April 2007

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Jazz groups to perform
May 7


New Music, Hand Drumming ensembles concert

Understanding organizational culture
program


Coaching and Developing Employees program

Choral groups concert

Flute Ensemble,
Chamber Singers to perform


Opera Studio program

Michael Tomasky to lecture

Wind Symphony, Symphonic Band concert

Four finalists for
dean position


Senior art exhibit

Spanish Immersion
and Culture Camp


Space Experience
Summer Camp


Total Guitarist Camp

Grandparents' University

Senior high school summer music camp

Middle school
summer music camp


Jazz on the Bay
summer music camp


Students participate in
Posters in the Rotunda


Workshop to address
eating disorders


High School
Summer Art Studio


Middle School
Summer Art Studio


First Nations Studies
major approved


Faculty speak on
Holocaust


'Brighton Beach Memoirs'
opens April 20


Michael Novak
to speak April 19


Lecture on balance between books and babies

AIC celebrates anniversary

Downtown lecture is
April 19


Workshops on crisis, disaster response

Summer courses for educators

Pow-Wow is April 14

Shepard withdraws from presidency consideration

Workshop: arthropod 'houseguests'

Five to receive Alumni Awards April 14

Phoenix Forum on
global citizenship


Academic Excellence
Symposium is April 11


Phuture Phoenix
becomes part of
UW-Green Bay


Spanish Immersion for
Professionals



[Back to the News Archive]

UW-Green Bay jazz groups to perform
in concert May 7

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay's jazz groups - Jazz Ensemble I, Jazz Ensemble II and the Vocal Jazz Ensemble - will perform an array of contemporary jazz and popular music in concert Monday, May 7 at UW-Green Bay's University Theater.

The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. at the theater in Theatre Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Jazz Ensemble I will perform "All The Things You Are," featuring Nick Boreen and Chris Furkis on saxophones and Zach Grusznski on guitar. Other highlights of the Jazz Ensemble I portion of the concert are "When You're Smiling," featuring Ryan Farley on saxophone, "After You", featuring Grusznski on guitar, "Count Bubba," featuring Furkis and Farley on saxophones and Nick Winkler on trombone, and "The Nearness of You," with Ashley Sprangers on vocal.

Jazz Ensemble II will open its portion of the concert with "It Don't Mean A Thing," featuring Leslie Bormann on saxophone, Ken Bull on trumpet and Ashley Spangers on piano. Jazz Ensemble II also will perform "Speak Low," featuring Anthony Kennedy on saxophone and Richie Dallaire on guitar, "Don't Let Me Be Lonely Tonight," featuring Bormann on saxophone, "Sister Sadie," featuring Kennedy on saxophone and Mirana Freimuth on drums, "Never My Love," featuring Corey Livieri on trombone, and "Minute By Minute," featuring Kennedy on saxophone, Dallaire on guitar and Sprangers on piano.

Jazz Ensembles I and II are directed by UW-Green Bay Director of Jazz Studies John Salerno.

The Vocal Jazz Ensemble, directed by Christine Salerno, will open with "Come Along With Me," with solos by Jessica Plansky and Tim Kiefer. The vocal group then will perform "Fake Plastic Trees," a Radiohead composition arranged by UW-Green Bay student Christian Ott. Soloists on "Fake Plastic Trees" are Matt Fayfer, Ellie Young and Ashley Sprangers.

Other Vocal Jazz Ensemble performances include "Pipoca," "Estate," with solos by Maggie Walsingham, Sarah Robinson and Tim Kiefer, and Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed and Delivered," featuring soloists Molly LeCaptain and Zach Grusznski.

Members of Jazz Ensemble I are Hanna Pozorski and Erin McClure, piano; Zach Grusznski, guitar; Tracy Pachan, bass; Brett Walter, drums; Nick Boreen, Chris Firkus, Ryan Farley, Matt Boreen and Betsy Daharsh, saxophone; Nick Winkler, Tim Kiefer, Joe Bruette and Bill Burroughs, trombone; and Brandon Wirth, Shawn Reince, Laura Mullins and Kyle Schafer, trumpet.

