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Institute forLearning in Retirement

Winter/Spring 2015 Programs

Course: (N) = New; (C) = Continuing; (R) = Repeat
Location: RH = Rose Hall; Mauthe Center;
NPM = Neville Public Museum
Kroc Center, Christie Theatre - University Union

Click here to download 2015 Winter Spring Catalog

If you wish to enroll, you may register online or send in a registration form from the
Spring Catalog Link (above.)

Monday

INTRODUCTION TO WOODCARVING (R) - CLOSED

Course No. 1
Presenter: William Wright
Coordinator: Ken Haugen
Dates: Jan. 5, 12
Limit: 12 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Bellevue Community Center

In session one, students will explore a brief history of woodcarving, the types of items which are being carved, types of tools used, type of wood used and tool safety. Session two will provide students a hands-on opportunity to carve a small project. All tools will be provided for students to use while
in the class. A $5 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.

 

IT’S A MYSTERY TO ME (C)-CLOSED

Course No. 2
Presenter/Coordinator: Paul Steffek
Dates: Jan. 5; Feb. 9; Mar. 9; Apr. 6; May 4
Limit: 20 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Barnes & Noble

We will discuss the latest mysteries we have read. We will examine a really good work of fiction and nonfiction. Each participant will have a few
minutes to tell why they liked a particular book or author.


PHARMACY – A HISTORIC OVERVIEW IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGES OF MEDICATIONS AND THE PROFESSION (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 3
Presenter: Brian Barkow, Pharm. D.
Coordinators: David Manke, Dorothy Bertolini
Date: Jan 12
Limit: 100 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 250

This session will look at the recent history of pharmacy from two different angles, the drugs and the profession. This course will explain how ideas for drugs come about, to demonstrate how they go from an idea to your medicine cabinet, and to demystify the forces that keep changing their color,
shape and your co-pays. This course will also look at how the local corner-store druggist has both changed and remained the same.


AN ARTIST AND A BOOK (C)

Course No. 4
Presenters: Interested Course Participants
Coordinators: Julie Arneth, Judy Laskowski
Dates: Jan. 12; Feb. 23; Mar. 23; Apr. 27
Limit: 15 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

Join this special-interest group to discuss artist-related novels and nonfi ction and the art works detailed in them. Participate alone or with a partner to lead a book discussion or a presentation on the art-related topic of the month. In order to have time to read a book before the fi rst meeting, the title
will be included with the confi rmation letter.


AVIATION ADVENTURES (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 5
Presenter: Sherwood Williams, Ph.D.
Coordinator: Barbara Beaver
Date: Jan. 26
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: CAVU Flight School

Explore the past, present and future of general aviation. See and experience the resources for general aviation at Executive Air and the CAVU Aviation training school located at Austin Straubel International Airport. Speak with experienced pilots, teachers and explore the aircraft they fly. Learn about
the breadth of opportunities from recreational to commercial carrier certification. Discuss how photography and discovery flights are available through Executive Air.


REVISITING THE LEGEND OF JEAN NICOLET (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 6
Presenter: Shirley VerBruggen
Coordinator: Janice Rickert
Date: Jan. 26
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 230

The French explorer Jean Nicolet has long held an important place in Wisconsin’s history books and classrooms. However, controversy surrounds the story of Jean Nicolet’s voyage. Did he really land at Red Banks? Was he truly searching for a western sea to China or were there other motives for his
famous voyage? Join presenter Shirley Verbruggen to revisit the legend of Jean Nicolet.

WOMEN ON THE GO (N)

Course No. 7
Presenter: Mary Ellen Beebe
Coordinator: Anneliese Waggoner
Date: Jan. 26
Limit: 40 Time: 1- 4 pm Room: RH 220

Hubby doesn’t like to travel? Friends don’t like to pack? Meet other women who are interested in travel. Plan a trip or just dream. Learn about travel options available, planning the itinerary, and logistics of a trip. Come prepared to network.


STRATEGIC THINKING THROUGH GAMES (C)-CLOSED

Course No. 8
Presenter: Mary Johnson
Coordinators: Judy Hastert, Sue Johnson
Dates: Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23; Mar. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27
Limit: 24 Time: 1 – 4 pm
Location: Bellevue Community Center

This course is designed to stimulate strategic thinking while learning new games to play with family and friends. Challenging card games, board games and dominoes will be featured. The games are easy to learn and suitable for large or small groups.


LEGAL ISSUES FOR THE ELDERLY-CLOSED

Course No. 9
Presenters: Robert Geimer, Matthew Geimer, Mary Rose Orcutt
Coordinator: John Arneth
Dates: Feb. 16, 23
Limit: 40 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

We will check legal issues affecting the elderly including wills, trusts, power of attorney documents, guardianship, estate tax, planning for nursing home, gift tax rules and other elder law issues. The Geimer Law Firm has concentrated in elder law issues since 1990. Robert Geimer started the firm and has
practiced with Mary Rose for nine years and Matthew for six.


WATERCOLOR (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 10
Presenter: Rose Kunesh
Coordinator: Wes Carvenough
Dates: Feb. 16, 23; Mar. 2, 9, 16
Limit: 35 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Art Garage

This watercolor class is for beginners to experts with demonstrations of specific techniques and methods learned over the years. It will show how to control watercolor. The goal is to enlighten and inspire.


A SAVORY AND SWEET APPROACH TO PHYLLO DOUGH (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 11
Presenter: Mary Pappas
Coordinators: Session A: Mary Williams; Session B: Dorothy Bertolini
Dates: Session A – Feb. 23 / Session B – Mar 2
Limit: 12 Time: 6:30 – 8:30 pm
Location: Alpha Delights

Cook and eat a hands-on session to get people comfortable with phyllo dough. It is Greek cooking with a light meal included. Sign up for Session A or B; do not sign up for both. A fee of $38 is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


GREAT DECISIONS: FOREIGN POLICY ISSUES FACING THE UNITED STATES (N)

Course No. 12
Presenter: Jim Tanner
Coordinator: Loretta Brosig
Dates: Mar. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; Apr, 6
Limit: 75 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: FPC – Banner Hall

The course will focus on six separate topics selected from the DVD Foreign Policy Association. Following the video presentation, a discussion format will provide opportunities for participants to share views and conclusions regarding the topic. Booklets will be ordered through the office and can be
picked up to be read for the first class. The book cost will be approximately $20.


PRUNING TECHNIQUES FOR DO-IT-YOURSELFERS (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 13
Presenter: John Katalinich
Coordinator: Liz Katalinich
Date: Mar. 16
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Pruning is an integral part of maintaining the beauty of your landscape. No matter what the season or your experience level, learning these skills will ensure that it is done correctly, resulting in healthy plants. The class includes: handouts, samples, tool usage, hands-on live plant demonstrations and
specific plant identification. Yes, You can…Do-it-Yourself!

UNDERSTANDING DREAMS: JUNGIAN DREAM ANALYSIS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 14
Presenter: Dr. Richard Stevens
Coordinator: Laura Slater
Dates: Mar. 16, 19, 23, 26
Limit: 90 Time: 1 – 3:30 pm Location: NRRM

Have you wondered why some dreams seem so clear or important that you wondered if they really meant something in your life? According to one of the great students of human nature, Carl G. Jung, some dreams are a way in which our psyche puts together our thinking, emotions, spirituality
and personal life. In some dreams our subconscious presents us understandings that help us to become more aware of who we are, to clarify major issues in our lives, and to guide understanding and directions in life. This course explores ways of examining our dream’s psychological and spiritual
meanings. Analyzing dreams usually requires a symbolic not a literal interpretation.


SCOPE AND EFFECTS OF SLEEP DISORDERS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 15
Presenter: Marla Van Lanen
Coordinator: Wes Carvenough
Dates: Apr. 6, 13
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: Rose Hall 220

The different stages of sleep and patterns of the sleep cycle will be explored. Learn gender and age based differences in sleep along with symptoms
and treatments of common sleep disorders. Session two will cover sleep walking and night time behaviors.


HOMEMADE PASTA (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 16
Presenter: Kelly Dadam
Coordinator: Mary Schuster
Dates: Apr. 6, 13, 20
Limit: 7 Time: 9 am –12:30 pm
Location: First Presbyterian Church

We will cover several areas of the world and the pasta dishes from them. Pasta machine and hand-rolled pastas will be the focus. You may wish to bring an apron, rolling pin and knife. An $18 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


HOW TO READ TO CHILDREN (N)

Course No. 17
Presenter: Jeanne Pfeiffer
Coordinator: Jean Hamersky
Date: Apr. 13
Limit: 25 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Interested in reading to and with your grandchildren? Considering volunteering to read at a school, daycare or library? Join me for some tips to sharpen up your reading style as well as looking at some of the most appealing books for children.


PLAY READING FOR PLEASURE (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 18
Presenter/Coordinator: Kathy Heitl
Dates: Apr. 13, 20, 27
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Room: Rose Hall 230

A variety of plays will be read. All class members will be expected to participate in reading parts. No experience necessary.


NICARAGUA – THE ATLANTIC COAST (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 19
Presenter: Sr. Agnes Fischer
Coordinator: Barbara Beaver
Date: Apr. 20
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

A brief history of the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua. We will look at life and customs with an emphasis on the decades of the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s.


NEW DIRECTIONS: A ROADMAP TO PRISON LIFE AND BEYOND (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 20
Presenter: Dave Picard
Coordinator: Joyce Dirschl
Date: Apr. 20
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

This presentation will cover the Wisconsin Department of Corrections efforts to help men and women who become incarcerated. The film/discussion will explore what happens to an individual when a judge sentences them to prison. We will look at programs developed to help the incarcerated
make changes to the way they live.

CATHEDRAL TOUR (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 21
Presenter: Sonia Hitt
Coordinator: Terry Blaser
Date: Apr. 27
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Xavier Cathedral

Learn the history and tour St. Francis Xaviar Cathedral. Attendees may learn more in the museum located in the basement of the Cathedral.
A $2 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN WISCONSIN (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 22
Presenters: Cyndee Sweetland, Stacy Yashinsky
Coordinator: Diane Wilson
Date: Apr. 27
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Human trafficking is a form of modern day slavery where people have been forced to provide labor, sex or organs to another individual for the benefit of someone else. The presenters are working with several organizations (in Green Bay, Milwaukee and globally) to educate our community on this
very real issue. This problem is growing rapidly and affects individuals in our area, Wisconsin and globally. The presentation will include some short videos.

