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Department of Public & Environmental Affairs

What can you do with a major in Public Administration?

Use the following as an idea list, and remember that they represent some, but certainly not all, of the careers you might consider in Public Administration. Also keep in mind that many Public Administration majors pursue graduate studies in public administration, law, political science, social services, public policy, and public affairs.

The following list represents a few of the kinds of career titles for Public Administration majors:
Professional Administrator, Policy Analyst, City Manager, Educational Technology Policy Analyst, County Manager, Entry-level Analyst, Mid-level Analyst, Senior Analyst, Director of Finance, Contract Administration Manager, Chief Information Officer, Budget/Fiscal Analysis, Budget Assistant, College Professor/Instructor, Budget Specialist, Program Manager, Personnel Counselor, Health and Human Resource Specialist

Below is a list of positions that recent UW-Green Bay graduates have achieved:
Secretary to the Brown County Executive, Benefits Administrator, Human Resources Assistant, Human Resource Generalist, Commissioner, Environmental Planner, Executive Assistant, Clinic Business Trainer, Benefits Analyst, Project Coordinator, Claims Analyst, Field Representative, Human Resources Assistant, Customer Service Representative

Want to know more about the nature of the work, working conditions, earnings, training, and job outlook? Then check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook @ http://stats.bls.gov/ocohome.htm

What can you do with a major in Environmental Policy and Planning?

A degree in Environmental Policy & Planning is designed to prepare students for a variety of challenging professions involving the planning, analysis, design, and administration of policies and programs dealing with the natural and human-made environment.

The Public Policy emphasis prepares students for employment in the public, nonprofit, and private market sectors as environmental policy analysts, economic analysts, specialists in public information, government relations, and related careers, as well as for graduate work in environmental studies, public policy, public affairs, administration, and law.

The Planning emphasis helps prepare students for careers and graduate work in environmental planning, urban and regional planning, geography, land-based consulting, mapping, and related fields.

Want to know more about the nature of the work, working conditions, earnings, training, and job outlook for these occupations? Then check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook @ http://stats.bls.gov/ocohome.htm

What can you do with a major in Urban and Regional Studies?

The Urban and Regional Studies major and minor offer the skills and knowledge base for a wide range of challenging and rewarding careers in the public, private, and non-profit sectors, including architecture, community organization, economic development, housing and real estate, and urban and regional planning. The interdisciplinary major provides excellent preparation for graduate study in master's and doctoral programs in architecture, geography, political science, public administration, urban and regional planning, urban studies, and other fields. Because employment opportunities for students in Urban and Regional Studies include such a wide range of careers in the public, private, and non-profit sectors, there are a wide range of resources that you can consult to help with your job search.

The Urban and Regional Studies major and minor offer the skills and knowledge base for a wide range of challenging and rewarding careers in both the private and public sector, including:

Architecture, Community Organization, Economic Development, Education, Journalism, Marketing, Real Estate, Social Services, and Urban and Regional Planning.

The following list represents a few of the kinds of career titles for Urban & Regional Studies majors:

Community/county/city planners, Neighborhood Planner, Urban and regional planners, Architect, Land Planner, Water Resources Manager, Landscape Architects, City Managers, Civil Engineers, Environmental Engineers, Directors of Community or Economic Development, Geographers, Transportation Planner, Land Acquisition & Development, and Zoning Officer.

Employment opportunities across a wide range of careers in your local communities--including work with government agencies and community organizations as well as the private sector --may be found in the job listings of your local newspapers, including the Green Bay Press-Gazette, Appleton Post-Crescent, and Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. For a statewide and regional listing of employment opportunities, you will want to check out the job listings in the Chicago Tribune, Madison Capital Times, and Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

Students interested in careers in economic development, urban planning, and related areas in the public sector should also look at the job postings for individual towns and cities. All such job openings must be posted for public notice. You may want to start with employment listings for local communities; including Appleton, Green Bay, De Pere, and Brown County. Expand your job search to include employment listings for larger cities in the Midwest, including Chicago, Madison, Milwaukee, Minneapolis - St. Paul

Current job openings in urban and regional planning, community and economic development, and related areas in Wisconsin can be viewed at the Wisconsin Chapter of the American Planning Association website.

A national listing of current job openings in urban and regional planning, community and economic development, and related areas across the country can be viewed at the website for the American Planning Association.

Want to know more about the nature of the work, working conditions, earnings, training, and job outlook? Then check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook.