March 2006

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Fifth annual Academic Excellence Symposium

Arts Management Student Summit

Senior art exhibit

Magdalen Hsu-Li
workshop, concert


Quality of life in Andes
presentation


Leadership Summit on Diversity

News from NEW ERA: Library card

Wisconsin Naturalists wildflower class

Space art award winners

Adult Degree information sessions

Summer courses for educators

Door County's natural heritage conference

Guitar and Bass Guitar Camp

Senior High School Music Camp

Spanish Immersion Camp

Space Experience Camp

UWGB Downtown, March 23

Visiting scholar arrives

Choral concert, March 16

Fox River Watershed Symposium

Student Research Symposium

Author Eric Alterman to speak

Jazz groups concert

Summer Discovery enrichment program

Middle School Music Camp

Jazz Ensemble Camp

UW System Women of Color Award

Grandparents' University summer camp

Facilities Management director named

Vocal Jazz, Blues and Gospel Choir Camp

High School Summer Art Studio

Middle School Summer Art Studio

Women's Day program

National teacher certification session

Academic progress
report of
student-athletes



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UW-Green Bay to highlight outstanding scholarly, creative work

GREEN BAY - University of Wisconsin-Green Bay students will put their outstanding scholarly and creative work on display for the campus community, general public and UW System Regents Thursday, April 6 at the University's fifth annual Academic Excellence Symposium.

About 130 of UW-Green Bay's best and brightest students will exhibit 62 projects at the Symposium, which runs from 10 a.m. to noon in the Winter Garden Lounge of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall.

Students participating in the Symposium will set up poster displays, computer presentations and other types of exhibits to showcase their research and creative work. Presenters will be available to discuss the projects with visitors.

Participants are from the education, humanistic studies, public and environmental affairs, business administration, communication and the arts, natural and applied sciences, human development, social change and development, human biology, information and computing science, and social work academic units.

A complete list of projects to be displayed at the Symposium is available online at http://www.uwgb.edu/lasdean/aes/.

UW-Green Bay faculty members nominated students for the Symposium. It provides the campus and community with an opportunity to learn more about the interesting work being done across campus.

The Symposium will precede meetings of the UW System Board of Regents on the UW-Green Bay campus Thursday, April 6 and Friday, April 7.

The annual Academic Excellence Symposium is sponsored by the honor societies of Phi Kappa Phi and Phi Eta Sigma and the offices of UW-Green Bay's Provost and Academic Deans.

(06-76 / 30 March 2006 / SH)

UW-Green Bay to host student conference on arts management

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will host an Arts Management Student Summit on Friday, April 7. Nearly 60 students from UW-Green Bay, UW-Whitewater, UW-Stevens Point and UW-Parkside will attend.

Keynote speaker George Tzougros, executive director of the Wisconsin Arts Board, will speak on leadership and arts in the community. Students also will participate in numerous activities including a panel discussion with working arts managers, master classes and case studies.

Guest speakers include Lisa Nalbandian, regional manager of Wisconsin Public Radio, Tiffany Wilhelm, executive director of the Central Wisconsin Children's Museum, Carey Ninfo, form group sales manager at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, and Elizabeth Meissner, assistant director of the Fairfield Center for Contemporary Art. Nalbandian, Ninfo and Meissner are graduates of UW System schools.

UW-Green Bay was selected to host the conference because it has the largest arts management program in the UW System.

"I'm excited that UW-Green Bay is hosting this important event," said Ellen Rosewall, assistant professor of arts management at UW-Green Bay. "Our students will be able to meet each other, hear from some of Wisconsin's most notable arts managers and have some fun."

UW-Green Bay student Lisa Andre said, "It will be a terrific chance to share skills learned in our arts management classes with other students and professionals throughout the state."

For more information about the Arts Management Student Summit, contact Rosewall by phone at (920) 465-2673 or by e-mail at rosewale@uwgb.edu.

(06-75 / 30 March 2006 / SH)

Senior art exhibit opens at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY-Five University of Wisconsin-Green Bay students will exhibit their work in a senior art exhibit opening with a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 2 in the Lawton Gallery on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Exhibitors and their media are Amy Davies, Green Bay, collages on canvas; Candice Kaiser, Edgar, brooches arranged in an installation; Cory Linsmeyer, Butternut, garments; Donna Mleziva, Luxemburg, color photographs; and Amy Williams, De Pere, sculptures.

The exhibit continues through April 14. It is the first of two senior shows scheduled this month at UW-Green Bay. Senior exhibits represent the culmination of art students' studies.

The Lawton Gallery is located in Theater Hall Room 230. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

(06-74 / 29 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay workshop, concert features acclaimed musician/artist

GREEN BAY-Magdalen Hsu-Li, a musician, visual artist, speaker and cultural activist, will make two appearances on Wednesday, April 5 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr. Both events are free and open to the public.

At noon, Hsu-Li will present a workshop and informal lecture on the topic of being Asian and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bi-sexual or trans-sexual) in the American music industry. She'll talk about changing social status, identity, visibility and media representations of such artists. The event will be in the American Intercultural Center in Cofrin Library Room 207.

Hsu-Li will perform in concert at 8 p.m. in the Phoenix Rooms of University Union. The concert features songs from her most recent recording, "Smashing the Ceiling," which showcases songs she wrote.

Reviewers use phrases such as "rare force" and "one-woman dynamo" to describe Hsu-Li's performance, and "achingly gorgeous" and "sumptuous feast for the ears" to describe her music. "Rockrgrl Magazine" compares Hsu-Li to Ani DeFranco and Tori Amos. Her previous release, "Fire" was named one of the top 12 do-it-yourself albums of 2002 by "Performing Songwriter" magazine.

Hsu-Li has a bachelor of fine arts in painting from Rhode Island School of Design and studied jazz and classical voice, composition and piano at Cornish College of the Arts. She has received numerous scholarships, fellowships and awards in both the visual arts and music.

Hsu-Li travels extensively to perform, lecture and give workshops. "I intend to always be defining issues of identity, raising awareness and bringing communities together through my music," she says. Her appearance at UW-Green Bay is sponsored by the Office of Student Life and the American Intercultural Center.

(06-73 / 28 March 2006 / VCD)

Quality of life in Andes is topic at
UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY- "Improving the Quality of Life in the Andes: a Case Study" will be the topic of a presentation by Julio Alegria, director of the Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Services Project (SANBASUR) in Cusco, Peru at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 4 in Phoenix Room A of University Union at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Alegria is on a month-long visit to Green Bay under the auspices of the St. Norbert College-University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Joint International Visiting Scholars Program.

SANBASUR's goal is to reduce the rate of water-related diseases by combining community ownership with sustainable water supply and sanitation practices. The Swiss-funded project involves more than 12,000 families in 240 peasant communities located in remote mountain areas. The approach and low-cost technologies being used in Cusco are being adopted for rural water supply and sanitation projects in other areas.

Alegria has had a long career in rural development in Peru. The April 4 presentation is sponsored by the International Visiting Scholars Program and a UW-Green Bay reading group presently discussing the book, "The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time," by Jeffrey Sachs.