Jazz Ensemble II members are Leslie Bormann, Brianne Faris, Davis Mauk, Kyle Patt, Anthony Kennedy and Mark Henry, saxophone; Ben Reesman and Ken Bull, trumpet; Ken Petrich, Corey Livieri and Carluccio Simon, trombone; Ashley Sprangers, piano; Fletcher Gazella and Kyle Kinzel, bass; Miranda Freimuth, drums; and Richie Dallaire, guitar.

Members of the Vocal Jazz Ensemble are Shannon Kelly, Ashley Sprangers, Maggie Walsingham and Tessa Wegenke, soprano; Molly LeCaptain, Jessica Plansky, Sarah Robinson and Ellie Young, alto; Jacob Ault and Matt Fayfer, tenor; and Justin Foth, Tim Kiefer and Christian Ott, bass. The rhythm section is Miranda Freimuth, drums; Tracy Pachan, bass, Christine Salerno, piano; and Brett Walter, percussion.

Tickets for the jazz concert are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Tickets may be purchased in advance through UW-Green Bay's University Ticketing Service by calling (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587 or by ordering online at www.uwgb.edu/tickets. Tickets also may be purchased at the University Ticketing and Information Center in UW-Green Bay's University Union.

Regular box office services will be available at the theater prior to the performance.

(07-88 / 30 April 2007 / SH)

New Music, Hand Drumming ensembles
to perform in concert Friday

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay New Music Ensemble and Hand Drumming Ensemble will perform in concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday (May 4) in the University Theater at UW-Green Bay.

The theater is located in Theatre Hall on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Cheryl Grosso, professor of Communication and the Arts and Frankenthal professor at UW-Green Bay, and Eric Hansen, UW-Green Bay lecturer in Communication and the Arts, are co-directors of the New Music Ensemble. Grosso directs the Hand Drumming Ensemble.

The nine-member New Music Ensemble will open the concert with "30's" by Jon Gibson (arranged by Hansen as "9:30's"). In this innovative arrangement, students were provided a minimal amount of musical material. After the students arranged the piece for the ensemble, Hansen wrote a final arrangement using an element from each student's arrangement.

The New Music Ensemble also will perform "Pace Interno," written by Grosso, "An Elder's Hocket" by Jo Kondo, "Ophelia" by John Cage, and "Call It A Day" by Grosso. "Call It A Day" includes a driving clarinet solo by Hansen.

The 15-member Hand Drumming Ensemble will perform three pieces written by Grosso, one traditional Afro-Cuban piece and one that is the result of a composition assignment Grosso gave the ensemble.

The Hand Drumming Ensemble's opener, "Rhythm Chant SM/FB," will feature the tap dancing of Jen Schanen. Chris Firkus will play an alto saxophone solo on "Rhythm Chant 8."

Members of the New Music Ensemble are Ben Brecke, tenor saxophone; Bill Burroughs, bass trombone; Betsy Daharsh, alto saxophone; Melissa Dorner, clarinet; Ryan Farley, soprano and alto saxophone; Steven Lambert, percussion; Ken Petrich, euphonium; Charles Simon, tuba; and Arianne Timmers, piano.

Members of the Hand Drumming Ensemble are Chris Dinse, Melissa Dorner, Miranda Freimuth, Anthony Haney, Ben Kotenberg, Jemma Lund, Melissa Merkovich, Ryan Oatman, Mindy Obry, Devon Polzar, Jennifer Schanen, Mandy Scheelk, Michelle Volz, Leigh Wyman, and Brett Walter.

Tickets for the New Music Ensemble and Hand Drumming Ensemble concert are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Tickets may be purchased in advance through UW-Green Bay's University Ticketing Service by calling (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587 or by ordering online at www.uwgb.edu/tickets. Tickets also may be purchased at the University Ticketing and Information Center in UW-Green Bay's University Union.

Regular box office services will be available at the theater prior to the concert.

(07-87 / 30 April 2007 / SH)

Program on understanding organizational culture set for May 16

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Small Business Development Center and the Green Bay Area Chapter of the Society for Human Resources Managers are joining forces to offer a program on understanding and changing your organizational culture.

The program will be held from 1:30 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 16 following the chapter's luncheon at Brett Favre's Steakhouse, 1004 Brett Favre Pass.

The program will provide practical tools for understanding, diagnosing and changing the real power at the heart of an organization.

Participants will learn the following objectives:

defining culture and its role in structuring/influencing every level of an organization.

identifying when a culture is either functional or dysfunctional.

describing the core elements of culture (artifacts, espoused values and underlying assumptions).

diagnosing the health of your organization's culture.

beginning to construct a plan for influencing your culture.

To register for "Understanding and Changing Your Organizational Culture," call (920) 496-9010 or go online at www.uwgb.edu/mdp.

(07-86 / 30 April 2007 / SH)

Small Business Development Center
offers program on coaching employees

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Small Business Development Center is offering a one-day program on coaching and developing employees Tuesday, May 15.

The program, which will run from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., is designed to offer techniques to fully develop employees through coaching.

Participants will learn how to create a culture of growth and how to develop a coaching/development plan for all employees. Participants also will learn why they should not be the only coach and reasons that drive the desire to grow individually.

"Coaching and Developing Employees" will be held at the Business Assistance Center, 2701 Larsen Road, Green Bay.

To register for the program or for more information, call (920) 496-9010 or go online at www.uwgb.edu/mdp.

(07-85 / 30 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay choral groups
to perform in concert May 2

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Concert Choir and Phoenix Chorale will perform in concert Wednesday (May 2) at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Weidner Center's Cofrin Family Hall. Randall Meder, UW-Green Bay director of choral activities, will conduct the performances.

The program will feature two important choral works by 20th century English composer Benjamin Britten: the Missa Brevis in D and Rejoice in the Lamb. Both works will utilize the Wood Family Organ, the Weidner Center's grant instrument that boasts 3,200 pipes, played by Professor Emeritus Arthur Cohrs.

Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Tickets may be purchased in advance through UW-Green Bay's University Ticketing Service by calling (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587 or by ordering online at http://www.uwgb.edu/tickets/. Tickets also may be purchased at the University Ticketing and Information Center in UW-Green Bay's University Union.

Regular box office services will be available prior to the performance at the Weidner Center.

(07-84 / 26 April 2007 / SH)

Flute Ensemble, Chamber Singers
to perform Sunday at Weidner Center

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Flute Ensemble and Chamber Singers will perform in concert Sunday (April 29) at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The concert of chamber music begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Weidner Center's Fort Howard Hall. Admission is free.

Nancy Collins directs the seven-member Flute Ensemble. Randall Meder directs the 10-member Chamber Singers ensemble. Collins and Meder are members of the UW-Green Bay Music faculty.

Members of the Flute Ensemble are Amanda Caldie, Andrea Egan, Brianne Faris, Christine Hillier, Stephany Israeli, Michelle Krebs, and Christina Wold.

The Chamber Singers are Shaina Jacobs, Ashley Sprangers and Tara Vickery, soprano; Sarah Klauck, Aubrey Sutter and Rachel Trempe, alto; Sam Hoganson and Peter Nyenhuis, tenor; and Christian Ott and Jason Szmanda, bass.

(07-83 / 26 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay Opera Studio presents
scenes from American operas

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Opera Studio will present an evening of scenes from American operas at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday (April 27 and 28) in the Jean Weidner Theater of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

Prof. Benjamin Brecher, music and stage director, notes that all the works are sung in English and are accessible to audiences.

The program begins with Samuel Barber's "A Hand of Bridge" and individual scenes from Virgil Thompson's "The Mother of Us All" and Kurt Weill's "Street Scene," among others. The second half is a performance of "The Face on the Barroom Floor" by Henry Mollicone.