RENAISSANCE LITERATURE: THE SONNET (N)

Course No. 23
Presenter: Jason Zirbel
Coordinator: Nancy Whitfi eld
Date: May 4
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

The sonnet form is sometimes mistakenly attributed to Francis Petrarch, a 14th Century Italian poet who has come to be known as the “Father of Humanism”. This class will begin with the emergence of the sonnet in 13th Century Sicily, tracing the sonnet’s cultural significance through different
historical periods from the Renaissance to the present day. Special focus will be placed on this relationship between the sonnet’s relatively unchanging poetic structure and the evolution of its conventions and themes during the past 800 years.


BIRDING A HOTSPOT (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 24
Presenter: Barbara Brebner
Coordinators: Session A: Susan Ross; Session B: Ed Smith
Dates: Session A: May 4 / Session B: May 11
Limit: 20 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: For the Birds

In this course we will explain how to accurately identify wild birds, provide quick binocular advice for spotting skills and how to approach identification with a simple system that will make bird watching and nature more fun. We will walk the grounds around Abbey Pond in DePere. Bring binoculars,
field guides and comfy shoes. Sign up for Session A or B; do not sign up for both.

 

Tuesday

SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS (R)

Course No. 25
Presenter: Mike Murphy
Coordinators: Betty Cicero, Anneliese Waggoner
Date: Jan. 6
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Location: NPM

A brief introduction to some of Shakespeare’s most famous sonnets and to some of the questions they raise that have puzzled commentators for the past 400 years: Why and how do these sonnets diff er from most sonnets written before or after them? Why were they suppressed after publication?
Who was “the Dark Lady”? Who was “the rival poet”? What, if anything, do the sonnets reveal about Shakespeare’s secret life?


HIDDEN TREASURES: THE GEOLOGY OF THE CAVES IN NORTHEASTERN WISCONSIN (N)

Course No. 26
Presenter: Prof. John Luczaj
Coordinators: Ed Smith, Mary Cook
Date: Jan. 6
Limit: 250 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 250

This course explores the geology and origin of caves in eastern Wisconsin. Topics covered will include the formation of caves, their ages and
the record of the physical and biological events they preserve.


PASSPORT TO RETIREMENT (N)

Course No. 27
Presenter: John Weninger
Coordinator: Judy Hastert
Dates: Jan. 6, 13, 20
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

John guides you on the home stretch as this class will chart a course to help your money last the length of retirement. We will discuss the five action items to chart your course and the four critical concerns of retirement (taxes, inflation, Investment Portfolio Management, Outliving Your Retirement
Income). We will spend a focused time on the fundamentals of estate conservation and planning strategies. Each participant will receive two
workbooks to assist in the development of a retirement plan. A $6 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.

LAKOTA SPIRITUALITY (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 28
Presenter: Del J. Cornette D.M.
Coordinator: Ann Krawczyk
Dates: Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27
Limit: 30 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Bellevue Community Center

Instructor has lived and studied with Lakota spiritual leaders during the last three decades. He has been a participant in Lakota ceremonies during this time and was told by one of his teachers, a Lakota Medicine Man, to facilitate Lakota rituals. The instructor wrote his Master’s Thesis on the
symbology of Lakota ceremonial practices and his Doctoral Dissertation on Energy Healing. The course will integrate ritual with healing practices since, in Lakota cosmology, they are inseparable.


GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER (R)

Course No. 29
Presenters: Kathy Heitl, Marilyn Rabideau
Coordinator: Marilyn Rabideau
Dates: *Jan. 6, 27; Feb. 24; Mar. 24; Apr. 28; May 19; June 23; July 28; Aug 25
Limit: 30 Time: *10:00 am – 12 / 5:30 pm
Room: *Rose Hall 220/Off Campus

Make new friends but keep the old; one is silver, but the other is gold. Friends, food and fun will be featured when we take turns hosting a small group (6-8) in our home for a potluck supper once a month on Tuesday evenings at 5:30 pm. Each registered participant will receive a list of each
course participant with the name and phone number.


KEYSTONE LV PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 30
Presenter: Jim Tanner
Coordinator: Barry Burrows
Dates: Jan. 13, 20
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Let’s get more facts and less hype! This will be an exploration of the details of oil from Canadian tar sands plus how the keystone LV pipeline is integral to it. “Who has something to gain and what?” This view presents both sides of the issue.

CONTINUING ISSUES (R)

Course No. 31
Presenters/Coordinators: Paul Steff ek & Steve Jansen
Dates: Jan 13, 27; Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24; Mar 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; Apr 7, 14, 21, 28; May 12, 19
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 230

This course addresses continuing issues in the U.S. and the world. This is a participation course providing the opportunity to consider ongoing and
new issues with others of like mind, but not necessarily in agreement. It is not mandatory to enter the discussion. A wide spectrum of views is offered
in this course. All participants MUST be willing to respect all views.


IS THE BOOK BETTER THAN THE MOVIE (R)

Course No. 32
Presenter: Paul Steff ek
Coordinator: Nancy Kohrman
Dates: Jan 13, Feb. 10, Mar. 10, Apr 7, May 12
Limit: 50 Time: 9:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Have you ever compared a movie made from a book and found one far superior to the other? The goal of this course is to read novels, view their screen counterparts and decide how the two compare. The first book will be Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen. Subsequent selections will be
announced later. Please read the book before the movie is presented.


DISCOVER THE PHILIPPINES (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 33
Presenter: Prof. Robert Boyer
Coordinator: Joyce Dirschl
Date: Jan. 20
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 230

There is a saying about the colonial experience of the Philippines that “it spent three hundred years in the convent and fifty years in Hollywood.”
That would have been under Spain and the U. S. until independence was restored in 1946. Filipino tour guides will often ask groups what are the
three largest English-Speaking countries in the world. The answer: U.S., Great Britain and the Philippines. The Philippines continue to be the major Southeast Asian ally for the U. S. and its bridge to China. Filipinos welcome American visitors and are glad to share their deliciously sunny and warm
climate from December to March.

GEOLOGY AND 20TH CENTURY HISTORY (N)

Course No. 34
Presenter: Prof. Ryan Currier
Coordinator: Ed Smith, Barry Burrows
Dates: Jan. 20, 22
Limit: 150 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 250

A Geologist’s View of Americans: Rocks have fundamentally influenced human and American history; where we live (and do not live), our cultures,
our technologies and many historical events have been shaped by geological phenomena. This course investigates the geology behind many taken-for-granite aspects of American culture and history in the 20th century. This is a two day course.


FLYING ON THE RAILS – A HIGH SPEED RAIL DISCUSSION (N)

Course No. 35
Presenter: Robert Lettenberger
Coordinator: Nancy McGrew
Dates: Jan. 20, 27; Feb. 3
Limit: 90 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: NRRM

Since the 1930s the idea of high-speed rail (HSR) travel has fascinated our world. In today’s world, what really is HSR? How has it progressed over the past seven decades? Where will it take us in the future? We’ll explore this mode of transportation from numerous aspects and attempt to answer
the questions we all have about it. A $10 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


WRITING YOUR MEMOIRS (C)-CLOSED

Course No. 36
Presenter: Mary Lynn Hall
Coordinators: Kathy Heitl, Mary Eisenreich
Dates: Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24
Limit: 25 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: FPC – Memorial Hall

A continuing class on writing your life experiences for your family and friends. Come and get ideas and be inspired. Very informal setting where class members can share their memories.


STUFF OF LIFE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 37
Presenter: Gary Dallman
Coordinator: Karen Dallman
Dates: Jan. 27; Feb. 3
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

This course is about the basic structure and function of food. It compares carbohydrates, fats and proteins, which are the food molecules in our diets. The process of protein synthesis in cells is also examined.

MORE BRAIN FIREWORKS (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 38
Presenter: Mary Kay Dodson
Coordinator: Loretta Brosig
Dates: Jan. 27; Feb. 3
Limit: 35 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

Fire up your brain by challenging it to tackle perplexing puzzles, brain busters, number nemeses, and outlandish oddities. This will be a participatory class. The course will not repeat any material from the first course. The first Brain Fireworks is not a pre-requisite for this course.


LINE DANCING FOR BEGINNERS (C)

Course No. 39
Presenter: James Huss
Coordinators: Barbara Beaver, Beverly Shalkhauser
Dates: Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24
Limit: 60 Time: 10:00 – 11:15 am
Location: Mauthe Center

Th e fi rst two sessions of this four week course will review basic step patterns covered during the previous semester. Step patterns will then be combined and practiced at a slow tempo which will gradually be increased and applied to recordings of various country and pop tunes. Additional step
pattern combinations will be explored during sessions 3 and 4. Participation in the previous semester is not a prerequisite and partners or special attire are unnecessary.


NEARLY NATURAL NATURE CRAFTS: GORGEOUS GOURDS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 40
Presenter: Sr. Mary Ann Srnka
Coordinator: Mary Williams
Dates: Feb. 10, 17, 24
Limit: 12 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: St. Joseph’s Parish Convent

Transform a grubby gourd into a gorgeous vase. Learn the basics of cleaning, painting and embellishing.


OIL PAINTING (R)

Course No. 41
Presenter: Jim Briggs
Coordinator: Patrick Vanden Heuvel
Dates: Feb. 10, 17, 24; Mar. 3, 10, 17
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Art Garage

Th is class is for members who want to learn oil painting and is open to the novice as well as the veteran painter. Artists can choose a variety of subjects from landscapes, scenery, portraits or any other theme. Members are expected to bring their own materials and use ODORLESS products such as
Gamsol or turpenoid products during the class. A suggested supply list will be sent with your confi rmation letter.


A POET... AND YOU KNOW IT! (N)

Course No. 42
Presenter: John Katalinich
Coordinator: Liz Katalinich
Date: Feb. 17
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

You are invited to be the class! Bring a few of your favorite poems that you have written and share them with everyone. We will all take turns reading our poems, ensuring the best impact that you, the author intended. No critics, no competition, no sweat! Plan on laughter, tears, inspiration and just
plain fun! (Not a poet? Please join us anyway. Poets love a lively audience!).


THE SECRET SERVICE (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 43
Presenter: Mike Murphy
Coordinator: Ed Smith
Date: Feb. 17
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230
This course is an introduction to the curious history and complex operation of the tight-lipped federal agency charged with protecting the President. It will discuss some of the well-known failures, little known successes and major political, personal and professional challenges that the agency has dealt with over the years. Challenges such as sex and drinking scandals, the constant threat of terrorism and new technology will be visited.