The St. Norbert College-UW-Green Bay International Visiting Scholars Program pools the resources of the two institutions, with assistance from the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation, to bring highly qualified professionals from developing countries to Green Bay for periods ranging from several weeks to a year.

(06-72 / 28 March 2006 / VCD)

Community summit to make call to action on diversity

GREEN BAY - A community-wide leadership summit will strengthen the commitment to racial and ethnic diversity in Brown County and build on the foundation of a welcoming community for residents and businesses.

The first "Leadership Summit on Diversity: A Call to Action" will take place Thursday, April 20 in the Lambeau Field Atrium. It will run from 8:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

The summit is an opportunity for participants to discuss the many diversity initiatives in the area and outline their visions for a diverse Brown County. The gathering will serve as a springboard for collaborative action on the important issue of the changing face of Brown County's population.

The summit's keynote speaker, Dr. Samuel Betances, is an educator and consultant who has worked with U.S. presidents, business leaders, members of the clergy and teachers. He has helped others learn the importance of pulling cultures together as a way of strengthening communities.

Bruce Shepard, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, and John Jones, executive vice president and chief operating officer of the Green Bay Packers, will welcome summit participants. The event also will include a dialogue facilitated by Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce President Paul Jadin and the viewing of Do You Know Your Neighbor?, a video created in the community.

Primary sponsors of the event are the Green Bay Packers, Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce, Brown County UW-Extension and UW-Green Bay.

The registration fee for the Leadership Summit on Diversity is $25 a person or $15 for students. The fee covers all program costs, including lunch. The deadline for registering is Monday, April 17.

To register or for more information, call the UW-Green Bay Office of Outreach and Extension at (800) 892-2118 or go online at http://diversity.uwgb.edu.

(06-71 / 23 March 2006 / SH)

NEW ERA opens up public college libraries to communities

GREEN BAY-For the 1.2 million residents of Northeast Wisconsin, tracking down that hard-to-find book or resource just got easier - thanks to a new service from Northeast Wisconsin Educational Resource Alliance (NEW ERA).

NEW ERA, a consortium of 13 public universities and colleges in Northeast Wisconsin, has opened up its libraries in the region to all community members. Using the NEW ERA library card, students, staff, and residents can now check out library materials at any of the 13 NEW ERA partner institutions.

“This NEW ERA library card exemplifies that knowledge has no boundaries,” said Dr. H. Jeffrey Rafn, NEW ERA Chair and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College President. “NEW ERA is extremely pleased with the work done by our various libraries to make information freely available to all members of the communities that we serve without regard to institution.”

Dr. Bruce Shepard, Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, added, “The NEW ERA library card is an excellent example of our higher educational institutions working together for the benefit of our region's citizens. I applaud our campus librarians and their staffs for collaborating to make this happen.”

The library cards are available by request at any of the participating libraries at no cost. Cards will be issued to students, faculty, and staff of NEW ERA institutions and to community members. Each user will need to complete an application form and present valid Wisconsin identification before the NEW ERA card is issued. The card will be valid for one year and can be renewed.

This new service builds on NEW ERA Libraries' four-year history of collaboratively maintaining and enhancing library services in Northeast Wisconsin to students, faculty, staff, and residents.

“The big change here is that students, staff, and the community will now be able to go to the libraries and use their whole collections,” said Kim LaPlante, Library Services Manager at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College in Green Bay. “They can also check out books from the colleges and take them home. In the past many colleges charged non-students for these privileges.

“This is very important when someone is researching a subject and does not know a specific book title that they want to borrow through interlibrary loan,” LaPlante continued. “Now they can go to the other library, browse the stacks, and choose the books they want to check out. Browsing the stacks usually leads you to other books you would not normally have found by just searching the catalog.”

Cardholders will be granted circulation privileges according to the local policies determined at each of the participating libraries. Length of checkout period, types of circulation materials, number of items to be checked out at one time, and fine policies will vary by library. Types of services not granted by the card include interlibrary loan and remote access to licensed databases.

NEW ERA partners include:
• College of Menominee Nation
• Fox Valley Technical College
• Lake Shore Technical College
• Moraine Park Technical College
• Northeast Wisconsin Technical College
• UW-Extension
• UW-Fond du Lac
• UW-Fox Valley
• UW-Green Bay
• UW-Manitowoc
• UW-Marinette
• UW-Oshkosh
• UW-Sheboygan

NEW ERA strives to be a valued leader in collaborating to serve Northeast Wisconsin with quality, seamless education and providing essential resources for communities. For more information, go to www.neweraonline.org/libraries.

Contacts:
— Dr. H. Jeffrey Rafn - NEW ERA Chair/Northeast Wisconsin Technical College President, (920) 498-5411
— Kim LaPlante, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Library Services Manager, (920) 498-5487
— Leanne Hansen, Director, Cofrin Library, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, (920) 465-2537.
— Ann Malvitz, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Public Relations, (920) 498-5593

(06-70 / 21 March 2006)

Wisconsin Naturalists wildflower class is set at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY-Spring Wildflowers, an advanced class for individuals who have completed the first sequence of courses in the Wisconsin Naturalists program sponsored by the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, will begin on Wednesday, April 19.

Enrollment is open now for the eight-week series of classes followed by two field trips. Class meetings will be from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, April 19 and 26, and May 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31. An all-day field trip is scheduled for June 3, with a second daylong field trip scheduled around flower bloom times and students' schedules.

Kathy Groves, botanist for the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and a technician for the Cofrin Arboretum, will teach the course. Groves is completing master's degree research on the impacts of invasive earthworms on native vegetation in northern Wisconsin forests.

Classes will meet in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall Room 139 at UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr. The class is limited to 18. Slots not filled by those who've completed the first Wisconsin Naturalist course sequence will be available to Master Gardeners. Cost for the course is $85.

The Wisconsin Naturalists program is for persons who want to learn about ecology and who want to help preserve northeastern Wisconsin's native ecosystems. Participants must be 18 or older, but no previous experience or training is necessary. Courses are taught by university-level teachers.

To earn the Wisconsin Naturalists credential, participants must take the introductory course covering climate, water, soils, taxonomy, food webs, biodiversity, restoration and management, and plant communities; complete 25 hours of volunteer work; and take one specialized course.

The introductory course will be offered again in fall 2006. Registration begins Sept. 10. Yearly specialized courses will cover a variety of topics.

Information about the Spring Wildflower course or about the Wisconsin Naturalists program is available at www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/ or by calling Vicki Medland at (920) 465-2342.

(06-69 / 20 March 2006 / VCD)

Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium to unveil space art award winners

GREEN BAY - The Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium on Tuesday, March 28 will publicly unveil award-winning space-related artwork of two University of Wisconsin-Green Bay students.

The artwork will be unveiled at 1 p.m. at the Consortium's offices in Suite 301 of the Environmental Sciences building at UW-Green Bay.

The student artists who created the award-winning pieces are:

• Darci White, Green Bay, a senior who is studying art education and theater design with a minor in graphic communications. White's acrylic paint, pastel and ink piece, "Quantitative Advancements with Spirit and Opportunity," will be installed in the hallway just outside the Consortium's offices.

• Daniel Klewer, Muskego, a senior majoring in art with a minor in education. Klewer's oil on canvas painting, "A Head Full of Space is Not Empty," will be installed in the lounge area of the Consortium's headquarters.

The winning works of art were selected from 15 proposals submitted in the Consortium-sponsored space art competition. White and Klewer each received $1,000 scholarships for their winning concepts.

R. Aileen Yingst, director of the Space Grant Consortium, said the winners were selected from a number of high-quality, diverse proposals.

"The Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium's mission is to inspire the next generation of space and aerospace experts," Yingst said. "These awards will allow us to harness the power of art to inspire and fire the imagination and support the work of a very different type of student at the same time. It's a wonderful interdisciplinary opportunity."

The competition was open to all UW-Green Bay art and communication and the arts majors and minors. UW-Green Bay art faculty collaborated with the Consortium's staff in the selection process.

The Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, based at UW-Green Bay, fosters the recruitment and support of students in science, mathematics and technology by funding research, student scholarships and outreach projects in a wide variety of fields related to aerospace.

(06-68 / 20 March 2006 / SH)

UW-Green Bay Adult Degree information sessions to be held this week

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is holding free informational sessions this week for working adults interested in learning about UW-Green Bay's Adult Degree Programs.

The sessions are scheduled for Thursday, March 23 at 6 p.m. and Saturday, March 25 at 9:30 a.m. The sessions are in Room 217 of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The innovative and convenient Adult Degree Programs make a bachelor of arts degree accessible to nontraditional adult students who have heavy work and family responsibilities.

The information sessions cover a wide range of topics such as starting and returning to college as an adult student, support services of adult students, program costs and financial aid, credit for life learning and how to get started.

Students attending Adult Degree Programs attend half-day Saturday classes and work independently between classes. Students benefit from small class sizes and personalized attention.

For prospective students who cannot make the March informational sessions, additional sessions will be held in April. The April sessions are Thursday, April 20 at 6 p.m. and Saturday, April 22 at 9:30 a.m. Those sessions also are in Room 217 of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall.

For more information or to register for UW-Green Bay Adult Degree Programs information sessions, go online at www.uwgb.edu/adultdegrees or call (920) 465-2423 or (800) 621-2313.

(06-67 / 20 March 2006 / SH)

UW-Green Bay plans more than 40 summer courses for educators

GREEN BAY-The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering more than 40 different courses for educators in northeastern Wisconsin over the course of the summer, including four courses being offered for the first time.

Asperger Syndrome: Strategies for Solving the Social Puzzle, Using the Outdoors to Enhance Your Curriculum, Reading and Writing Across the Content Areas, and Teaching Plant Diversity are new to the array of courses organized through UW-Green Bay's Outreach and Adult Access division.

Also new are more enrollment choices, according to Carmen Leuthner, UW-Green Bay director of education outreach. Leuthner says more courses this summer will include noncredit options through which educators can earn a certificate of completion instead of graduate or undergraduate credit.

Enrollment in most classes is limited, so registration at least two weeks before the start of a course is recommended. Numbers for detailed information and to request registration materials are (920) 465-2480 or (800) 892-2118. Information and registration also are available online at www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach. New offerings added throughout the year may be found on the website.

UW-Green Bay courses for educators align with Wisconsin standards for teacher and administrator development and licensure.

(06-66 / 20 March 2006 / VCD)

Conference focuses on Door County's natural heritage

GREEN BAY-Government officials, land managers, educators and citizens are invited to a two-day conference on the topic of Door County's Natural Heritage Tuesday and Wednesday, April 18 and 19 at Björklunden Lodge, Bailey's Harbor. Registration is open now.

Conference organizers aim to unite policy-makers, teachers, scientists and citizens to increase awareness of Door County's unique natural features and biodiversity, identify threats and opportunities for conserving the county's natural heritage, and mobilize strategies for conservation.

Curt Meine, a writer and conservation biologist, will speak on "Door County-A Sense of Place" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 18. Meine is the author of books including "Aldo Leopold: His Life and Work," and "Correction Lines: Essays on Land, Leopold and Conservation." He has served on the board of governors of the Society for Conservation Biology and editorial boards for the journals "Conservation Biology" and "Environmental Ethics."

The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 18. Daytime sessions include presentations by scientists and other experts on Door County's geology, climate, plants, animals, and natural communities, followed by presentations on threats and conservation, and protection, stewardship and restoration.

Wednesday, April 19 sessions will address conservation and stewardship priorities, strategies and implementation, and coordinating those efforts. Conference attendees will be able to participate in group discussions.

Conference sponsors include the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, The Ridges Sanctuary, The Nature Conservancy, University of Wisconsin-Extension and the Friends of Toft Point.

The five groups note that Door County has more than 250 miles of Great Lakes shoreline, more state natural areas and state parks-24 and five-than any other Wisconsin county, 162 breeding bird species-second to only one other county-and 163 species listed as endangered, threatened or of special concern at state or federal levels. All of these resources are impacted by invasive species, overbrowsing by deer, a rapidly growing human population and intense use by visitors.

Conference registration is $10 and meals (two lunches and one dinner) cost $10 each.

Registration information is available at www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity or by e-mail to mckeefrk@uwgb.edu or telephone to (920) 465-5032. Information about lodging at Björklunden Lodge is available from mark.d.bresemanm@lawrence.edu or by phone to (920) 839-2216.

(06-65 / 16 March 2006 / VCD)

Guitar students can explore styles at
UW-Green Bay camp

GREEN BAY-Students entering grades 8 through 12 can explore styles including jazz, classical, pop/rock, blues/R&B, and accompaniment at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Guitar and Bass Guitar Camp July 30 through August 4 on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Students will study with lead teachers and guest artists who are professional musicians. Corporate sponsors will bring professional clinicians to campus for performances throughout the week.

Camp director is Bob Balsley who teaches recording and guitar at UW-Green Bay. He has performed and recorded with a variety of artists from Chuck Berry to the Green Bay Symphony Orchestra. Balsley is the author of "Understanding Guitar Chords," and "Understanding Chord Progressions," and writes for "Guitar Player" magazine.

Students can attend the camp as commuters or as residents living in University student housing.

Residents will check in on Sunday, July 31 and have dinner and evening activities on campus. The camp gets underway for all campers with auditions and an all-camp meeting on Monday morning. Daily sessions are from 8:30 a.m. to 3:20 p.m. Students will end the camp by performing in a final public concert at 6:30 p.m. on Friday.

Prospective students should note that they must bring all needed playing equipment to camp, including basses and electric guitars with amps.

The camp fee is $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, the resident fee includes room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-64 / 14 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay offers music camp for senior high students

GREEN BAY-Registration is open now for Senior High School Band, Orchestra and Choral Camp scheduled from July 23 through 29 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr. The camp is open to students entering grades 9 through 12 in the fall.

The camp offers intensive musical instruction appropriate to students' skill levels with emphasis on developing individual abilities. In addition to rehearsals, sectionals, and classes, students will be able to select a special interest course from an array including composition, aural skills and improvisation for the last hour of each day. Monday through Friday classes will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 3:40 p.m.

The camp week begins with auditions and an all-camp meeting on Sunday, July 23 and ends with a final concert at 9 a.m. July 29 in the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2007 camp.

UW-Green Bay Director of Bands Kevin Collins leads the camp. Collins directs the UW-Green Bay Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band and teaches conducting and low brass instruments. He founded the UW-Green Bay State-Bound Honor Band for high school students who have received outstanding ratings for solo performances at district music festivals.

The camp orchestra will be directed by Janis Shier Peterson, director of orchestras for the Marquette (Mich.) Area Public Schools. Orchestras under her direction have performed at the EPCOT Center and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Camp teachers will include faculty members from UW-Green Bay and other colleges and universities and outstanding teachers from middle and high schools.

Students can attend as commuters or as residents living in University student housing. The camp fee is $225 for commuters. Resident students will pay $469 that includes-in addition to instruction-room and board, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-63 / 14 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay Spanish Immersion Camp is for grades 7-12

GREEN BAY-Students who want to learn or perfect their knowledge of Spanish and the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world can do so at the Spanish Immersion and Culture Camp from July 30 through August 4 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Registration is open now for students in grades 7 through 12.

The intensive program can help students with beginning, intermediate or advanced knowledge of the language. Students will be assigned to skill groups based on results of a test taken prior to camp.

In addition to language skills, students will experience authentic food, sports, crafts and games of various Spanish-speaking countries.

Camp staff members are native speakers from different countries. The camp director is Rosa Nelson, a former Spanish instructor at UW-Green Bay now with the Gibraltar School District. She is fluent in English, Spanish and Italian.

Students can attend Spanish Immersion Camp as commuters or as residents who live in UW-Green Bay student housing.

Residents will check in on Sunday, July 30. The camp week begins for all on Monday morning, July 31. Daily Monday through Friday sessions will be from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The camp fee is $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, the resident fee includes room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation for evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-62 / 14 March 2006 / VCD)

Hands-on space science awaits campers at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY-Students entering grades 7 through 12 can conduct space science experiments, participate in space flight simulations, visit a planetarium, meet an astronaut, and have many other space-related experiences at the Space Experience Summer Camp July 30 through August 4 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Among their experiences, campers will design and program a planetary rover that can rescue a stranded astronaut, sample volcanoes, deploy experiments and perform other tasks.

Retired NASA astronaut John Bennett Herrington will be a presenter at the camp. Herrington flew on an Endeavor mission to bring a crew home from the International Space Station in 2002.

The camp director is Jason Marcks, a former high school earth and space science teacher. He has a master's degree in geoscience and presently is working toward a master's degree aeronautical science. He is the professional development director and lead instructor for the Wisconsin Initiative for Math, Science and Technology Education.

Students can attend as commuters or as residents living in UW-Green Bay student housing. Residents will register on Sunday, July 30. The camp week begins for all students on Monday morning, July 31. Sessions meet from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Family and friends are invited to the closing camp session on Friday afternoon.

The camp fee is $185 for commuters and $449 for residents. In addition to instruction, the resident fee includes room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-61 / 14 March 2006 / VCD)

Science and gender to be topic of next "UWGB Downtown"

GREEN BAY - University of Wisconsin-Green Bay faculty member Heidi Fencl will discuss why women are succeeding but under-represented in science classrooms Thursday, March 23 at the next "UWGB Downtown: Connecting for Lunch."

The learning luncheon at the Holiday Inn City Centre starts with a buffet lunch at 11:45 a.m. Fencl, associate professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, will begin her talk at 12:15 p.m. and conclude by 1:10 p.m.

Despite Harvard University President Lawrence Summer's comments, women are studying and succeeding in science although they remain under-represented in some disciplines. Studies have found that it is not ability that accounts for the difference in participation but that self-efficacy — a person's belief that he or she can succeed at a given task — is one of the strongest attributes for predicting success in a field of study.

Fencl will focus on the interaction between teaching approaches, classroom climate and development of self-efficacy.

Fencl's research interests include science self-efficacy, gender and science, and use of physical models to build abstract reasoning.

A $15 registration fee for "UWGB Downtown: Connecting for Lunch" covers lunch, presentation and materials. Registration in advance is required.

To learn more about the learning luncheon or to register, call (920) 465-2642 or go online at www.uwgb.edu/downtown/lunch.

The "UWGB Downtown: Connecting for Lunch" luncheon series is sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor at UW-Green Bay, the UW-Green Bay Alumni Association and Downtown Green Bay Inc. in collaboration with UW-Green Bay Outreach and Extension.

(06-60 / 14 March 2006 / SH)

Visiting Scholar Program hosts Peruvian water resources developer

GREEN BAY-Julio Alegria, director of the Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Services Project (SANBASUR) serving rural communities in the Andean mountain region of Peru arrived in Green Bay Thursday, March 9 for a month's stay.

His visit is sponsored by the St. Norbert College-University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Joint International Visiting Scholars Program that brings scholars and professionals from developing countries to Green Bay for periods ranging from several weeks to a year.

In Green Bay, Alegria will visit classes on both campuses, give a public lecture, tour the Green Bay watershed and the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District, and visit schools and other public venues.

The project Alegria directs in Peru aims to reduce rates of water-related diseases in poor rural communities in the mountainous region of Cusco. The Swiss Development Corporation-funded project provides sustainable water supply and sanitation services to more than 12,000 families in 240 peasant communities. Key to the success of the program is a new design for a water-flush latrine that replaces the traditional "outhouse."

The approach and low-cost technologies being used in Cusco are being adopted for rural water supply and sanitation projects in other areas. The SANBASUR project is expected to contribute to the design and launch of a National Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Program funded by the World Bank and other international donors.

Alegria has had a long career in rural development. He earned a degree in agricultural engineering at the National Agrarian University in Lima, Peru, and a master's degree in water resources planning at Colorado State University.

Prior to joining SANBASUR, he was with the Social Development Fund of Peru, ending his service there as executive director. He has served as director or in other managerial positions with an irrigation project, a water management district, a regional government, and various development projects, and has taught at university level.

The St. Norbert College-UW-Green Bay International Visiting Scholars Program pools the resources of the two institutions, with assistance from the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation, to bring highly qualified professionals from developing countries to Green Bay for the benefit of all parties.

(06-59 / 10 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay choral concert will span eras from Mozart to 21st century

GREEN BAY-The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Concert Choir and Phoenix Chorale will perform in concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 16 in the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr. Each group will present a varied program ranging from the era of Mozart to living composers to traditional airs.

Faculty member John Plier conducts the Concert Choir, and Floyd Slotterback is guest conductor of the Phoenix Chorale. Slotterback is a member of the music faculty and directs choral groups at Northern Michigan University, Marquette. He is serving as a guest director at UW-Green Bay for the present semester.

Concert Choir opens the program with "Four Robert Burns Ballads," by Franz Schubert and follows that with "Adonai Ro'i," by contemporary composer Judith Shatin. Shatin, who is director of the Virginia Center for Computer Music at the University of Virginia, has received many commissions and awards for her compositions. The Concert Choir program also includes an arrangement of the traditional air, "Black is the Color of My True Love's Hair," and Mozart's "Gloria in Excelsis."

Janet Osterberg is piano accompanist for the Concert Choir.

The Phoenix Chorale will present "Musick's Empire," by Lloyd Pfautsch, 20th century choral conductor, teacher and composer.

Soprano Emily Paulsen, alto Sarah Klauck, tenor Ian Toohill and bass Christian Ott will be featured in the Phoenix Chorale's performance of Mozart's Regina coeli K. 276. Their program includes "Arma Lucis," by contemporary composer Jackson Berkey, featuring soprano soloist Shannon Kelly. They'll end with an arrangement of the traditional spiritual, "Ezekiel Saw de Wheel," with tenor Jacob Kaltenberg as soloist.

Faculty member Benjamin Moritz accompanies the Phoenix Chorale on piano.

Tickets are $8.50 for adults and $5.50 for students and seniors. The numbers for tickets are (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587.

(06-58 / 10 March 2006 / VCD)

Symposium at UW-Green Bay to highlight Fox River Watershed research

GREEN BAY - Students from area high schools will display their research alongside research of university and agency scientists at the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program's third annual Watershed Symposium.

The symposium will be held Wednesday, March 15 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. It starts with registration at 8 a.m. and runs until 2:30 p.m. in the Niagara Rooms of UW-Green Bay's University Union.

This year's symposium will feature:

• presentations by high school students on watershed research and monitoring projects.

• poster displays by student watershed research teams and project staff.

• updates on university and agency research projects.

Participants in the symposium also will have an opportunity to attend presentations by UW-Green Bay students who received Cofrin Student Research Grants for research on the Cofrin Arboretum and UW-Green Bay natural areas.

With funding provided by Arjo Wiggins Appleton, the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program is a multi-year monitoring and assessment program in and around the Fox River Watershed.

Its main goal is to establish a long-term monitoring program that will provide high quality data to be used in making resource management decisions and predicting impacts on the ecosystem. It also is designed to enhance student, teacher and community understanding and stewardship of the Fox River Watershed.

The program involves students and researchers from UW-Green Bay's Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit and Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, UW-Milwaukee, the U.S. Geological Survey, Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District and Oneida Nation.

High school students and teachers participating in the symposium are from Green Bay Southwest, Green Bay Preble, Appleton East, Luxemburg-Casco, Markesan and West De Pere.

For more information about the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program, visit the program's Web site at www.uwgb.edu/watershed.

(06-57 / 8 March 2006 / SH)

UW-Green Bay students will report on scientific research

GREEN BAY-Seven students who won grants to carry out scientific field research will report on their projects at the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity Student Research Symposium at 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 15 in the 1965 Room of University Union on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr. The session is free and open to the public.

Students submit competitive proposals to win the research grants of up to $1,000 provided by an endowment from the family of David Cofrin and the late John Cofrin. Recipients carry out their research in the Cofrin Arboretum on campus or in one of the University's off-campus natural areas.

The student presenters, their projects and their advising professors are:

1 p.m., Craig Destree, Two Rivers, "Bee Diversity and Plant Associations at the Toft Point State Natural Area" (Prof. Amy Wolf).

1:25 p.m., Jay Watson, Porterfield, "Bee and Plant Interactions at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Cofrin Arboretum and Marinette County's Dunbar Barrens State Natural Area" (Prof. Amy Wolf).

1:50 p.m., Carolina Bacelis, Green Bay, "Survey of Spiders and Harvestmen (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones) of the Point au Sauble Nature Preserve" (Prof. Michael Draney).

2:15 p.m., Nicholas Walton, Fort Atkinson, "A Survey of Dragonflies at the Toft Point Natural Area in Door County, Wisconsin" (Prof. Amy Wolf).

2:40 p.m., Michelle Eis, Two Rivers, "Patterns of Use and Appreciation of the Arboretum Trail" (Prof. Denise Scheberle).

3:05 p.m., Amy Wortman, Green Bay, "Status and Habitat Use of Tree Squirrels in the UW-Green Bay Cofrin Arboretum" (Prof. Bob Howe).

3:30 p.m., Greg Brahe, Appleton, "Vertebral Anomalies in Eastern American Toads of the Cofrin Arboretum" (Prof. Dan Meinhardt).

All of the students were undergraduates at the time they carried out the research. Bacelis and Walton also won grants and presented reports at the 2005 symposium.

(06-56 / 8 March 2006 / VCD)

Author will speak on liberalism
at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY-"How Did Liberalism Become a Four-Letter Word?" will be the topic for author Eric Alterman when he speaks at 10 a.m. Wednesday, March 15 in the Christie Theater located in the University Union at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Alterman is the author of the best selling 2003 book, "What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News." "National Catholic Reporter" has described Alterman as "the most honest and incisive media critic writing today."

Alterman also had a bestseller with "The Book on Bush: How George W. Bush (Mis)Leads America" (2004). His most recent book is "When Presidents Lie: A History of Official Deception and Its Consequences," a historical examination of four specific post-World War II presidential lies.

Alterman is a professor of English at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, media columnist for "The Nation," the "Altercation" weblogger for MSNBC.com, and a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress where he writes and edits the "Think Again" column.

Alterman's book, "Sound and Fury: The Making of the Punditocracy," won the 1992 George Orwell Award, and "It Ain't No Sin to be Glad You're Alive: The Promise of Bruce Springsteen" won the 1999 Stephen Crane Award. Alterman lectures frequently, contributes to many national publications, and has been a columnist for "Worth," "Rolling Stone," "Mother Jones," and "The [London] Sunday Express."

(06-55 / 8 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay jazz groups concert is March 14

GREEN BAY-The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Jazz Ensemble I and Vocal Jazz Ensemble will perform in concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 14 in University Theater located in Theater Hall on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr.

John Salerno directs the Jazz Ensemble I, and Chris Salerno directs the Vocal Jazz Ensemble.

In addition to the two established groups, six students-along with John Salerno-will perform as a combo. Calling themselves the One p.m. Combo, the group includes Tracy Pachan, bass; Nick Boreen, saxophone; Elizabeth Brady, flute; Joe Bruette, trombone; Zach Grusznski, guitar; Adam Snippen, drums; and Salerno, piano. They'll present Wayne Shorter's "Footprints" and Chick Corea's "Sea Journey."

Faculty members joining in with Jazz Ensemble I will be featured on several numbers. Terence O'Grady on vibes and Stefan Hall on guitar will be soloists on Thelonius Monk's "Straight No Chaser," and again, along with student Ben Brecke on saxophone, on Bob Washut's "Rhythmism."

Students Pachan and Snippen and faculty members O'Grady and Hall will be joined by Chris Salerno on piano and John Salerno on flute in solo stints on Gerry Mulligan's "Five Brothers."

Vocal soloists with Jazz Ensemble I include Melissa Staley on "I Remember You" and Jessica Plansky on "Easy to Love."