"These pieces were chosen for their complex and beautiful music, their characters of substance, and their interesting stories," Brecher said. "The music of each piece is intricate and melodic, even in the more modernist 'The Mother of Us All.'"

The following are the pieces, student voices and roles to be sung:

"A Hand of Bridge" Tara Vickery (Geraldine), Tessa Wegenke (Sally), Jacob Ault (Bill), and Bari Gordon (David).

"The Ballad of Baby Doe" Jacob Ault (Hotel Clerk) and Melanie Riley (Baby Doe).

"The Mother of Us All" Emily Beyer (Susan B. Anthony), Emily Paulsen (Understudy of Susan B. Anthony), Ashley Sprangers (Anne), Leigh Wyman (Gertrude Stein), and Corey Colburn (Virgil T).

"Street Scene" Aubrey Sutter (Mrs. Maurrant), Corey Colburn (Mr. Sankey), Lisa Andre (Mrs. Fiorentino), Shaina Jacobs (Mrs. Jones), Bari Gordon (Mr. Jones), Christian Ott (Mr. Olsen), Shannon Kelly (Rose Maurrant), Liz Kempf and Aubrey Sutter (Nurse Maid Duet), Jacob Kaltenberg (Lippo Fiorentino), and Sarah Klauck (Mrs. Olsen).

"The Face on the Barroom Floor" Jennifer Natsis (Isabelle/Madeline), Jacob Kaltenberg (Larry/Matt), Christian Ott (Tom/John).

Rounding out the production crew are Tiffany Dantinne, costume designer, John Mrovka, lighting designer, and guest painter Dan Klewer. Mary Slavek is assistant music director and pianist.

Brecher, the music and stage director, joined the UW-Green Bay faculty this year after 15 years of performances on the operatic, concert and Broadway stages. He has sung more than 50 opera roles with major opera companies in the United States, France, Italy, Canada, Mexico and England. He has performed 12 roles with the New York City Opera since 1997.

Tickets for the Opera Studio are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Tickets may be purchased through UW-Green Bay's University Ticketing Service by calling (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587 or by ordering online at www.uwgb.edu/tickets. Tickets also may be purchased at the University Ticketing and Information Center in UW-Green Bay's University Union.

(07-82 / 24 April 2007 / SH)

'American Prospect' editor-at-large
to speak at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - Michael Tomasky, editor-at-large of The American Prospect magazine, will talk about "Finally...A Liberal Moment?" on Monday, April 30 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Tomasky will speak at 7 p.m. in Room 250 of Rose Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. His talk is free and open to the public.

Prior to joining The American Prospect, Tomasky was a senior political columnist and contributing editor at New York magazine. He also has worked as an editor and writer at The Village Voice and The New York Observer.

He is author of two books, Left for Dead: The Life, Death, and Possible Resurrection of Progressive Politics in America and Hillary's Turn, an account of New York's U.S. Senate race of 2000.

Tomasky's articles also have been published in The New York Review of Books, Harper's, The New York Times Book Review and The Washington Post. He recently was a Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard University.

Tomasky's lecture is part of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, which is sponsored by UW-Green Bay's Center for History and Social Change. The series brings prominent visiting scholars in the humanities and social sciences, authors and journalists to UW-Green Bay to stimulate conversation and debate on campus.

(07-81 / 24 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay Wind Symphony,
Symphonic Band to perform Wednesday

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band will perform in concert Wednesday (April 25) at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts at UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Weidner Center's Cofrin Family Hall. UW-Green Bay Director of Bands Kevin Collins will conduct.

The Symphonic Band will perform "Blessed Are They" from "A German Requiem" by Johannes Brahms (arranged by Barbara Buehlman), "Slava" by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff (arranged by Doug Wagner), "Lux Aurumque" by Eric Whitacre, and "Joy Revisited" by Frank Ticheli.

