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UW-Green Bay Continuing Professional Education

First Nations Professional Certificate

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Fulfill Your Act 31 Requirement

UW-Green Bay’s First Nations Professional Certificate will increase participant’s understanding of issues related to the history, culture and tribal sovereignty of the federally recognized Native American Nations and bands in Wisconsin. This certificate provides experiential learning and accurate, authentic information in order to improve and enrich professional practice that is culturally appropriate and reflective of First Nations peoples.

These five full-day intensive sessions use teaching methods reflecting tribal oral tradition, Elder epistemology and participatory learning. In addition, they will also reflect tribal core values sometimes referred to as the “4Rs” — respect, reciprocity, relationship and responsibility. Participants will learn First Nations content but also experience it in cultural context and practice consistent with First Nations cultural norms.

This certificate program is appropriate for educators and classroom teachers, as well as social workers, licensed professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, nursing home administrators and other health and human services professionals. It satisfies the Act 31 requirements for social workers, educators and classroom teachers.

In order to satisfy the Act 31 requirements, educators and classroom teachers will need to take Session 1 (two date options) and one more of Sessions 2-5 in this program, as per Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction policy.


Session 1Session 2Session 3Session 4Session 5







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Continuing Education:

This certificate program provides options to participants. Even though it is offered as a certificate-granting program, participants can take an individual session or multiple sessions without completing the certificate. Participants who complete all five sessions will receive the UW-Green Bay First Nations Professional Certificate and 3 CEUs/30 CEHs.

Each individual session will provide .6 CEU or 6 CEHs as continuing education credit hours, continental breakfast, instruction, printed materials, lunch and continuing education certificate.


Fee: $119 per session

Take all five sessions and receive a $50 discount.


Times: 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.



Location: The Meadows at Country Inn and Suites

850 Kepler Drive, Green Bay, WI 54311
The UW-Green Bay First Nations room block expires 30 days prior to event. Call 920-288-0101 to reserve a room at the state rate of $82.


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Session 1 – Two Date Options:

Understanding First Nations

Co-Facilitated by Forrest Brooks and Lisa Poupart

Friday, June 15, 2018
Friday, June 29, 2018


This first session in the series will ground participants in the multiple facets of Indigenous identities and their relationship to original practices and belief systems. Participants will reflect on their own preconceptions in order to examine development, interaction and diversity of relationships with First Nations peoples. Participants will also explore the concept of cultural humility as it relates to working with First Nations individuals and families.

Learning Outcomes — Participants will:

  • Learn the multiple facets of Indigenous identities including their relationship to original practices and belief systems.
  • Understand how Euro-American colonization impacted the historical and contemporary status of the First Nations in Wisconsin.
  • Learn the concept of cultural humility as it relates to their work practices.
  • Critically examine their own ideologies and worldviews in contrast to First Nations worldviews and practices.

Register »Printable Registration Form »





Session 2:

Resistance, Change and Colonization

Co-Facilitated by Forrest Brooks and Lisa Poupart

Friday, October 5, 2018


This session examines the multiple factors that brought about the destruction and loss of traditional ways for First Nations due to Euro-American contact and colonization. Participants will examine the ways in which Euro-American political, economic, legal and social power facilitated the near genocide of First Nations. Throughout the session, participants will engage in discussion to dispel popular stereotypes regarding First Nations peoples and how these stereotypes impact them today. Whenever possible, the exploration of American Indians will draw upon the Wisconsin First Nations for specific examples and illustrations. These Nations include the Anishinaabeg, Menominee, Oneida, Hochunk, Mohican, Brotherton and Potawatomi. The session will conclude with an exploration of the perseverance of First Nations peoples in the United States today.

Learning Outcomes — Participants will:

  • Understand how Euro-American colonization affected the historical and contemporary status of the First Nations in Wisconsin.
  • Critically examine their own ideologies and worldviews in contrast to First Nations worldviews and practices.
  • Understand the importance of dispelling popular stereotypes regarding First Nations peoples in today’s world.

Register »Printable Registration Form »





Session 3:

Indigenous Education, Euro-American Policy and Historical Trauma

Co-Facilitated by Forrest Brooks and Lisa Poupart

Friday, November 2, 2018


This session provides an in-depth examination of specific Euro-American education policies including the U.S. Federal Indian boarding schools. Education is examined as a colonial tool of assimilation and institutional oppression. Unresolved historic grief syndrome and historical trauma will be presented as lenses for understanding and addressing social issues in First Nations communities today, including suicide, domestic violence and substance abuse.

Learning Outcomes — Participants will:

  • Understand how Euro-American colonization affected the historical and contemporary status of the First Nations in Wisconsin.
  • Learn how the Euro-American education policies affected First Nations peoples.
  • Critically examine their own ideologies and worldviews in contrast to First Nations worldviews and practices.