Vocal Jazz Ensemble will join with the instrumental ensemble on a John Salerno arrangement of The Yellowjackets' "Revelation." Plansky will be the soloist.

Vocal Jazz Ensemble's program will include Chris Salerno's arrangement of "Sister Sadie," with soloists Brittany Harper, Bret Lewis and Lorna Blazek. Student Becky Ostermann is the arranger for "We've Only Just Begun." Tenor Matt Fayfer will solo on Lennon and McCartney's "Ticket to Ride."

Pachan and Snippen form the rhythm section accompaniment for Vocal Jazz Ensemble.

Tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for students and seniors. The numbers for tickets are (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587.

(06-54 / 8 March 2006 / VCD)

Much is new for youngsters at
UW-Green Bay Summer Discovery

GREEN BAY-The 13-year-old University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Summer Discovery enrichment program for elementary and middle school students continues to offer enrichment classes but a lot more is in store for summer 2006 says Discovery director Mona Christensen.

New is a remedial program for students who want to gain academic ground-or avoid falling behind-over the summer. New too, is a week of "gifted and talented" accelerated classes for students entering grades 6 through 8.

And also new to the program traditionally held at UW-Green Bay is the addition of a downtown location. Fort Howard Elementary School will be site for the remedial and the gifted and talented programs and for two weeks of the enrichment classes. Another two weeks of enrichment classes will be held at UW-Green Bay.

Christensen emphasizes that the concept of all of the classes whether remedial, accelerated, or enrichment, continues to be learning by doing-making art, playing soccer, collecting insects, caring for pets, knitting, setting off rockets and many others. "The beauty of Summer Discovery is that the kids are not in their chairs," says Christensen. "The whole program is hands-on learning."

Here are program details:

"Extra help" or remedial program
Mornings, Monday through Friday, July 17 through August 11
Fort Howard Elementary School
Grades 1 through 6
Class choices include problem solving, a computer-based program to improve reading skills, and others. One-on-one work with a tutor is among the choices. Each child will take two classes per morning. The cost for the month of morning classes is $300. In addition, children in the remedial program can make a full day of it by choosing an enrichment class in the afternoon. Enrichment classes the weeks of July 17 through 21 and July 24 through 28 are at Fort Howard School. Children who sign up for enrichment classes the weeks of July 31 through August 4 and August 7 through 11 on the UW-Green Bay campus will be provided bus transportation between Fort Howard School and the University campus.

Middle school gifted and talented program
All day, Monday through Friday, July 17 through 21 or July 24 through 28
Fort Howard Elementary School
Grades 6 through 8
Students can choose to attend for one week or both weeks. They'll take two classes per week, so a student who signs up for both weeks will be able to experience four different classes. Chinese language and culture, acting, rocketry, law and order and chess are among the accelerated class choices. The cost is $150 per week.

Enrichment classes/Fort Howard School
Afternoons only, Monday through Friday, July 17 through 21 or July 24 through 28
Fort Howard Elementary School
Grades 1 through 6
Fourteen different afternoon-long class choices are offered each week. Designing buildings, cooking, solving "crimes," and beading are among them. Children can sign up for one week or for both. The cost is $75 per week.

Enrichment classes/UW-Green Bay
Mornings or afternoons, Monday through Friday, July 31 through August 4 or August 7 through 11
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
Grades 1 through 6
Children can sign up for morning-only or afternoon-only classes or enroll two half-day classes and attend all day. Those who want to sign up for morning and afternoon for both weeks can experience four different classes. A wide selection of grade-appropriate classes includes activities such as photography, cookie baking, making motorized vehicles, producing a musical, learning about bats and many others. The cost is $75 for one class per week, or $150 per week for a student who takes both morning and afternoon classes.

In addition to the listed costs, some classes may have materials fees.

Summer Discovery teachers are highly qualified educators and professionals chosen for their ability to work creatively with children. Discovery students in all sessions will end their classes with a special presentation for family and friends on Friday afternoon.

Christensen says class sizes are limited, so early enrollment is encouraged. Descriptions of class choices are on-line at www.uwgbsummercamps.com or in a catalog that can be requested by calling (920) 465-2267.

(06-53 / 7 March 2006 / VCD)

Registration open for UW-Green Bay Middle School Music Camp

GREEN BAY-Students entering grades 6 through 9 in fall can enroll now for the Middle School Band, Orchestra and Choral Camp July 16 through 22 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Several camp options are tailored to middle school students. Students entering grades 6 and 7 will participate in "X Band," where they'll be placed by grade level rather than audition. They'll be taught by a team of teachers who specialize in working with young musicians.

All students can attend as commuters or as residents living in University student housing. Green Bay area commuters can choose the Monday through Friday bus option that will have scheduled pick-ups and drop-offs at Edison, De Pere, Franklin and Lineville Middle Schools.

Camp teachers will include faculty members from UW-Green Bay and other colleges and universities and outstanding teachers from middle and high schools.

UW-Green Bay faculty member and director of bands Kevin Collins is the camp director. He directs the UW-Green Bay Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band and teaches conducting and low brass instruments. He is the founder of the UW-Green Bay State-Bound Honor Band for high school students who have received outstanding ratings for solo performances at district music festivals.

X Band conductor is Scott Wright, faculty member in clarinet at the University of Kentucky and formerly a member of the faculty at UW-Green Bay. He presently performs with the renowned New Sousa Band, and is a popular summer festival and camp teacher.

The camp week gets underway on Sunday, July 16 with auditions for orchestra and choral students and for band students entering grades 8 and 9. The camp ends with a 9 a.m. concert on Saturday, July 22 in the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2007 camp.

The camp fee is $189 for commuters who provide their own transportation and $215 for commuters who choose the bus option. Resident students will pay $449 which includes-in addition to instruction-room and board, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-52 / 7 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay camp is for school
jazz musicians

GREEN BAY-Students entering grades 8 through 12 in the fall can develop their skills at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Jazz Ensemble Camp July 9 through 14 on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Campers can gain in-depth experience including jazz ensemble performance, master classes, jazz theory, improvisation and arranging. The camp faculty is made up of first-rate jazz teachers and performers.

Camp director and UW-Green Bay director of jazz studies John Salerno teaches saxophone, composition and other jazz-related classes at the University, and directs the UW-Green Bay Jazz Ensemble. He is a published composer and arranger. Camp faculty members will assemble from around the country.

The week begins on Sunday, July 9 with auditions and an all-camp meeting, and ends with a free public concert at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 14 in University Theater. Camp highlights include a concert by the members of the faculty. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2007 camp.

Daily classes meet from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. followed by an hour-long rehearsal period for the combos that form on the first day of camp.

Students may attend Jazz Ensemble Camp as commuters or they may live in student housing on the UW-Green Bay campus. Residents will have supervised evening activities. Camp fees are $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, the residential fee includes room and board, counselor supervision, and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-51 / 7 March 2006 / VCD)

Jeffreys wins UW System Women of
Color Award

GREEN BAY - Green Bay community activist Celestine Jeffreys received a University of Wisconsin System Women of Color Award on Saturday, March 4 in ceremonies at UW-Eau Claire. She was among 16 women across the state to receive one of the awards.