The Wind Symphony will open its portion of the concert with "Florentiner" by Julius Fucik. It also will perform the "Courtly Dances" by Benjamin Britten (arranged by Jan Bach) and "Old Home Days" by Charles Ives (arranged by Jonathan Elkus). The Wind Symphony will close with "Slava!" by Leonard Bernstein.

The concert also will feature the State Bound High School Honors Band, which is made up of about 110 student-musicians who have received outstanding ratings for solo performances at district music festivals. UW-Green Bay clarinet instructor Eric Hansen will perform a solo with the honors band.

Tickets for the concert are $7 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Tickets may be purchased in advance through UW-Green Bay's University Ticketing Service by calling (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587 or by ordering online at www.uwgb.edu/tickets. Tickets also may be purchased at the University Ticketing and Information Center in UW-Green Bay's University Union.

Regular box office services will be available prior to the performance at the Weidner Center.

(07-80 / 23 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay names four finalists
for dean position

GREEN BAY - Four finalists will interview for the position of dean of liberal arts and sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

On-campus interviews of the finalists will begin Friday, May 4. The candidates meeting schedules will include presentations to the campus community, which are open to the public.

The finalists and the dates and locations of their campus presentations are:

William Rosa, associate dean, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and professor of Spanish, Montclair State University, Montclair, N.J. (Campus presentation: Friday, May 4, 3 to 4 p.m., 1965 Room, University Union.)

Robert Howe, director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and the Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Professor of Natural Sciences, UW-Green Bay. (Campus presentation: Monday, May 7, 3 to 4 p.m., Alumni Rooms A and B, University Union.)

Scott Furlong, chair of Public and Environmental Affairs, co-director of FOCUS (First-year Opportunities and Connections for UW-Green Bay Students) program, and professor of Public and Environmental Affairs and Political Science, UW-Green Bay. (Campus presentation: Tuesday, May 8, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., 1965 Room, University Union.

Murray Nabors, professor and chair, Department of Biology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi. (Campus presentation: Wednesday, May 9, 3 to 4 p.m., Alumni Rooms A and B, University Union).

The finalists' visits to the campus will include other meetings with administrators, students, faculty and staff. They also will tour the campus and community.

The dean of liberal arts and sciences is one of two academic deans at UW-Green Bay. The other is the dean of professional and graduate studies.

The dean of liberal arts and sciences has administrative and leadership responsibility for programs in humanities, fine and performing arts, natural and applied sciences, and social sciences.

Longtime UW-Green Bay faculty member Fergus Hughes has served as interim dean since July 2004.

(07-79 / 20 April 2007 / SH)

Seniors to exhibit work at Lawton Gallery

GREEN BAY - Seven University of Wisconsin-Green Bay senior art students will display their work in an exhibition that opens Sunday (April 22) in the Lawton Gallery at UW-Green Bay.

The artists are Jenna Bigott, Allison Braatz, Amber Bradford, Don Krumpos, Erica Millspaugh, Zach Roush and Darci White. They are all UW-Green Bay art students who will be graduating this year.

The exhibition opens with a reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday in the Lawton Gallery. The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public. The gallery is located in Theatre Hall Room 230 on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

The exhibition, which continues through Friday, May 4, will showcase photography, installations, and sculptural works. The students plan and install the exhibition.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, call curator Stephen Perkins at (920) 465-2916 or visit the gallery's Web site at www.uwgb.edu/lawton.

(07-78 / 20 April 2007 / SH)

Spanish Immersion Camp for
grades 7-12 starts July 29

GREEN BAY - Students who want to learn or perfect their knowledge of Spanish and the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world can do so at the Spanish Immersion and Culture Camp from July 29 through August 3 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Registration is open now for students in grades 7 through 12.

The intensive program can help students with beginning, intermediate or advanced knowledge of the language. Students will be assigned to skill groups based on results of a test taken prior to camp.

In addition to language skills, students will experience authentic food, sports, crafts and games of various Spanish-speaking countries.