INTRODUCTION TO YOGA AND AYURVEDA (R)-SESSION A - CLOSED

Course No. 44
Presenter: Kathy Eichinger
Coordinators: Session A: Sue Johnson / Session B: Barbara Beaver
Dates: Session A: Feb. 24; Session B: Apr. 14
Limit: 20 Time: Session A: 10:00 am – 12 / Session B: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Bellevue Community Center

Yoga and Are You What? You’ve probably heard of and maybe practiced yoga, but might be curious about learning of yoga’s sister science – Ayurveda (pronounced: r u vay da). This class is for those who want to have additional natural tools to take care of themselves. Wear comfortable clothes for gentle stretching. You will need to bring a mat or a large towel. Choose Session A or B; do not sign up for both sessions.

INTRODUCTION TO IRELAND (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 45
Presenter: Mike Murphy
Coordinator: Mary Eisenreich, Barry Burrows
Dates: Mar. 3, 10
Limit: 120 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Location: NPM

A light-hearted introductory overview of the landscapes, legends, and traditional culture of a country famous for its scenic beauty, friendly people,
tragic history and rich literary and musical heritage. Session 1 focuses on aspects of traditional Irish culture, Session 2 on some of Ireland’s famous
poets. This course repeats material used in several other Irish-related courses taught by the presenter in previous years.


NEARLY NATURAL NATURE CRAFTS: GREETING CARDS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 46
Presenter: Sr. Mary Ann Srnka
Coordinator: Liz Spielmann
Dates: Mar. 3, 17, 24
Limit: 12 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: St. Joseph Parish Convent

One of a kind greeting cards. Learn multiple techniques for making greeting cards using pressed flowers.


GERMAN FOR CONTINUING BEGINNERS (C)

Course No. 47
Presenter: Annette Weissbach
Coordinator: Peter Andrews
Dates: Mar. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; Apr. 7, 14, 21
Limit: 25 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Mauthe Fireside Room

Join Annette Weissbach to learn about German culture that has heavily influenced our lives in Wisconsin. Basic conversational German is emphasized with an exposure to the written language and culture as well. Participants will be able to carry on simple conversations. Students will learn additional
vocabulary words from assigned topics, read and answer questions about short stories and talk about the mechanics of the language. Two texts will be used in the class: Deluxe Edition Workbook Instant Immersion German (ISBN 1-60077-402-4) and German: A Language Map (ISBN 13-
978-0-944-502-02-0). Both may be purchased at Barnes and Noble prior to the start of class.


THE GREATEST CIRCUS TRAIN ON EARTH (N)

Course No. 48
Presenter: Robert Lettenberger
Coordinator: Diane Wilson
Dates: Mar. 17, 24, 31
Limit: 90 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Location: NRRM

The circus is coming to town and it’s traveling by train. We’ll explore the history of circus trains in the U.S. and their role in contemporary circus companies. From the specialized equipment to unique loading and unloading techniques, we explore the great circus train from locomotive to pie wagon
and crew quarters. A $10 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


CARDIO, STRENGTH AND FITNESS (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 49
Presenter: Amy Xiong
Coordinator: Jules Bader
Dates: Mar. 17, 24, 31; Apr. 7
Limit: 30 Time: 1-3 pm Location: Western Racquet

Living Strong: This course will take you through a series of low impact exercises that help you stay strong, mobile and active for everyday life. The class ends with a highly modified yoga flow. Lockers, showers and towels are provided by Western Racquet. Participants should wear appropriate
clothing and footwear for exercising.


GETTING MORE COMFORTABLE WITH H20 (N)

Course No. 50
Presenter/Coordinator: Roberta Atkinson
Dates: Mar. 17, 19, 24, 26, 31; Apr. 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23
Limit: 6 Time: 9:00 – 10:00 am
Location: CP Center

Are you missing out not enjoying the pool or the lake? Are you comfortable in the water but your swim strokes are not the best? Get ready at the CP Aquatic Center for the 2015 summer fun or your next warm weather vacation – perfect your front crawl and back stroke in the warm water. Participants must be comfortable with their face in the water and be able to float. Swim caps are optional, swim goggles are recommended. Class attendance at all sessions is recommended to achieve this goal. A $60 fee is payable to UWGreen Bay when registered status is received.

“RABBIT WAS SMALL BUT…” A LOOK AT THE RABBIT IN LITERATURE (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 51
Presenter: Joan Thorn
Coordinator: Barbara Beaver
Dates: Mar. 24, 31
Limit: 35 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

In stories from Aesop to Alice to Updike, the rabbit may be small, but he is clearly a major player. Sometimes he is defenseless; sometimes he is the master of deceit. Let’s explore the various manifestations of the rabbit in literature and consider how we respond to his (and her) presence.


INTERMEDIATE BRIDGE-STRATEGIES FOR BID AND PLAY (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 52
Presenter: John Hathaway
Coordinator: Joyce Dirschl
Dates: Mar. 24, 31; Apr. 14, 21, 28, May 5
Limit: 24 Time: 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Location: Bellevue Community Center

This is not a beginner’s class. Students should be playing at least two times per month of 24+ hands to benefit from this class. A workbook with reading and exercises will be a class requirement. The class will focus on techniques to help you win at the bridge table. Major areas of focus will include: point count bidding: do I have to bid again?; no trump bidding and play; play of the hand including what are the key questions you need to ask before playing your first card; competitive bidding; preemptive bidding to challenge your opponent; best opening leads and signals; balancing bids and much more.
The required workbook is Intermediate Bridge 5 Card Major Student Text. A $6 fee is payable to UWGreen Bay when registered status is received.


FORTY MOST COMMON LANDSCAPING MISTAKES (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 53
Presenters: John & Liz Katalinich
Coordinator: Liz Katalinich
Date: Apr. 7
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Having an established landscape or just starting out, it’s easy to make mistakes. Nature is ever changing its beauty in our landscapes. We enjoy that process and its challenges. Based on a recent HGTV (Home and Garden TV program), our very own GBBG (Green Bay Botanical Garden) and other
local experts, this course will reveal these mistakes. After all, gardeners know a “mistake” is really one of nature’s “teachable moments.”


THE HOBBY OF COLLECTING (N)

Course No. 54
Presenter: Ginny Giguere
Coordinator: Carol Joppe
Date: Apr. 14
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

Antiques Road Show and eBay may have been game changers for collectors, but the basics of collecting remain stable. We will explore this hobby’s history, it’s fun and profit, and its pitfalls and successes. Feel free to share an item from your own collection, tell us about the “thrill of the hunt,” describe a miracle find, or recount your horror story of a scam. Gather tips from class members. Learn about the latest popularity scale of different areas of collecting: oldest, newest, the most popular and strangest. Whether you are a seasoned collector, a collector in progress or a newbie, you will leave this class a wiser collector hobbyist.


NEARLY NATURAL NATURE CRAFTS: FOR THE BIRDS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 55
Presenter: Sr. Mary Ann Srnka
Coordinator: Sharon Vlotho
Dates: Apr. 14, 21, 28
Limit: 12 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: St. Joseph Parish Convent

Learn to make bird houses and feeders from gourds.


YOUR BODY NEXT YEAR (R)

Course No. 56
Presenters: Nate Vandervest, Jim Beversdorf
Coordinator: Loretta Brosig
Dates: Apr. 21, 28
Limit: 90 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Bellin College

Are you moving as well as you did 15 years ago? Would you like to? Come to this class and learn how to achieve optimal body movement. Bellin Health experts will give in-depth demonstrations on how they can assess and correct body movement patterns. This is your start to moving better by
next year.

BIKING RURAL ROADS (R)

Course No. 57
Presenter/Coordinator: Jimmie Clark
Dates: Apr. 21, 28; May 5, 12, 19
Limit: 40 Time: 10:00 am – 12 (fi rst two sessions); 10:00 am – 2 pm (last three sessions)
Location: Off Campus

We will bike trails and back roads in and out of the area. Bikers will be responsible for getting their bikes to the trailhead or starting point. Multi-speed bikes are recommended and HELMETS ARE REQUIRED. An “Assumption of Risk” form will be sent to you with your confirmation letter
and returned to the LIR Office prior to the start date. This biking course is an intense workout and be prepared to bike 20+ miles. The first session will meet at the Green Bay East Side YMCA on Huron Road. The remaining locations will be distributed at that session.


FROM TOTEM TO TEMPLE: THE EVOLUTION OF SACRED ARCHITECTURE OF SOUTHERN INDIA (N)

Course No. 58
Presenter: Kevin Cullen
Coordinators: Sue Johnson, Stu Hoar
Date: Apr. 28
Limit: 120 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Location: NPM

India is home to one of the most ancient and diverse architectural landscapes in the world. Th is course explores the evolution of sacred architecture in southern India, specifi cally in the state of Tamil Nadu. Delve into southern India’s rich history by investigating the continuity of sacred spaces from
simple shrines to magnifi cent temple complexes. Th e course content is drawn directly from the instructor’s research while living in India.


GREEN BAY BOTANICAL GARDEN GUIDED TOUR (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 59
Presenter: John Katalinich
Coordinator: Liz Katalinich
Date: May 12
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Green Bay Botanical Garden

Join John, GBBG member and experienced docent for a guided tour! Learn the history of the GBBG through behind the scenes staffing and volunteer efforts that have motivated the incredible growth of the garden. A walking tour of the grounds is included. This event will take place rain or shine.
An $8 admission fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received. (No Botanical Garden Membership Discounts apply).


IKEBANA (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 60
Presenter: Kazuko Bressler
Coordinator: Ginny Heim
Dates: May 12, 19
Limit: 25 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Bellevue Center

Ikebana is the Japanese art of arranging flowers using seasonal materials at hand. Learn about the history of Ikebana and a demonstration on the basics of Ikebana arrangements. The participants will work on Moribana arrangements. Moribana means to pile flowers so we pile or arrange flowers in a vase to create a miniature garden. A $15 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


MINIATURE GARDENING (N)

Course No. 61
Presenter: Leo Bordeleau
Coordinator: Myrna Dickenson
Date: May 26
Limit: 25 Time: 6 – 7:30 pm
Location: Rosehill Gardens

Participants may bring their own hypertufa planter (from previous class) or purchase one at the Gardens. Driving directions are available at www.rhgardens.com

 

Wednesday

“WITH MALICE - (CANCELLED)

Course No. 62
Presenter: Prof. Richard Stevens
Coordinator: Bev Shalkhauser
Date: Jan. 7
Limit: 90 Time: 1 – 3:30 pm Location: NRRM

This course explores the life of Abraham Lincoln as reflected by his time in Springfield, IL. Photos show the New Salem historic village
( reconstructed) of Lincoln’s youth in the 1830’s, Abe Lincoln’s home, as a young lawyer and the Mary Todd and Abe Lincoln Presidential Museum. Quotes from Lincoln’s statements reveal some of his ideas on the principles of American democracy and human rights.


