress/activities log, etc.) and I was able to converse with the social workers that came by the home because I had shared common knowledge with their expertise.

    For my GA position, my entire bachelor’s degree is crucial for actual position but my degrees and experiences at UWGB landed me the position. Because of the requirements for the double-major, I have taken 3 courses in stats/research (Social Science Stats, Experimental Psych, and Dev. Research Methods) and with my experiences of having a Research Assistantship twice, I was sought out by the director of the NRC and by the previous GA in this position (grants, assessment, and research). For my master’s program, my research experience has set me up with the skills to do a thesis for the program (only a handful of masters students actually do the thesis option versus the comprehensive exam option) that can potentially be the start of a dissertation for when I seek my doctoral degree. The interdisciplinary aspect of my undergraduate education is highly valued by my professors, advisors, and staff – they were all very impressed with my degrees’ richness and unique quality.

  4. Was this your first job upon graduation? If not, what was your first job?

    My first full-time job was with Infinite Ability, Inc. upon graduation from UWGB and prior to my acceptance into University of South Carolina – Columbia, (USC).

  5. What kinds of things did you do as a student (e.g., specific classes taken, independent studies, working with your advisor or career services, volunteer work, part-time jobs) that you believe made you successful in your job search and/or competitive as a job candidate? Is there anything you didn’t do, that you wish you had done?

    I firmly believe that my enrollment into my First-Year Seminar course really launched my success and absolute completion from UWGB and it really paved the way to finding my passion for the First-Year Experience. Which this passion has driven me to apply to USC and apply to my GA position at the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition in grants, research, and assessment. Working with my advisor, Dr. Bartell as her research assistant really gave me confidence in my abilities to do research and opened my eyes up to the world of Higher Education and Student Affairs. I find that both research assistant opportunities (and in combination with my research/stats courses: Social Science Stats, Experimental Psych, and Dev. Research Methods) really made me competitive in my application to graduate school and for hiring in my GA position. I had conferencing experience thanks to my many involvements on UWGB’s campus (NRHH, Psi Chi, Phi Eta Sigma, Peer Mentor and my Research Assistantships) and I also gained leaderships skills being a leader in my orgs: Phi Eta Sigma, NRHH, and Psi Chi. When I became a Peer Mentor, I truly valued being a student at UWGB and I was honored to be a mentor to those in my first-year seminar... it really kept my passion for the First-Year experience alive and well. Being an Ambassador for UWGB was a very rich experience too and it really looks and feels good to say “I was an Ambassador at UWGB! I was a role model and representative for my undergraduate institution.” Being in two wonderful majors, I got to meet wonderful staff members that are so invested into their students that I got to know many on a personal level and these connections are INVAULABLE! Very helpful for my acceptance into Graduate School and my advisor was well-known by my director for my part-work as a GA. Studying Abroad with Dr. Cupit to South Africa was a true immersion of culture mixed with my knowledge and practices in Human Development and Psychology... and it was a wonderful, once-in-a- lifetime opportunity that I find to be priceless. Finally, me being a University of Wisconsin – Green Bay Phoenix is in itself, something I cannot put a number on (even with my not-so-little student loans). Like I had mentioned before, the interdisciplinary aspect and focus at UWGB is truly unique, involving, and one-of-a-kind that other degrees from other institutions really cannot compare to my degrees from UWGB. You may not see it now as a student or perhaps you really don’t see the full potential of your interdisciplinary education, but when you are hired for a job, applying to graduate school, or using your degree in a field, you WILL stand out of the crowd and you WILL be well-prepared for any work, schooling, or experience that comes your way in life. You have truly been given the key to success and an experience of a lifetime.

    Answering the second portion of the question; is there anything you didn’t do that you wish you had? No, there really isn’t anything that comes to mind that I missed-out on in my undergrad experience – my experience was lived to its full potential and very rich that I would do it all over again if asked.

  6. What advice would you give to current UW-Green Bay human development and/or psychology students with regard to making the most of their education and making themselves maximally competitive for employment post-graduation?

    Become involved – I was always told that as a freshman and I could never really understand what that meant until I became a Peer Mentor. When I became a Peer Mentor I was the student encouraging other students to become involved but this time I had experience on my side and was able to give these new students ideas and opportunities to become involved. It doesn’t have to start out big; you can simply attend a presentation at the Union, take up a professor’s offer for assisting them on a project, or simply joining a club. There are an ABUNDANT of opportunities and experiences waiting for you, every day at UWGB, you just have to open those doors when you see (or hear) them!

    Really pay attention to your degrees – remember that you are a Phoenix at UWGB. You have been given the key to success and an experience of a lifetime through the interdisciplinary aspect in your education. You really have it good so continue to do well in your course work and become involved with your degrees and staff members. These connections you make now will take you far in your career and education, so be sure to introduce yourselves to all of your professors and be engaged in your classes and with your learning.

    Talk to your advisors NOW about your future goals – Even if you don’t know what these goals are yet... your advisors are skilled and knowledgeable which means that they could have a few ideas for you in how you can find out what your future goals are and what paths you need to take to reach your goals.

    If you EVER have a question or are struggling, please ask for help or clarity right away! There is a profuse amount of services at your disposal at UWGB and these services are there for YOU! Do not ever hesitate to ask a question or to seek help from these wonderful service members. Even if you do not know where to look or who to ask, just ask anyone and they will direct you in the right direction.

    Always take the risk to say “YES” to an opportunity – the risk is worth its weight in gold. However, be aware of your limits. You don’t want to stretch yourself too thin... challenge yourself but do not set yourself up for disaster.