Register »Printable Registration Form »





Session 4:

Ethics and Boundaries: Working with First Nations Communities

Co-facilitated by Jen Schanen and Forrest Brooks

Friday, January 18, 2019


This interactive session focuses on ethics and boundaries as they apply to professionals working with First Nations communities. Participants will examine personal worldviews, as well as professional obligations and boundaries and will identify situations that are unique to professionals working with First Nations communities and/or with First Nations peoples. Participants will apply ethical decision-making models to scenario-based discussions. Through experiential learning and accurate, authentic information, participants will enrich professional practice that is culturally appropriate and reflective of First Nations peoples.

Learning Outcomes — Participants will:

  • Critically examine their own ideologies and worldviews in comparison and contrast to First Nations worldviews and practices.
  • Identify professional and cultural ethics and boundaries relevant to work in First Nations communities and with First Nations peoples.
  • Apply ethical reasoning strategies to ethical situations that occur in First Nations communities and with First Nations peoples.

Register »Printable Registration Form »





Session 5:

First Nations Generational Healing for Professionals

Co-Facilitated by Forrest Brooks and Lisa Poupart

Friday, February 15, 2019


The final session in the series focuses on the idea and practice of generational healing. A brief contextualization of historical and generational trauma will start the session and participants will be grounded to a renewal of relationships using Indigenous protocols. Discussion will cover various examples of Indigenous traditions, including how to relate to their healthy ways of being and how they relate to the world. In addition, the concept of the medicine wheel, which is used as a way of connecting and building relationships, will be reviewed in depth. Participants will be given the opportunity to discuss and apply the concepts of the practice of healing while focusing on their own ways of interacting and working with Indigenous peoples.

Learning Outcomes — Participants will:

  • Learn the concepts of historical and generational trauma of the First Nations peoples.
  • Understand the concepts around connecting, building relationships and the practice of healing based on Indigenous traditions.

Register »Printable Registration Form »





Faculty Biographies


Lisa Poupart Photo

Lisa M. Poupart, Ph.D., is a member of the Lac Du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Anishinaabeg. She is an Associate Professor of First Nations Education, Women’s and Gender Studies and Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Dr. Poupart chairs the UW-Green Bay First Nations Education Program and co-directs the Education Center for First Nations Education. She also directs the First Nations Education Doctoral Program (Ed.D.) — the first doctoral program at UW-Green Bay. Her work centers on First Nations generational healing of historic trauma. She is an international board member of Debwewin, a nonprofit First Nations organization dedicated to education about traditional healing systems to promote the wellness of all beings and the Earth. Dr. Poupart is also involved in a number of initiatives to standardize First Nations Studies curriculum in grades K-16. Her collaborative book, Connective Pedagogy: Elder Epistemology, Oral Tradition and Community, explores the traditional knowledge and teaching methodology of the Tribal World (2013, Aboriginal Issues Press/University of Manitoba.) Dr. Poupart works with First Nations oral traditional Elders and First Nations youth in higher education settings.

Jen Schanen Photo

Jen Schanen, MSW, APSW, is a Lecturer and BSW Field Coordinator with the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Professional Social Work Programs. Previously, Schanen worked at a grassroots nonprofit organization, serving primarily Native American children and families. She coordinated domestic violence, sexual assault and teen pregnancy prevention and outreach efforts — both in direct practice settings with youth and community, and in program development and evaluation capacities.

Forrest Brooks Photo

Forrest Brooks, MA, is a member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, with family lines also in the Stockbridge-Munsee and Menominee Nation communities. He serves as a Lecturer in First Nations Education within the Humanities program at UW-Green Bay. He has held this position for seven years. During the first six years of working with the program, he served as an Academic Advisor that assisted in outreach to Indigenous communities in Wisconsin such as Menominee Nation, Oneida Nation, Stockbridge-Munsee Nation and the Lac Du Flambeau community. Prior to working at the University, Brooks worked with the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin in several capacities in the creation of Oneida language teaching materials and as a teacher of Oneida language. He is part of the team that created the First Nations Education Doctoral Program (Ed.D.) — the first doctoral program at UW-Green Bay.



The UW-Green Bay Social Work Professional Program, accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the UW Oshkosh Council on Professional Counseling, the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services and UW-Green Bay, accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the Northcentral Association of Colleges and Schools approves continuing education training for UW-Green Bay and are accepted by the State of Wisconsin as continuing education credit hours.

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Contact Us

Phone: (920) 465-2642
Email: professionaled@uwgb.edu


For the biennium beginning March 1, 2017 and ending February 28, 2019, 30 continuing education credits are required. Of those 30 credits, four credit hours must be in professional ethics and boundaries related to the practice of marriage and family therapy, professional counseling or social work. See Wisconsin Statues and Administrative Code for details.


Cancellation Policy:

A full refund minus a $25 processing fee is given when canceling more than 10 days prior to an event. A $25 processing fee will be added when transferring your registration to another training more than 10 days prior to an event. No refund is issued 10 or fewer days prior to the event. A substitute may attend in your place. In case of low enrollments, we reserve the right to cancel programs and return a full refund.