THE PEOPLE OF HAITI: THEIR PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 63
Presenters: Jan Dooley, Fr. Larry Canavera
Coordinator: Annaliese Waggoner
Dates: Jan. 7, 14
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

As founder of The Friends of Haiti- Green Bay, listen to Father Larry and Jan, who has been part of the journey, as they present the origins of the Haitian struggle and the connection and commitment of FoH with the Haitian people. Historically, Haiti and its people have been mired in struggle
since the time of Columbus discovering the Americas. The early struggle included the importance of African slaves, 300 years of dominance, the fight
for freedom, the shunning by nations of our world and the oppression of a people. Today, the people of Haiti struggle for dignity, respect, acceptance,
freedom and survival. They deserve to have basic human needs met –healthcare, education, clean water and an opportunity to financially support themselves. What is Friends of Haiti and why? Come and see!


JEWISH CUSTOMS – AN ADVANCED ANALYSIS (N)

Course No. 64
Presenter: Rabbi Michoel Feinstein
Coordinator: Julie Arneth
Dates Jan. 7, 14, 21
Limit: 45 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Experience the practices, customs and beliefs of daily life in Authentic Judaism. “Question and Answer” session will follow each lecture. Ask what you have always wanted to know. (“Exploring Authentic Judaism” is a recommended prerequisite to this course.)

MAKE A BOOK: BOOK BINDING STYLES (R)

Course No. 65
Presenter: Kathleen Hackbarth
Coordinators: See Below
Dates: Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28; Feb. 4, 11
Limit: 12 Time: 10:30 am – 2:30 pm
Location: Bellevue Center

Come learn how to make your very own book from start to fi nish. Retired art teacher, Kathleen Hackbarth shares six bookbinding techniques listed below. No experience necessary. If you have a favorite paper or object you would like to use, feel free to bring it along and we will see how to make it
work. Everyone is encouraged to bring a brown bag lunch for yourself as we will work through four hours. Register for any or all sessions. Each session will count as one course. A fee of $12 will be payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.

Jan. 7 – A - Japanese Stab Bound Book: Coordinator: Janice Rickert - CLOSED
This beautiful style is also known as a hard-covered hinged book. You will be creating your book using book board, beautiful papers, glue, drills and waxed linen thread. This book makes a wonderful gift, journal, photo album, etc.

Jan. 14 – B - Coptic Stitch Book: Coordinator: Kathy Paquet
This style has an ancient history from Ethiopia. Creating it involves the use of stacked “signatures”, book board and hand sewing. The binding of this book is on the outside of the cover so all our stitching and beading will show.

Jan. 21 – C - Piano Hinge Book: Coordinator: Jim Huss
This is just a fun book to create and a delightful change from the “typical” bound book. There is no sewing or drilling as this creation is held together with shish-ka-bob skewers. We will be painting the skewers to coordinate with the cover paper and weave the tips to secure them in place.

Jan. 28 – D - Star Book: Coordinator: Laura Slater
The star book is more sculptural and very small. It can be used to hang from the ceiling or as a special card/book for a retirement or birthday for someone special as it is full of little pockets you can fill with notes or small objects. When finished it is in the shape of a large star.

Feb. 4 – E - Origami Folded Book: Coordinator: Sue Johnson - CLOSED
This style is truly unique. You will start with a 95 inch piece of paper, folding it many times and ending up with a doublesided book. Open one side
and you will have pages with two pockets. Open the other side and you find a file folder.

Feb. 11 – F - Hidden Message Book: Coordinator: Diane Wilson
This hard cover book goes back to the times of the Pony Express. It may look like a regular book but look closer! If you remove part of the binding, there is a secret place inside to hold documents (or a treasure map) that you wouldn’t want anyone else to see. It is a very unique way of binding a book.

A BETTER BAG OF GROCERIES (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 66
Presenter: Lauren Lindsley, RDN, CD
Coordinator: Bev Shalkhauser, Karen Wojahn
Date: Jan. 14
Limit: 150 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 250

Is Greek yogurt really better than regular yogurt? What type of peanut butter should I buy? Join Festival’s Registered Dietitian, Lauren Lindsley, as
she discusses the NuVal Nutritional Scoring System available at Festival Foods, along with other helpful hints to make your way through the grocery
store while avoiding common pitfalls. What you learn will help you spare your wallet and your waistline! Come ready to ask all of your food and nutrition questions!


INCOME STRATEGIES AND PROTECTING YOUR WEALTH (R)

Course No. 67
Presenter: Jerry Gillespie
Coordinator: Laura Slater
Dates: Jan. 14, 21, 28; Feb. 4
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 230

Over a four session course, multiple topics will be covered including but not limited to the following: income production and growth strategies in retirement, organizing your wealth and estate planning, health care costs, outliving your money and doing it yourself vs choosing an advisor. This is a participatory class with questions and discussions encouraged.

TECHNIQUES IN OIL PAINTING OF LANDSCAPE PAINTINGS (N)

Course No. 68
Presenter: Jim Oleniczak
Coordinator: Liz Katalinich
Dates: Jan. 14, 21, 28; Feb. 4, 11
Limit: 15 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: Art Garage

Techniques include: color mixing, opaque to transparent color, composition, placement of the subject and how a limited palette gives unity to a painting. Theory of painting will be discussed as well as the most difficult part, when to stop.


WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT RESISTANCE TRAINING (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 69
Presenter: Karl Huebner
Coordinator: Jan Rickert
Date: Jan. 28
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Material covered in this course, but not limited to, will include: research-supported evidence why everyone from the young to mature adults should include resistance exercises in their training; specific exercises you should be doing and which ones to avoid. A discussion about proper form and
technique will be included.


ONEIDA CULTURE AND HER STORY (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 70
Presenter: Randy Cornelius
Coordinator: Jim Hinckley
Dates: Jan. 28; Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

This course is designed to expand the student’s knowledge of the Oneida Nation’s culture and history. Topics covered but not limited to include:
The Creation Story; The Thanksgiving Address; How the Clans came to be; How the Ceremonies came to be; The Great Law-Traditional Governance. From these traditional teachings spew the beliefs, values and attitudes of the Oneida people. Contemporary Oneida history will explore their prophecies and how Federal policies have impacted their identity and sovereignty.


MEDIATION SKILLS TO NAVIGATE MISUNDERSTANDINGS AND CONFLICT (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 71
Presenter: Laura Smythe
Coordinator: Barbara Beaver
Dates: Feb. 4, 11, 18
Limit: 35 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Most of us communicate and assume we are understood. However, misunderstandings and conflicts abound! Mediation is a collaborative and constructive conflict resolution process. Learn some key communication skills utilized in mediation to both prevent and manage conflicts.


WINGS OF MORNING: THE AIR WAR OVER EUROPE 1941 -1945 (R)

Course No. 72
Presenter: Robert Cook
Coordinator: Judy Hodel
Dates: Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25; *Mar. 4
Limit: 100 Time: 1-3 pm/*1 – 3:30 pm
Location: National Railroad Museum

In 1942 -1943 Joseph Stalin was complaining that the only people killing or being killed by the Germans were the Russians. He was wrong.
During that period of time tens of thousands of men flying bombers for the RAF and the USAAF had died in the skies over Germany. They had
carried the war to the German homeland. This course will discuss the strategy, weapons, tactics and results of the air war over Germany from 1941 -1945. The last class will be 30 minutes longer in order to view the movie 12:00 O’Clock High and need the extra time for discussion.


SENIOR ZUMBA GOLD (R)

Course No. 73
Presenter: Paul Schneider
Coordinators: Session A: Barbara Beaver; Session B: Laura Slater
Dates: Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25; Mar. 4, 11
Limit: 50 Time: Session A: 1 – 2 pm ; Session B: 2 – 3 pm
Location: YWCA

Zumba Gold is a low-impact, low–intensity fitness dance class. Latin and other international rhythms are used to create a fun and easy to follow workout. Light clothes and tennis shoes are appropriate attire. Choose Session A or B; do not choose both.

RAILROAD TECHNOLOGY 201 (N)

Course No. 74
Presenter: Robert Lettenberger
Coordinator: John Arneth
Dates: Feb. 11, 18, 25; Mar. 4
Limit: 90 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: NRRM

We know what a freight train looks like today. We have ideas about increased passenger rail service. What will the railroads of the future look like? In Railroad Technology 201, we’ll explore the inner workings of future trains; what direction railroad technology is heading and its impact on our
world. Our discussion will not only look at the rail vehicles, but will also include what goes on behind the scenes of what we see coming down the tracks. A $10 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


PENCIL DRAWING FOR LIFE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 75
Presenter: Jim Briggs
Coordinator: Wes Carvenough
Dates: Feb. 11, 18, 25; Mar. 4, 11, 18
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Location: Art Garage

Learn how to draw with a variety of materials beginning with carbon pencils and eventually shifting into colored pencils if you choose. Composition and drawing techniques will be demonstrated to further your skills.


RECREATIONAL MUSIC MAKING I (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 76
Presenter: Mary Vandersteen
Coordinator: Jane Hyduke
Dates: Feb. 18, 25; Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25
Limit: 6 Time: 10:30 am – 12
Location: Heid Music, 2605 S. Oneida St.

If you’ve always wanted to play the piano and wish to learn at a fast pace, this course is for you. You will learn keyboard geography, note reading and rhythm. A $25 fee due for materials payable to UW-Green Bay when your confirmation is received.


RECREATIONAL MUSIC MAKING II (R)

Course No. 77
Presenter: Mary Vandersteen
Coordinator: Jane Hyduke
Dates: Feb. 18, 25; Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25
Limit: 6 Time: 1:00 – 2:30 pm
Location: Heid Music, 2605 S. Oneida St.

For those with some piano background, even if you think you have forgotten it all, and wish to learn more, this course is for you. Learn keyboard geography, reading notes, and rhythm. A $25 fee due for materials will be payable to UW-Green Bay when your confirmation is received.


SOUTHERN SAMPLER OF WOMEN’S NOVELS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 78
Presenter: Prof. Sidney Bremer
Coordinator: Stella Frigo
Dates: Feb. 18, Mar. 4, 18, Apr. 1
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Read, relish and discuss a diverse sampler of classic twentieth century novels written by women –two black, one white – from the American South.
Our first session will introduce us to the South and our books, to each other, and to a short story by white Mississippian Eudora Welty. We’ll then
discuss (in this order): Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937); Carson McCuller’s The Member of the Wedding (1946);
Alice Walker’s The Color Purple (1982).