Jeffreys was the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay nominee for the award open to faculty, staff and community members who exemplify the values of the UW System's plan for educational quality through racial and ethnic diversity.

Jeffreys has a long list of community involvements since moving to Green Bay in 2000. She is a member of the Mayor's Neighborhood Leadership Council and a board member of Neighborhood Housing Services. She participates in the Multicultural Center of Greater Green Bay and the Nia African/American Dance and Drumming Group. And she's an active volunteer at Aldo Leopold School. Jeffreys served as chairperson of the Fort Howard Neighborhood Association and Resource Center for three years, and is a former coordinator of the annual Children's Rainbow Festival.

In the Feb. 21 primary elections, Jeffreys was the top vote getter in a six-way race for an open Green Bay City Council seat in the seventh district and she advances to the April 4 general election.

(06-50 / 7 March 2006 / VCD)

Grandparents, grandchildren can 'major,' 'graduate' at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY-Grandparents and their grandchildren between the ages of seven and 14 can enroll in a new two-day Grandparents' University at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay that will allow grandparents and children together to explore a topic of interest in depth and enjoy summer activities on the scenic bay shore University campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Registration is open now for the July 13 and 14 event. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Participants will choose one course from among five different "majors."

In the humanities area, UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus Michael Murphy will teach "An Introduction to Irish History and Culture." Special guests will help students discover music, dance, literature and other aspects of Irish culture. Murphy retired in 2001 after 36 years at UW-Green Bay where he taught English and humanities courses and served in various administrative positions.

Two different hands-on courses, both taught by members of the UW-Green Bay art faculty, are offered in art. Alison Gates will lead students in the Fiber Arts class through the processes of dying wool, making it into felt, and working the felt into objects. In Jennifer Mokren's Enamel Art class, participants will learn the technique of enameling a copper object.

In the sciences, UW-Green Bay faculty member Donna Ritch will lead a class in Forensic Science. Students will solve a mystery, using some of the techniques of crime scene investigation. Ritch is a member of the Human Biology and Biology faculties.

Students interested in animals and birds might choose the Biodiversity course taught by Thomas Erdman, curator of the Richter Museum of Natural History at the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity at UW-Green Bay. Participants can learn about Green Bay's natural biodiversity in the outdoor "laboratory" provided by the Cofrin Arboretum on the campus, and in the unique collections of the Richter Museum.

Grandparents' University starts with registration from 8:30 to 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 13 and ends with a graduation ceremony beginning at 1:45 p.m. on Friday, July 14.

The fee for Grandparents' University is $110 per adult and $69 per child. The fee includes instruction, activities, a cookout on Thursday night, parking and a tee shirt.

Grandparents University attendees may commute or choose to stay in UW-Green Bay student suite apartments. The cost for on-campus lodging is a flat rate of $60 for a four-bedroom suite. Commuters and residents alike may purchase a meals package for $19 per person that includes Thursday and Friday lunches and Friday breakfast. Individual meal tickets may be purchased at check-in. A "day student" lounge will be available for commuters.

Information and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-49 / 3 March 2006 / VCD)

Hatfield is new facilities management director at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - Christopher Hatfield, a maintenance manager for Thilmany Papers and a former officer in the U.S. Navy, has been named director of facilities management and planning at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Hatfield succeeds Les Raduenz, who is retiring after 35 years with the University.

The director is responsible for the management and direction of UW-Green Bay's facilities management and planning area, including building maintenance, grounds, custodial services, central heating plant, and fleet/motor pool. The director also coordinates the campus physical development planning and provides oversight on campus construction and remodeling projects.

Hatfield has been maintenance manager for pulp, utilities and facilities at Thilmany's Kaukauna Mill since 2004. Leading a department of 75 employees, he has been responsible for improving equipment reliability and reducing manufacturing costs.

He previously held numerous positions at Thilmany's De Pere Mill, including maintenance, engineering and facilities manager and converting and distribution manager.

Hatfield served in the U.S. Navy from 1983 to 1992 as a surface line officer and nuclear engineer. He received two Navy Commendation Medals and a Navy Achievement Medal.

He has a bachelor's degree in government from the University of Notre Dame. He also attended Naval Nuclear Engineering Schools and the MBA program at Miami University.

(06-48 / 3 March 2006 / SH)

Singers can explore jazz, blues and gospel at UW-Green Bay camp

GREEN BAY-Students entering grades 8 through 12 can sign up for Vocal Jazz, Blues and Gospel Choir Camp scheduled from June 25 through 30 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Campers will spend their time immersed in ensemble rehearsals, sectionals, solo vocal coaching, theory and improvisation, and studio recording. Clinics and private lessons will be given throughout the week.

Camp director is Christine Salerno, director of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Vocal Jazz Ensemble, which won an Outstanding Vocal Jazz Ensemble Award in 2004 at the Elmhurst College Jazz Festival. She also directs the Lawrence University Jazz Singers who won the "Downbeat" 2002 Outstanding Vocal Jazz Ensemble Award. Salerno has been a jazz educator for 20 years. She composes for her contemporary jazz and world music group, Ziji, and has several published vocal arrangements.

Returning guest director for the Gospel Choir is Kenneth L. Daniel Sr., Milwaukee. Daniel has been singing gospel music since he was a child. He is an educator and a performer who has appeared throughout the U.S. and Europe.

The camp begins with auditions and an all-camp meeting on Sunday, June 25. Classes meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. each day. Students who live on campus will have supervised evening activities.

The week will end with a free public concert at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, June 30 in Theater Hall at UW-Green Bay. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2007 camp.

Students may attend the camp as commuters or they may live in student housing on the UW-Green Bay campus. Camp fees are $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, the residential fee includes room and board, counselor supervision, and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information is available by telephone to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-47 / 2 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay Summer Art Studio is for high school artists

GREEN BAY-An "art car" group project, computer animation, and screen printed guerilla art are just three of the classes available to students in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay High School Summer Art Studio June 25 through 30 on the University campus at 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Registration is open now for the program for students entering grades 8 through12 in the fall.

Courses offered include media such as photography, ceramics, jewelry, painting and others. Students enroll for one subject and spend the week exploring that topic in depth. Students will interact with other classes through informal gatherings, critiques, lectures and impromptu exhibitions.

The camp week begins with check-in on Sunday, and ends with an exhibition of student work at 6 p.m. on Friday. Faculty members will choose winners of scholarships to the 2007 Summer Art Studio.

Summer Art Studio classes are taught by experienced educators and artists. Pete Angilello of the Green Bay Public Schools, and Sandra Shackelford, a documentary artist with a long record of exhibitions across the U.S., are the co-directors. UW-Green Bay Summer Art Studio is in its 49th year.

Students may attend Summer Studio as commuters or they may live in student housing on the UW-Green Bay campus. All participants will attend daily classes from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Supervised evening activities will be scheduled for residents.

Summer Camps Director Mona Christensen encourages students to seek scholarships to Summer Studio, noting that more than half of Summer Studio participants receive full or partial scholarships from parent groups, clubs and other organizations. Also, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction offers some scholarships to students with financial need, and the Wisconsin State Fair offers ten Summer Studio scholarships to participants in its Young People's Art Exhibit.