Camp staff members are native speakers from different countries. The camp director is Rosa Nelson, a former Spanish instructor at UW-Green Bay now with the Gibraltor School District. She is fluent in English, Spanish and Italian. Trish Cerritos, Spanish teacher at Washington Middle School in Green Bay, and Jean Tice, Spanish teacher at Sevastopol High School, will serve as classroom teachers at the camp.

Students can attend Spanish Immersion Camp as commuters or as residents who live in UW-Green Bay student housing.

Residents will check in on Sunday, July 29. The camp week begins for all on the morning of Monday, July 30. Daily Monday through Friday sessions will be from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

The camp fee is $235 for commuters and $475 for residents. In addition to instruction, the resident fee includes room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation for evening activities.

More camp information regarding registration, teaching staff and scholarships is online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-77 / 19 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay space camp to offer
hands-on space science, experiences

GREEN BAY - Students entering grades 7 through 12 can conduct space science experiments, participate in neutral buoyancy training, meet an astronaut, and have many other space-related experiences at the Space Experience Summer Camp July 29 through August 3 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Among their experiences, campers will design and program a planetary rover that can rescue a stranded astronaut, sample volcanoes, deploy experiments and perform other tasks. "Cadets" will be trained to use a solar telescope, navigate using the space-based Global Positioning System (GPS), and receive cadet astronaut training.

Special guest Daniel Brandenstein, a retired U.S. Navy captain and former NASA astronaut, will be one of the presenters at the camp. Brandenstein has logged more than 789 hours in space.

The camp director is Jason Marcks, a former high school earth and space science teacher. He has a master's degree in geoscience and presently is working toward a master's degree in aeronautical science. He is the professional development director and lead instructor for the Wisconsin Initiative for Math, Science and Technology Education. Marcks received the 2005 Frank Brewer Award for excellence in aerospace education.

Students can attend the Space Experience Summer Camp as commuters or as residents living in UW-Green Bay student housing. Residents will register on Sunday, July 29. The camp week begins for all students the morning of Monday, July 30. Sessions meet from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Family and friends are invited to the closing camp session at 3 p.m. Friday afternoon.

The camp fee is $235 for commuters and $475 for residents. In addition to instruction, the resident fee includes room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-76 / 19 April 2007 / SH)

Total Guitarist Camp at UW-Green Bay
explores rock, classical, other styles

GREEN BAY - Students entering grades 8 through 12 will explore styles including rock, classical, folk and jazz at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay's new Total Guitarist Camp July 29 through August 3 on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Students of acoustic and electric guitars are encouraged to attend. They will study with lead teachers and guest artists who are professional musicians.

The new camp director is Nick Utrie, who has been performing and promoting music in Green Bay since 1993 in mostly jazz and improvised projects. Utrie has a degree in Guitar Performance with an emphasis in Jazz Studies from UW-Stevens Point.

Other featured instructors include Christopher Olson, a faculty member at McNally Smith College of Music in St. Paul, Minn., Michael Irish, director of jazz studies at Michigan Tech University, Dan Weaver, classical guitarist and guitar teacher at UW-Green Bay and Heid Music, and singer/recording artist Victoria Vox, a graduate of the Boston's Berklee College of Music.

Students can attend the camp as commuters or as residents living in University student housing.

Residents will check in on Sunday, July 29 and have dinner and evening activities on campus. The camp gets under way for all campers with auditions and an all-camp meeting Sunday afternoon following auditions.

Daily sessions are from 8:30 a.m. to 3:20 p.m. Monday through Friday. Students will end the camp by performing in a final public concert at 6:30 p.m. Friday in UW-Green Bay's University Theater.

The camp fee is $239 for commuters and $475 for residents. In addition to instruction, the resident fee includes room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-75 / 19 April 2007 / SH)

Grandparents, grandchildren can learn
together at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - Grandparents and their grandchildren between the ages of seven and 14 can share their love of learning at the two-day Grandparents' University at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Registration is open now for the July 26-27 event, which will allow grandparents and children together to explore a topic of interest in depth and enjoy summer activities on the scenic bayshore campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Participants will choose one course from among five different "majors."