AORTIC ANEURYSMS AND WHAT VASCULAR SCREENINGS CAN TELL YOU (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 79
Presenter: Prevea Vascular Surgeon
Coordinator: Jim Hinckley
Date: Feb. 25
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Learn about the anatomy of aneurysms, their complications and detection. Learn what vascular screenings tell about aneurysms and how they are performed.

POLITICS, GOVERNMENT AND CIVILITY: WISCONSIN AND THE NATION (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 80
Presenter: Prof. Michael Kraft
Coordinators: Julie Arneth, Janice Rickert
Date: Feb. 25
Limit: 120 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: NPM

This course will explore the role of politics and government in Wisconsin and the nation over the past several years. It reviews many of the state and national trends that have affected relations between two major parties and policymaking processes on issues as diverse as energy, environment, health
care, and tax reform. It also asks what might be done to reestablish bipartisan cooperation and civility in what has been a highly divisive political
process that erodes public confidence in government.


BEGINNING QUILTING (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 81
Presenters: Beverly Braun, Barb Berg
Coordinator: Sue Johnson
Dates: Mar. 4, 11
Limit: 10 Time: 9:00 am – 12
Location: Julie’s Sewing Center

In this beginning quilting course, you will make a table runner consisting of three quilt blocks. Th e table runner top will be completed in class with instructions for completing the project on your own (hand quilting, machine quilting and long arm quilting plus binding). Th e kit includes instructions,
materials to make the top, backing and the binding but does not include the batting. Each participant is asked to bring a working sewing machine plus owner’s manual, rotary cutter, cutting mat, sewing ruler and straight pins. A fee of $20 is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is
received.


POTPOURRI (C)

Course No. 82
Presenters: Various community of Brown County members
Coordinators: Mary Eisenreich, Penny Bakeslee, Janette Meverden, Zeta Turriff
Dates: Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25
Limit: 150 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Mauthe Center
Each class will have a different presenter on a diverse subject. Subjects will refl ect a wide variety of interests from the arts to community concerns.
Join us for some interesting topics.

BEGINNING SPANISH II (C)

Course No. 83
Presenters: Marilyn Secor, Lyla Meade
Coordinator: Del Tills
Dates: Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25; Apr. 1, 8
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

This course will briefly review the content of Beginning Spanish I. It will add new vocabulary and grammar. There will be practice through short conversations, worksheets, games and songs. Th e text book is Spanish for Gringos, Level One, 2nd Edition published by Barron’s. It is also available
with a CD

BEGINNING SPANISH III (C)

Course No. 84
Presenters: Marilyn Secor, Kathy Jerry
Coordinator: Del Tills
Dates: Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25; Apr. 1, 8
Limit: 15 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

This course will review the content of Beginning Spanish II and add new vocabulary and grammar. There will be practice through conversations, assignments and games. We will continue using Spanish for Gringos, Level One, 2nd Edition by Barron’s as the textbook. Supplemental workbooks (TBD) will be ordered the first day of class.


METAPHYSICAL/ENERGY HEALING (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 85
Presenter: Del Cornette, D.M.
Coordinator: Patty Payette
Dates: Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25; Apr. 1, 8
Limit: 30 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Bellevue Community Center

The instructor has twenty five years experience as an energy healer/practitioner and wrote his Doctoral Dissertation on Energy Healing. The healing energies of a variety of indigenous and Christian people will be presented. Class participation, questions and discussion will be encouraged.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT 201 (C)

Course No.86
Presenters: Dr. Reed Hardy, Jill Hardy
Coordinator: Judy Hodel
Dates: Mar. 4, 11, 18, 25; Apr. 1, 8, 15
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Mauthe Fireside Room

The Personal Development 201 course is a continuation of course 101 to further explore personal development theory and practice. The course will continue to survey the basic theories that underpin our current understanding of what personal development is, why it is an important issue for
older adults, and what a psychologically healthy person can do to maintain and enhance their psychological well-being. Personal Development 101 is a perquisite for this course.


TWO WOMEN OF ARTISTIC DISTINCTION (C)-CLOSED

Course No. 87
Presenters: Bev Smith, Judy Crain
Coordinators: Zeta Turriff , Janette Meverden, Penny Blakeslee
Dates: Mar. 4, 18
Limit: 120 Time: 1- 3 pm Location: NPM

Bev Smith and Judy Crain will bring to life two fascinating women of the past who are remembered for their creative contributions in the arts. Both women were often not understood in the times in which they lived, but they persevered and are recognized today for their signifi cant achievements.
Th e programs are delivered as staged readings with one of the presenters personifying the featured historical woman and the other acting as the interviewer/narrator.


FROM PEARL HARBOR TO NAGASAKI: THE AIR WAR IN THE PACIFIC (N)-CLOSED

Course 88
Presenter: Robert Cook
Coordinator: Jules Bader
Dates: Mar. 11, 18, 25; Apr. 1
Limit: 100 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: National Railroad Museum

While the Navy believed in the beginning of WWII that this would be a large fl eet confl ict, it turned out to be fought by carrier aircraft. Th e strategic bombing of Japan turned out to be very diff erent from that of Europe. We will look at the planes, major battles and controversies relating to this part
of World War II.


I GOT A SMART PHONE (ANDROID) – NOW WHAT? (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 89
Presenter: Justin Geitner, Camera Corner
Coordinator: Barry Burrows
Date: Mar. 18
Limit: 30 Time: 9:30 – 11:30 am
Location: Camera Corner

This is a beginner level class designed to give you a better understanding of your Android smartphone. The class provides an overview of basic features: calling, web browsing, mapping, and more.


THE BED SHOW (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 90
Presenter: Stephen Perkins
Coordinator: Connie Korger
Date: Mar. 18
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Lawton Gallery (Th eater Hall 230)

The “Bed Show” will be an exhibition that explores the place of the bed in your lives and the many diff erent functions that it serves. I will be seeking artwork from diff erent groups of people in the Green Bay area and the installation will be a non-traditional one with various parts of the exhibit that
requires audience participation. Quite frankly, I have no idea how it’s going to turn out but it should be fun, sexy, serious, humorous and above all engaging. No sleeping bags required, but bring an open mind!

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE NUCLEAR RENAISSANCE? THE IMPACT OF KEWAUNEE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SHUTDOWN (N)

Course No. 91
Presenter: Prof. Michael Kraft
Coordinators: Bob Fischer, Jim Huss
Date: Mar. 18
Limit: 120 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: NPM

For the past decade or more, many have looked forward to the resurgence of nuclear power, particularly because it is a major, centralized source of electricity generation that produces few greenhouse gases that are linked to climate change. However, the nuclear renaissance exists primarily
in Asia and not in the United States, where until a year ago we have seen no new nuclear plants proposed and built for over three decades. Four reactors are now under construction in Georgia and South Carolina, but four have closed in the last year, including the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant
in Wisconsin. This course explores these developments and offers some explanations for why nuclear power continues to face significant hurdles today. It also reviews the particular circumstances that led to the Kewaunee plant shutdown and the implications for Northeastern Wisconsin.


ETHNIC EASTER BAKING AT KEWAUNEE HERITAGE FARM (R)

Course No. 92
Presenter: JoAnn Vogal
Coordinators: Session A: Laura Slater Session B: Karen Wojahn
Date: Mar. 25
Limit: 18 Time: Session A: 8:00 am – 1 pm; Session B: 9:00 am – 2 pm
Location: Kewaunee Heritage Farm

Easter Baking with Grandma – sweet raised dough bunnies, Trinity bread and filled coffee cakes. JoAnn and her co-baker have over 100 years of experience baking sweet raised dough. We will teach you the methods your grandmothers used to make their wonderful treats. Snacks and lunch are included. A $40 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received. Choose Session A or B; do not choose both.


I GOT AN iPHONE – NOW WHAT? (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 93
Presenter: Kevin Bassett - Camera Corner
Coordinator: Connie Korger
Date: Mar. 25
Limit: 30 Time: 9:30 – 11:30 am
Location: Camera Corner

This is a beginner level class providing basic overview of buttons and their functions, screens on the iPhone, browsing and downloading apps, mail and basic troubleshooting.


CHALLENGE LGBT ELDERS EXPERIENCE IN GREEN BAY WITH AGING ISSUES (N)

Course No. 94
Presenter: Stacie Christian
Coordinator: Lynn Baumgartner
Date: Apr. 15
Limit: 50 Time: 9:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

The UWGB Pride Center will share current issues facing the elder LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) Community and what the UWGB Pride does. A viewing of the award winning film “Gen Silent” which addresses what happens as they grow older and need to seek assistance with
medical and long term care. Class discussion after the film is encouraged.


OPTIONS FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING (R)

Course No. 95
Presenter: Tom Diedrick
Coordinators: Session A: Gloria Gaie; Session B: Connie Korger
Date: Apr. 15
Limit: 30 Time: Session A: 10:00 am – 12/ Session B: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Options Showcase Model Home

This course is an opportunity to learn about Options for Independent Living and its unique services for people with disabilities and those who are older. Participants will tour Options David L. Hall Showcase Model Home and Office Complex. The facility features 5 bathrooms with different
features and adaptive bathing alternatives, a kitchen with adapted cooking aids, a technology room with numerous telecommunications aids and telephones for people with different levels of hearing loss and an accessible garden. An emphasis on accessibility and universal design in residential
housing is the course goal. Sign up for Session A or B; do not sign up for both.

TRY FOOD FROM INDIA WITH SAJIDA (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 96
Presenter: Sajida Shariff
Coordinator: Ginny Heim
Date: Apr. 15
Limit: 25 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: FPC – Banner Hall

The best way to experience a culture is through their food. This is your opportunity to try the food of India. Bring a small container for possible leftovers?


ELEMENTS: FROM THE BIG BANG TO THE PERIODIC TABLE (N)

Course No. 97
Presenter: Gary Dallman
Coordinator: Karen Dallman
Dates: Apr. 15, 22
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

This course combines two previous courses dealing with elements. The visible world is made from various combinations of fundamental building blocks called atoms. The first session traces those origins from the Big Bang to stellar life cycles. The second session deals with the organization of the
elements on the periodic table.