Summer Studio fees are $195 for commuters and $440 for residents. In addition to instruction, resident fees cover room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities. Some courses have additional lab fees to cover the cost of materials.

Complete information and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Telephone inquiries may be made to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-46 / 2 March 2006 / VCD)

Middle schoolers can register for
UW-Green Bay Art Studio

GREEN BAY-Registration is open for the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Middle School Summer Art Studio scheduled June 18 through 23 on the University campus, 2420 Nicolet Dr. Students entering grades 6 through 9 are eligible to attend.

Now in its 49th year, Summer Art Studio at UW-Green Bay offers students nearly a dozen classes to choose from. Ceramics, portrait sculpture and life casting, digital design, photography, cartooning, drawing, wildlife illustration, watercolor, multi-media and puppet making are among the choices. Each student will enroll in two classes, spending a half-day in each.

Experienced educators and artists teach Summer Art Studio classes. Pete Angilello of the Green Bay Public Schools, and Sandra Shackelford, a documentary artist with a long record of exhibitions across the U.S., are the co-directors.

Students may attend Summer Studio as commuters or they may live in student housing on the UW-Green Bay campus. All participants will check in on Sunday of the camp week and attend daily classes from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Supervised evening activities will be scheduled for residents. The camp week ends with an exhibition of student work from 6-6:45 p.m. on Friday, June 23 in the Studio Arts Building at UW-Green Bay. Faculty members will choose winners of scholarships to the 2007 Summer Studio.

Summer Camps Director Mona Christensen encourages students to seek scholarships to Summer Studio, noting that more than half of Summer Studio participants receive full or partial scholarships from parent groups, clubs and other organizations. Also, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction offers some scholarships to students with financial need, and the Wisconsin State Fair offers ten Summer Studio scholarships to participants in its Young People's Art Exhibit.

Summer Studio fees are $195 for commuters and $440 for residents. In addition to instruction, resident fees cover room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities. Some classes have additional laboratory fees for supplies.

Complete information and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Telephone inquiries may be made to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(06-45 / 2 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay Women's Day program features international speakers

GREEN BAY-Four women who are natives of countries other than the U.S. will comprise a panel for an International Women's Day program at 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 8 in the Christie Theater located in the University Union at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr. The program is free and open to the public.

Speakers will be Hye-Kyung Kim, Korea; Juliet Cole, Nigeria; Katie Robinson, England; and Oristela Vannieuwenhoven, Panama. They'll talk about gender roles, cultural expectations, education and services as those apply to women in their home countries. The audience will be invited to ask questions.

All four speakers spent their formative years in their home countries, and all now have some association with UW-Green Bay.

Kim, an associate professor of Humanistic Studies (Philosophy) at UW-Green Bay, left her native country to study philosophy in Greece; then came to the United States to earn a Ph.D. degree. She has been a member of the faculty at UW-Green Bay since 1999.

Cole initially came to the U.S. with her late husband who was a graduate student studying in this country. She earned bachelor's and master's degrees at UW-Green Bay, and presently serves as assistant to the director of the Institute for Learning Partnership located on campus.

Robinson was educated in England and came to the U.S. to participate in a semester exchange program at UW-Platteville. There she met her now-husband, which, she says, changed her plans. Robinson is an international student services volunteer at UW-Green Bay and is on the staff of the Office of International Education at UW-Oshkosh.

Marriage also figured in Vannieuwenhoven's move to the U.S. She is a student in Social Change and Development at UW-Green Bay and is an intern with the Office of Admissions where her activities have included designing information sessions aimed at encouraging Spanish-speaking high school students to prepare for college.

Kristy Aoki, international student services adviser at UW-Green Bay, will moderate the panel.

Founded in 1909, International Women's Day is commemorated by the United Nations and observed by women's groups around the world. In some countries, it is a national holiday.

The UW-Green Bay program is sponsored by the Office of International Education. Information is available at (920) 465-5164 or by e-mail to OIE@UWGB.EDU.

(06-44 / 2 March 2006 / VCD)

Session set on national teacher certification

GREEN BAY-The National Board Certification program for teachers is the topic of an information session from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 8 in Phoenix Room C of the University Union at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Dr.

Presenters will be Ron Jetty, Wisconsin Education Association Council (WEAC) teaching and learning consultant and Connie Wolf, a National Board Certified Teacher since 2001. They will explain the program and the benefits to teachers that can be in terms of both finances and status.

The program is sponsored by the Institute for Learning Partnership located at UW-Green Bay and WEAC.

The number to call for registration is (920) 465-5555. More information is available from Juliet Cole at the Institute by calling (920) 465-5094 or e-mailing to colej@uwgb.edu.

(06-43 / 2 March 2006 / VCD)

UW-Green Bay athletic teams show strong academic progress

GREEN BAY - University of Wisconsin-Green Bay athletic teams again ranked well above national averages in a report that measures academic progress of NCAA Division I student-athletes.

The 2004-05 report, which the NCAA released today, shows 12 of UW-Green Bay's 15 Division I sports had Academic Performance Rates above national averages for comparable sports.

UW-Green Bay's rates ranged from 937 for men's basketball, which was 10 points above the national average for Division I men's basketball programs, to perfect scores of 1,000 for four sports — men's golf, men's tennis, women's swimming and women's tennis.

The APR is calculated by allocating points for eligibility and retention — two factors research identifies as the best indicators of graduation prospects. This year's APR report measures two years of data. Eventually, four-year rates will be the basis for evaluating teams' academic success.

A penalty structure, which imposes penalties such as scholarship reductions on sports that fail to meet a cut-off score of 925, goes into effect this year. No UW-Green Bay sport faces penalties for under-performance.

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Bruce Shepard said the rating system is a useful tool that shows the value the NCAA places on academic performance.

"These are values that we've always held at UW-Green Bay and in our athletics program," Shepard said. "It helps all of us when the NCAA holds other institutions to the same high standards."

The chancellor said the academic performance of UW-Green Bay's student-athletes is no accident but is the result of the commitment of the University's athletics administrators, coaches and student-athletes.

UW-Green Bay Athletics Director Ken Bothof thanked the University's faculty and staff for the support they give to student-athletes in and out of the classroom. He also said the APR gives universities and athletics programs greater confidence that they are fulfilling their academic missions.

The NCAA's APR is a "real-time" snapshot of every team's academic performance at a given time. It is considered a more useful assessment of academic success than graduation rates, which rely on a six-year window.

In the NCAA's Graduation Success Rate report, released in December, UW-Green Bay athletic teams had a 90 percent graduation success rate, well above the national average of 76 percent for all Division I schools. The report covered students entering school from 1995 to 1998.

In other indicators of academic success, nine of 15 UW-Green Bay teams achieved a 3.0 or higher team grade-point average during the fall 2005 semester. During that same semester, 62 of 222 student-athletes earned semester honors (grade-point average of 3.5 or higher), including nine with a perfect 4.0 grade-point average.

(06-42 / 1 March 2006 / SH)


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