University of Wisconsin - Green Bay


Research Council

Research
Success

Sara Schmitz

Sara Schmitz

Spring 2013

"The Effect of Human Patient Simulation Activities on the Clinical Competence of Dietetics Students at UW - Green Bay"

Grant in Aid of Research

Final Report: "The main objective of this project was to determine if human simulation experiences are a sustainable strategy that allow dietetics students realistic clinical practicum experiences. Using the standardized Simulation Effectiveness Tool Survey, the students reported the following after their simulation experience:
- Forty-six percent of surveyed students strongly agreed that they feel better prepared to care for real patients, while the remaining 54% somewhat agree that they feel better prepared.
- Thirty-eight percent of students strongly agreed that they felt more confident in their decision making skills, while 50% somewhat agreed with this statement.
- Sixty-five percent of students stated that their assessment skills improved as a result of the simulation, while 35% of students somewhat agreed with this statement.
- Seventy-seven percent of students stated that the simulation experience helped them to understand the classroom information better; 12% of students somewhat agreed. Only one student did not agree with this statement.
- Sixty-nine percent of students stated that they were challenged in their thinking and decision making skills. The remaining 31% of students somewhat agreed with this statement. Preliminary evaluation shows simulation to be a promising educational method to provide realistic and valuable clinical experiences to dietetics students. Further research will continue to assess the degree to which students are able to retain, utilize, and apply the knowledge learned as a result of human patient simulation."