REVISITING EARTH DAY: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND POLITICS IN 2014 (R)

Course No. 98
Presenter: Prof. Michael Kraft
Coordinator: Jim Huss
Date: Apr. 22
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Recognition of environmental challenges each year on Earth Day is a longstanding and useful practice. There is much media coverage, and yet the
Earth Day rituals are not sufficient to build an informed citizenry and to create enough demand for changes in societal practices to make a big difference.
The one-day course will introduce the broad array of contemporary environmental problems facing the nation and the world and highlight the kinds of changes that will be needed in the coming decades to deal with them. The focus will be on public policy actions and the political processes
that affect the way policies are formulated, approved and implemented in the United States.


RESTORING ISLANDS IN GREEN BAY – THE IMPACTS OF RESTORATION OF RENARD ISLAND AND THE CAT ISLAND CHAIN (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 99
Presenter: Mark Walter
Coordinator: Sue Sorenson
Date: May 13
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

The Cat Island Restoration Project involves reconstructing three islands in the lower bay, which provide habitat for shorebirds, waterfowl, amphibians, turtles, invertebrates and furbearing mammals. A tour of the islands will take place in the afternoon. Participants are responsible to meet at the site
for the tour in the afternoon. A map will be sent with your confirmation letter.


DON’T GET TICKED: LYME DISEASE INFORMATION AND PREVENTION (R)

Course No. 100
Presenter: Ben Nelson
Coordinator: Jan LaSota
Date: May 13
Limit: 50 Time: 1:00 – 2:30 pm
Location: Wildlife Sanctuary

Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States. In Wisconsin, the statewide average incidence of Lyme disease has more than tripled in the past 19 years. Learn about the most common ticks in Wisconsin that carry Lyme disease, ways to avoid them, and
what to do and watch for if you get bitten by one. A fee of $7.50 per person will be payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


ENHANCING OUR EXPERIENCE OF NATURE THROUGH POETRY (N)

Course No. 101
Presenter: Gillian Dale
Coordinator: Laura Slater
Date: May 13
Limit: 50 Time: 1 - 3 pm Room: RH 220

To welcome Spring we will read and briefly discuss a number of poems dealing with our relationship to the rest of the natural world—observing and responding to plants and animals or reflecting on our place in the natural scene. We will include some classic authors such as Christopher Smart,
A. E. Housman, Emily Dickinson and G.M. Hopkins as well as modern poets such as William Carlos Williams, Wendell Berry, Mary Oliver, David Waggoner, Lisel Mueller and Louise Gluck.


BIKING FOR WUSSES (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 102
Presenter: Mary Cook
Coordinator: Judy Sarasin
Dates: May 13, 20, 27; June 3
Limit: 25 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Off Campus

If it has been awhile since you have ridden that bike in your garage and you would like to get back on the trail, this class is for you. Rides will be under 10 miles on paved, flat, local trails. Bikers will be responsible for getting their bikes to the trailhead. Experienced riders looking for a short mid-week
ride with a friendly group are also welcome. HELMETS ARE REQUIRED. An Assumption of Risk form will be sent with your confirmation letter. Please fill it out and return it to the address on the form. A State Trail Pass will be required for some rides. An itinerary with directions for each ride will be sent with your confirmation letter.


RECYCLING AND RESOURCE RECOVERY – CHANGES IN THE WAY YOUR WASTE IS HANDLED. (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 103
Presenter: Mark Walter
Coordinator: Sue Sorenson
Date: May 20
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

The manner in which communities are getting rid of their solid waste is changing. The focus now is on recovery of as much of the waste stream as possible. A tour of the facility will take place in the afternoon. Participants are responsible to meet at the tour site in the afternoon. A map will be sent
with your confirmation letter.

Thursday


DEVELOP YOUR INTUITION: THE HIGHEST FORM OF KNOWING (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 104
Presenter: Etienne Pait
Coordinator: Terry Blaser
Date: Jan. 8
Limit: 40 Time: 9:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Discover your innate intuitive ability. Recognize what blocks there are to receiving your intuitive flow, and discover ways to directly apply intuition in your daily life.


“NOTES OF THANKSGIVING: GRATITUDE TO MY TEACHERS” (N)

Course No. 105
Presenter: Bishop Robert Morneau
Coordinator: Mary Cook, Barbara Beaver
Date: Jan. 8
Limit: 120 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: NPM

All of us have had teachers and mentors on our journey. They deserve our gratitude for sharing their wisdom and how we are to live. It is never too
late to express our gratitude! In this session, I will share insights of ten teachers who deserve my thanks: such teachers as St. Augustine and Alan Paton,
Douglas Steere and Evelyn Underhill, Dag Hammarskjjold and Brigid E. Herman, Erich Fromm and C. S. Lewis, Diedrich Bonhoeffer and
St. Therese de Lisieux.


ROLE OF WOMEN IN CHRISTIANITY: 30 A.D. to 310 A.D. (R)

Course No. 106
Presenter: Benjamin Cruz-Uribe
Coordinator: Janice Rickert, Patty Payette
Dates: Jan 8, 15, 22
Limit: 150 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Kroc Center

This course will be an historical (not theological) overview as to how women were the impetus behind the spectacular growth of early Christianity from 30 A.D. to 310 A.D. The lectures will look into why pagan women joined the early Christian movement and how their participation fueled the
spread of Christianity across the Roman Empire.

JUDGES UNROBED – HAVE GAVEL WILL TRAVEL (C)-CLOSED

Course No. 107
Presenter: Mark Warpinski
Coordinator: Ed Smith, Nancy McGrew
Date: Jan. 15
Limit: 150 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 250

How do you get to Court and what happens when you get there? We will unravel some of the mysteries behind lawsuits. How is a lawsuit started and when does it end? In this course we will explore the process of a lawsuit in areas of civil litigation, family law, juvenile law, mental health and
probate. This will be an audience participation course where you may be called on to “wear the robe and be judicial”. (Robe and gavel will be provided!)


BOOKS AND YOU (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 108
Presenter: Mary Johnson
Coordinator: Carol Parrot
Dates: Jan 15; Feb 12; Mar 12; Apr 16; May 14
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Location: FPC - Memorial

Members are invited to share their current readings or discuss the chosen reading assigned. We explore various genre in literature, such as mysteries, novels, and non-fiction. We also may select a specific author or book. This is a relaxed class. The January reading will be any book by John Green.


CHINESE COOKING FOR AMERICAN TASTE (C)-CLOSED

Course No. 109
Presenter: Kelly Dadam
Coordinator: Sheila Tomac
Dates: Jan. 15; Feb. 19; Mar. 19; Apr. 16; May 21
Limit: 8 Time: 9:00 am – 12:30 pm
Location: FPC – Banner Hall

Basic Chinese cooking done with American taste in mind. We will prepare and enjoy a meal of basic Chinese cooking done with American taste in mind. A $25 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


FROM THE MASS TO THE FOX: NORBERTINE BEGINNINGS IN PACKERLAND (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 110
Presenter: Andrew Ciferni, O.Praem, Ph.D.
Coordinator: Janice Rickert
Date: Jan. 22
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

As Director of the Center for Norbertine Studies at St. Norbert College, Father Andrew will present the story of Abbot Bernard Pennings and the arrival of the Norbertines on the Belgian Peninsula in 1893. That foundation would become the St. Norbert Abbey and St. Norbert College.


COMMUNICATION IS TRICKIER THAN YOU THINK! LEARN TWO KEY SKILLS TO COMMUNICATE MORE EFFECTIVELY (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 111
Presenter: Laura Smythe
Coordinator: Myrna Dickenson
Dates: Jan. 22, 29
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

This course addresses two key skills for effective communication: ethical communication and practical negotiation. We will explore how ethical communication makes it possible to respectfully and comfortably discuss value-laden topics such as religion and politics. We will also discuss practical negotiation skills. All of us negotiate something every day. Learn how to do it more efficiently, respectfully and productively.


PREVENTIVE CARE FOR BACK AND NECK PAIN (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 112
Presenter: Pam Buergie
Coordinator: Bev Shalkhauser
Date: Jan. 29
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Learn the signs and symptoms of back and neck pain. Learn how to prevent them and to recognize when they become a surgical concern.

REVISIT A CLASSIC SHORT WORK OF FICTION (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 113
Presenter: Mary Kay Dodson
Coordinator: Kathy Daley
Date: Jan. 29
Limit: 25 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

The work of fiction for this Spring is Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea. This timeless tale is frequently read today, not only because of the old man’s relationship to the sea, but also the depth of meaning it conveys. Using a discussion format, we will focus on those two areas along with other literary components such as symbolism and characterization. Please read this masterpiece before the class meets and note any quotes which strike you as interesting or intriguing.


TRUST: GRACEFULLY WALKING THROUGH YOUR FEARS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 114
Presenter: Etienne Pait
Coordinator: Janice Rickert
Date: Feb. 5
Limit: 40 Time: 9:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Learn how to define the truth of what “trust, faith, surrender and sacrifice” really is and discover the simple four stages of trust.


CHOCOLATE (R)-CLOSED - BOTH SESSIONS

Course No. 115
Presenters: Jim Seroogy, Marjorie Hitchcock
Coordinators: Session A: Carol DeGroot; Session B: Mary Johnson
Date: Feb. 5
Limit: 20 Time: Session A: 10:00 am – 12/ Session B: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Seroogy Chocolates, DePere

Chocolates, caramels, clusters, crèmes, chewies galore! Discover how, for over 100 years, Seroogy’s chocolates has been creating these confections. Learn where chocolate comes from and how it is processed. The class includes a tour and samples. Choose Session A or B; do not choose both.


THE RIESLING GRAPE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 116
Presenter: Allan Callahan
Coordinator: Lynn Baumgartner
Date: Feb. 5
Limit: 40 Time: 2 – 4 pm Location: Village Grill

The Riesling grape, thought by some to be the noble grape, is probably the least appreciated grape variety. This course will explore the complexities
of the grape. An opportunity for tasting the Riesling grape from around the world will be available as an after class experience. This will be presented
as a cash bar payable to the Village Grill.


THE CASE FOR PALESTINE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 117
Presenter: Prof. Jerrold Rodesch
Coordinator: Laura Slater
Dates: Feb. 19, 26; Mar. 5, 12 (Change in dates from catalog)
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

The Middle East has been fraught with tension and war during the past century. The conflict between Arab Palestinians and the state of Israel remains unresolved. This course will review the histories of the British Mandate, Israel and the Palestinians. We will examine why the Palestinians long
rejected two states, why the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) eventually accepted a two-state solution, and whether this solution, long supported by the United States, is still possible. The showing of a film “The Gatekeepers” will conclude the course.


JOHN ERICSSON, INVENTOR AND ENGINEER SUPREME (N)

Course No. 118
Presenter: Richard Carlstedt
Coordinator: Kate Wiers
Date: Feb. 19
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Engaged in a life of total creativity, John is most noted for inventing and building the ironclad USS Monitor during the Civil War and possibly saving the Union. He developed and built many successful machines that impacted the Industrial Revolution of the 19th Century and we will explore these
and other achievements. The many facets of this Swedish American’s life will be documented including a personality that did not make him endearing
to many. Experience a portrait of a genius gone, but never to be forgotten.

LEARNING TO PLAY CRIBBAGE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 119
Presenter: Pat Fuge
Coordinator: Sue Johnson
Dates: Feb. 19, 26
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Gnome Games

Cribbage is one of the best two-handed card games and has been entertaining players since the 17th Century. It is one of the most popular card games in the English speaking world. Cribbage affords players both the anticipation of the luck of the deal as well as ample opportunity to exercise their skills in discarding and using the “Cribbage Board” for scoring rather than the usual pencil and paper. You will learn the basics of play, scoring and 2-3 player Cribbage and enjoy a morning of “pegging out with the Gnomes.”


MEDICAL BILLING EXPLAINED AND SELECTING A MEDICARE PLAN (N)

Course No. 120
Presenter: Gary Lewins
Coordinator: Jean Watson
Date: Feb. 26
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

This program will have two sections. Section one will explain medical billing and include what you need to know prior to, at the time of service and understanding your insurance explanation of benefi ts (EOB). The second portion will explain the different Medicare options including how to decide
if regular Medicare or an Advantage Plan is right for you.


SCHROEDERS FLORAL – HOW WE DO IT (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 121
Presenter: Peggy Schroeder
Coordinator: Jan Rickert
Dates: Feb. 26; Apr. 2
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 – 11:30 am
Location: Schroeder Greenhouse

Come out to our warehouse and see how we start our plants, then come back in April to see how they are growing. Directions will be provided with your confirmation letter.

WHO AM I? WHY AM I HERE? (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 122
Presenter: Etienne Pait
Coordinator: Joyce Dirschl
Date: Mar. 5
Limit: 40 Time: 9:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Explore what memories are stored in your cells and how these “cellular memories” dictate the habits, patterns and beliefs that govern and guide interactions and responses every day.


GUADALCANAL: WAR IN THE PACIFIC (N)

Course No. 123
Presenter: Randy Johnson
Coordinators: Bob Fischer, Jules Bader
Dates: Mar. 5, 12, 19
Limit: 120 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: NPM

We will discuss the commanders, war equipment and military tactics used in the land, air and sea segments of the Pacific.


FINANCIAL FORENSICS –WHAT’S IN YOUR PORTFOLIO? (R)

Course No. 124
Presenters: Roger Deets, Nick Letter, Rebecca Agamaite
Coordinator: Jim Huss
Dates: Mar. 5, 12, 19, 26
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

This course is designed to help you decipher a mutual fund prospectus, insurance contracts, electronically traded funds (ETF) and much more. Discover why knowing what to look for is so important to your financial health. A must course for anyone trying to understand investments.


INTRODUCTORY EMBROIDERY (N)

Course No. 125
Presenter: Karen Wojahn
Coordinator: Gloria Gaie
Dates: Mar. 5, 12, 19, 26; Apr. 2, 9
Limit: 24 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: FPC – Banner Hall

The Embroiders’ Guild of America Stitching Series is a six week introductory embroidery course. Techniques covered are cross stitch, surface embroidery, canvas and hardanger. During the first four weeks, a different technique will be introduced weekly, and during the last two weeks
students work on a project in one of the techniques. EGA Guild members will help teach. A $10 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registration status is received.


ALL ABOUT WISCONSIN CHEESE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 126
Presenters: Peter Leuer, Cindy Schmidt
Coordinator: Nancy McGrew
Date: Mar. 12
Limit: 30 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Festival Foods, DePere

This course will present an overview of the History of Wisconsin Cheese and how cheese is made. Recipes will be available. Cheese sampling will take place ending with fresh mozzarella stretching. Location: Conference Room at Festival Foods, 1001 Main Street, DePere. An elevator is available for your convenience.


GEROTRANSCENDENCE 5 (C)

Course No. 127
Presenter: Dr. David Donarski
Coordinator: Patty Payette
Dates: Mar. 12, 19, 26
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

In this continuing course directed at looking into the stages of life, with the emphasis on the later stages, we will cover topics of sleep hygiene, dreams, the diseases of aging and other topics will be discussed. An emphasis on fall prevention, dealing with stress and pain as well as the need for continuing
physical and mental activity will be covered. Some basic brain functions and advances in the neurosciences and therapies will be addressed. This is an interactive course and questions are encouraged.


WILDLIFE REHABILITATION AT THE BAY BEACH WILDLIFE SANCTUARY (N)

Course No. 128
Presenters: Lori Bankson, Matt Rupnik
Coordinator: Betty Cicero
Date: Mar. 19
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Wildlife Sanctuary

Learn how WLS cares for over 5,000 orphaned, injured and ill wildlife, from the point when found to their release. Also learn tips on helping wildlife in your backyard and how to become a sub-permitee wildlife rehabilitator at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary. A PowerPoint lecture for 1 hour with
Q&A and meeting with animal ambassadors for second hour. Presented by Curator of Animals and Senior Animal Keeper. A fee of $10 is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.

LEARNING TO PLAY CHESS (R)

Course No. 129
Presenter: Pat Fuge
Coordinator: Judy Hastert
Dates: Mar. 19, 26; Apr. 2
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Gnome Games

Chess is one of the oldest classic 2-player strategic board games in the world having been a part of the world game culture since the 6th Century. Played on a 64 square board with 16 pieces per player that includes a King, Queen, Rooks, Bishops, Knights, Pawns – each with a unique movement
that are used to capture your opponent’s pieces and force them in to “Checkmate.” Over the 3 days you will learn how each of the pieces move, capture and experience the basics of the game.


CAROLE KING: THE SINGER AND THE WRITER (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 130
Presenter: Mary Eisenreich
Coordinators: Penny Blakeslee, Janette Meverden, Zeta Turriff
Date: Mar. 26
Limit: 250 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Kroc Auditorium

Carole King is one of the most successful female singer-songwriters of our time. She is known as a “natural” woman and her songs tell us about her life as an artist, mother and the woman she is today.


OUR TRIP TO CHINA – JANUARY 2014 (N)

Course No. 131
Presenters: Terry & Nancy McGrew
Coordinators: Sue Johnson, Bev Shalkhauser
Date: Mar. 26
Limit: 200 Time: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Kroc Auditorium

Our journey to China included Shanghai, animal preserves in Chengdu and Haillin and the ice festival in Harbin. We also visited Beijing and the Great Wall followed by Guillin and Hong Kong. Come join us as we relive an exciting trip.

ART BOOT CAMP PAINTING (R)

Course No. 132
Presenter: Susan Parsons
Coordinator: Mary Beth Wergin
Dates: Apr. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; May 7, 14
Limit: 25 Time: 9:30 am – 12
Location: Art Garage

Are your art supplies and unfinished paintings of oil, watercolor and acrylics, getting any attention? This class is for students who want to “pick up where they left off ”. You supply your own materials and complete what you have started but never finished. Bring in a canvas, board or paper and continue your exploration of the art medium or mediums you have worked on before. Susan is there to help class members with questions and offer suggestions.


LIVING FROM THE HEART (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 133
Presenter: Etienne Pait
Coordinator: Laura Slater
Date: Apr. 9
Limit: 40 Time: 9:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Identify habit patterns that are impeding your full expression. Discover what is really in your heart to be expressed and learn the relationship and impact the mind has on the heart’s ability to freely express itself.


LOST CHRISTIANITIES: 30 C.E. TO 310 C.E. (N)

Course No. 134
Presenter: Ben Cruz-Uribe
Coordinators: Bob Fischer, Mary Schuster
Dates: Apr. 9, 16, 23
Limit: 200 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: Kroc Aud

This course will be an historical overview of the various sects that made up early Christianity and try to answer the following questions: How many
different Christianities were there? What were their belief systems? How were they different? Where were they located? Why did they exist?
And which one (or which parts of each one) became what we call the modern Orthodox Christianity?

TATTING 101 (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 135
Presenter: Sr. Agnes Fischer
Coordinator: Dianne Briggs
Dates: Apr. 9, 16, 23, 30; May 7, 21
Limit: 10 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

This course is only for beginning tatters. Attendees will need one or two tatting shuttles and small scissors. Each participant will need a Clover #479 shuttle which may be purchased at Hobby Lobby.


TATTING 201 (R)

Course No. 136
Presenter: Sr. Agnes Fischer
Coordinator: Sharon Vlotho
Dates: Apr. 9, 16, 23, 30; May 7, 21
Limit: 15 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

This is a follow up to Tatting 101 and designed for intermediate or expert tatters. Attendees will need one or two tatting shuttles and small scissors.
The Clover #479 shuttle may bepurchased at Hobby Lobby.


TUDOR ENGLAND, PART II (N)

Course No. 137
Presenter: Barry Burrow, Ph.D.
Coordinator: Betty Stodola
Dates: Apr. 16, 30; May 7, 14, 21 (Date change from catalog)
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Mauthe Center

This course will be a continuation of the history of Tudor England begun in Part I. It will cover the reigns of the two Tudor Queens-Mary and Elizabeth. Mary’s reign was short and turbulent, as she tried to “turn the clock back.” It lasted a mere 5 years and upset almost all of England. Elizabeth,
her successor, spent much of her long, 45 year reign, restoring the stability hard won by the first two Henry’s. She also led England as it became a naval and world power. She was a very colorful monarch.

INTRODUCTION TO SPRING BIRD WATCHING (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 138
Presenter: Mike Reed
Coordinator: Nancy Whitfi eld
Date: May 7
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Wildlife Sanctuary

The North American spring bird migration is one of the largest mass movements of wildlife in the world. Join Wildlife Sanctuary Director Mike Reed
on a walk looking for and learning to identify some of the birds who make this remarkable journey. Binoculars and bird guides can be provided. A
$10 fee will be payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


BATTLE OF THE BULGE: HITLER’S LAST GAMBLE (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 139
Presenter: Randy Johnson
Coordinators: Bob Fischer, Jim Huss
Dates: May 7, 14, 21
Limit: 120 Time: 1 – 3 pm Location: NPM

We will discuss the commanders, war equipment and military tactics during 1944-1945.


GARDENS WITH PERSONALITY (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 140
Presenters: Tom & Vonnie Baye
Coordinators: Session A: Lynn Baumgartner; Session B: Mary Williams
Date: May 28
Limit: 25 Time: Session A: 10:00 am – 12; Session B: 1 – 3 pm
Location: Baye residence

See very special varieties of peonies, unique cultivars, dwarf conifers, etc. Learn how-to ideas with Tom: trough planters, do it yourself ideas and also deer damage control. A wonderful walk through a most beautiful garden. A map will be sent with your confirmation letter. Choose Session A or B; do not choose both.

Friday

YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY AND TOUR OF THE SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 141
Presenter: Sgt. Jody Lemmens
Coordinator: Connie Korger
Date: Jan. 9
Limit: 25 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Brown County Sheriff ’s Department

The course will cover issues of personal safety. Areas to be covered will include the differences between men and women and awareness with planning. Consideration of weapons, self-defense, mindset and target hardening will be addressed. Community influences and home security will be covered. A tour of the department will also be included.


INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 142
Presenters: Shirley Winnes, Sue Sorenson
Coordinator: Carol Joppe
Dates: Feb. 6, 13, 20
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Kroc Center Computer Lab

Learners will explore the physical computer, navigate the desktop and settings. Second session will be an introduction to Microsoft Word, a word processing program. The third session will be for practice. A $15 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay with registered status is received.


HEARTSAVER AED (N)

Course No. 143
Presenter: Jill Noffsinger
Coordinator: Janice McCarthy
Date: Feb. 13
Limit: 20 Time: 8:00 am – 12
Location: NWTC CB 124

American Heartsaver AED is a course designed to successfully train the student in the skills of choking, CPR and the use of an AED on Adult, Child and infant victims in a life threatening situation. All students successfully completing the training will receive an American Heart Association
Heartsaver AED course certification good for 2 years. A $24 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.

THE WAY WE DO DYING AND DEATH IN 2015 (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 144
Presenter: Ilene Cupit
Coordinator: Annaliese Waggoner
Date: Feb. 27
Limit: 40 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

The fact that people die still remains a taboo topic of discussion in our contemporary society. Yet, the many rapid changes that confront us demand
that we bring death “out of the closet.” This class will present technological advancements, medical practices and their ethics with regard to dying
and death as well as the isolation of people as they grieve. This overview will highlight some of our major contemporary concerns and bring forth an open dialog of what we must consider with regard to the end of life.


INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT WORD (R)

Course No. 145
Presenters: Shirley Winnes, Sue Sorenson
Coordinator: Ken Haugen
Dates: Mar. 6, 13
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Kroc Center Computer Lab

The basics of word will be presented to include creating, editing, formatting and saving documents. A $10 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


MESSAGE IS THE SAME (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 146
Presenter: Hamayun Mian
Coordinator: Dianne Briggs
Date: Mar. 13
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Green Bay Mosque

Learn about the Green Bay Mosque of the Islamic Society of Wisconsin.


SMART PHONE PHOTOGRAPHY (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 147
Presenter: Mark Amenson
Coordinator: Bridget Wade
Date: Mar. 13
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Want your photos to stand out? Get the tips and tricks to take photos that are the envy of your social media friends. We will also cover apps designed to edit and share directly from your smartphone (iPhone, Samsung, LG, HTC, Blackberry or Goggle smart phones.) Bring your smart phone to
class to use.


INTRODUCTION TO USING THE INTERNET (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 148
Presenters: Shirley Winnes, Sue Sorenson
Coordinator: Bob Fischer
Dates: Mar. 20, 27; Apr. 10
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Kroc Center Computer Lab

Learn to change the settings, remove Cookies and forward email. Facebook and searching will be covered. A $15 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when your confirmation is received.


HAND DISORDERS (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 149
Presenter: Dr. Daniel Metz
Coordinator: Barry Burrows
Date: Mar. 27
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH 220

The course will present the signs, symptoms and treatments for common hand and wrist disorders. Questions and discussions will be included.


UNLEASHING YOUR CREATIVITY NO MATTER WHAT AGE (DVD) (N)

Course No. 150
Presenter: Nana Cisler
Coordinator: Jan LaSota
Dates: Apr. 3, 10, 17, 24; May 1, 8, 15, 22
Limit: 40 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 220

Based on the lectures from “The Creative Thinkers Tool Kit”, “Creativity and the Older Adult” is explored with emphasis on the aging process. Lecture, discussions and activities to enhance your own creativity will be explored.


HOW TO USE EXCEL (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 151
Presenters: Shirley Winnes, Sue Sorenson
Coordinator: Joyce Dirschl
Dates: Apr. 24; May 1
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Kroc Center Computer Lab

Electronic spreadsheets can organize data. Learn to setup a spreadsheet with text and numbers, adding math to perform calculations. A $10 fee will be payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


BIKING IS FUN AT ANY AGE (C)

Course No. 152
Coordinators/Presenters: Bob & Mary Cook, Judy Hodel, Del Tills,
Dates: Apr. 24, May 1, 8, 15, 29
Limit: 40 Time: 10 am – 12 - First two sessions; 10 am – 2 pm- Last three sessions
Location: Off Campus

We bike trails and back roads in and out of the area. Bikers will be responsible for getting their bikes to the trailhead. Multi-speed bikes are recommended and HELMETS ARE REQUIRED. An Assumption of Risk form will be sent with your confirmation. Please fill it out and return it to
the address given on the form. A State Trail Pass will be required for some rides. An itinerary with directions for each ride will be sent with your
confirmation. NOTE: We will not ride on May 22 due to Memorial Day Weekend.


OLD MACDONALD HAD A FARM... BUT NOT LIKE THIS ONE (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 153
Presenter: Dan Brick
Coordinator: Conrad Reedy
Date: May 1
Limit: 20 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Brickstead Dairy Farm

How long has it been since you visited a dairy farm? If it hasn’t been since your childhood, you will be amazed at how they function today. Participants will enjoy a field trip to Brickstead Dairy Farm in the Askeaton area where Dan Brick will discuss this farming operation. You will learn about the
technology farmers utilize today as well as how complicated the business of farming has become.


HOW COLORS AFFECT YOU: WHAT SCIENCE REVEALS (DVD) (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 154
Presenter: Nana Cisler
Coordinator: Gail Devroy
Dates: May 1, 8, 15
Limit: 50 Time: 1 – 3 pm Room: RH230

There is more to color than just aesthetics. There’s an actual science behind how colors work on your eyes and brain. Thanks to recent research we now understand how our brains are affected by color. Learn how we can tap into their power to create environments and achieve a breathtaking range of visual goals.


INTRODUCTION TO THE GOLF SWING (N)-CLOSED

Course No. 155
Presenters: Jim Schultz, Kyle Christian
Coordinator: Jim Hinckley
Dates: May 1, 8, 15, 22
Limit: 12 Time: 10:00 – 11:30 am
Location: Oneida Country Club

During these sessions there will be a concentration on the basics of the golf swing. Additional topics will include basics of the game of golf such as course management, rules, etiquette, etc. Students will provide their own golf clubs. A non-refundable facility fee of $60 for four sessions will
be payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


156 HOW TO USE POWERPOINT (R)-CLOSED

Course No. 156
Presenters: Shirley Winnes, Sue Sorenson
Coordinator: Mary Cook
Date: May 8
Limit: 15 Time: 10:00 am – 12
Location: Kroc Center Computer Lab

Create presentations, slide shows and present them with style and impact. A $5 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received.


GET REAL, GET A PLAN: IT’S NOT THE 20TH CENTURY ANYMORE (N)

Course No. 157
Presenter: Jim Golembeski
Coordinator: Ken Loehlein
Date: May 8
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12 Room: RH 230

Join Jim Golembeski from Bay Area Workforce Development as he brings you up to date on the job skills needed for workers in the present time. He has his finger on the pulse of what’s happening in the Greater Green Bay area and what requirements workers will need in the near future.

Saturday

MEET ME AT THE OPERA (C)

Course No. 158
Presenter: Dianne Briggs
Coordinator: Nancy Whitfield
Date: Feb. 14
Limit: 50 Time: 10:45 am – 3 pm
Location: Bay Park Cinema

Let’s talk opera. Bring your expertise or your lack of operatic knowledge and join in the fun of the opera experience at Marcus Bay Park Cinema. On February 14, 2015 two operas will be shown: Lolanta by Peter Tchaikovsky, a one act opera and Bluebeard’s Castle by Bella Bartok. At 10:45 am we will meet in the theater and discuss high points of these two operas. Running time for the performance is 3 hours and 39 minutes. After the performance, we will have 30 minutes to discuss the pros and cons of each production. Each participant is responsible for purchasing their own tickets at Bay Park Cinema on the day of the viewing, tickets also available on-line.


Saturday/Monday


MAKE A HYPERTUFA PLANTER (R)-Session A - CLOSED

Course No. 159
Presenter: Leo Bordeleau
Coordinators: Session A: Mary Eisenreich; Session B: Janice Rickert
Dates: Session A: May 2 (SAT.)/ Session B: May 4 (MON.)
Limit: 12 Time: Session A: 10:00 – 12 / Session B: 6 – 8 pm
Location: Rosehill Gardens

Participants will make their own hypertufa planter on the site of Rosehill Gardens. All materials will be provided. Wear old clothes. A $30 fee is payable to UW-Green Bay when registered status is received. Choose Session A or B; do not choose both.

Two additional courses were added after the catalog went to print. They are listed below and both are on Friday.

NEW MEMBER WELCOME

Course No. 160                                              
Presenter:  Wes Carvenough
Coordinator:  Bonnie Meister
Date:  Jan. 9
Limit:  100  Time: 9:30 – 11:00
Location:  Mauthe Center

This course is for new members of Learning in Retirement.  As a new member you may have questions that need answering.  Come and join us for some refreshments and meet the officers of LIR and committee chairs.  We will give some general information and try to answer any of your questions regarding LIR.  This course does not count as one of your choices in your selections.  This course will meet in the Mauthe Center (Ecumenical Center) on campus.

UNITED STATES HISTORY, Part VI  (C)

Course No.  161                                 
Presenter:  Dennis Wojahn
Coordinator:  Karen Wojahn
Dates:  Mar. 6, 13, 20, 27; Apr. 3, 10
Limit: 50 Time: 10:00 am – 12  Room: RH 230

The history of the United States is a comprehensive look at the entire span of American history from the start of European settlement to the opening years of the 21st Century.  This is Part VI and features a Great Courses DVD followed by discussion and other insights into history after 1910.