Two different hands-on courses, both taught by members of the UW-Green Bay art faculty, are offered in art. Alison Gates will lead students in the Fiber Arts class through the processes of dying wool, making it into felt, and working the felt into objects. In Christine Style's Wild Animal Prints class, participants will learn the technique of blending wild animal cartoons with the environment.

In the performing arts, Denise Carlson-Gardner will teach tap dance, the program's version of "Happy Feet."

In the sciences, UW-Green Bay faculty member Donna Ritch will lead a popular class in Forensic Science. Students will solve a mystery using some of the techniques of crime scene investigation. Ritch is a member of the Human Biology and Biology faculties. Nutritional Sciences, a new class this year, is taught by Karen Lacey, senior lecturer in Human Biology. Students will explore the art and science of food with hands-on edible experiments.

Students interested in animals and birds may choose the Furs, Feathers and Scales course taught by Thomas Erdman, curator of the Richter Museum of Natural History at UW-Green Bay's Cofrin Center for Biodiversity. Participants can learn about Green Bay's natural biodiversity in the outdoor "laboratory" provided by the Cofrin Arboretum on the campus, and in the unique fossil collections of the Richter Museum.

Grandparents' University starts with registration from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Thursday, July 26 and ends with a graduation ceremony at 1:45 p.m. Friday, July 27.

The fee for Grandparents' University is $120 per adult and $69 per child. The fee includes instruction, activities, a cookout on Thursday night, parking and a t-shirt.

Grandparents' University attendees may commute or choose to stay in UW-Green Bay student suite apartments. The cost for on-campus lodging is a flat rate of $60 for a four-bedroom suite. Commuters and residents alike may purchase a meals package for $20 per person that includes Thursday and Friday lunches and Friday breakfast. Individual meal tickets may be purchased at check-in.

Information and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by calling (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-74 / 18 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay offers music camp for
senior high students

GREEN BAY - Registration is open for the Senior High Band, Orchestra and Choral Camp scheduled for July 22-28 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive. The camp is open to students entering grades 9 through 12.

The camp offers intensive musical instruction appropriate to students' skill levels with emphasis on developing individual abilities. In addition to rehearsals, sectionals, and classes, students will be able to select a special interest course from an array including composition, aural skills and improvisation for the last hour of each day. Monday through Friday classes will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 3:40 p.m.

The camp week begins with auditions and an all-camp meeting on Sunday, July 22 and ends with a final concert at 9 a.m. Saturday, July 28 in the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2008 camp.

UW-Green Bay Director of Bands Kevin Collins leads the camp. Collins directs the UW-Green Bay Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band and teaches conducting and low brass instruments. He founded the UW-Green Bay State-Bound Honor Band for high school students who have received outstanding ratings for solo performances at district music festivals.

A special feature this year is Yamaha guest clinician Adam Frey. Sponsored by Yamaha, IMC Music of Green Bay and the UW-Green Bay Summer Camps, Frey will be offering master classes for brass students and will perform at the Saturday concert.

Camp teachers include faculty members from UW-Green Bay and other colleges and universities and outstanding teachers from middle and high schools.

Students can attend as commuters or as residents living in student housing on campus. The camp fee is $239 for commuters. Resident students will pay $475 that includes in addition to instruction room and board, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by phone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-73 / 17 April 2007 / SH)

Registration is open for UW-Green Bay
Middle School Music Camp

GREEN BAY - Students entering grades 6 through 9 in fall can enroll now for the Middle School Band, Orchestra and Choral Camp July 15-21 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Several camp options are tailored to middle school students. Students entering grades 6 and 7 will participate in "X Band," in which they will be placed by grade level rather than audition. They'll be taught by a team of teachers who specialize in working with young musicians.

Students can attend as commuters or as residents living in UW-Green Bay student housing.

Camp teachers will include faculty members from UW-Green Bay and other colleges and universities and outstanding teachers from middle and high schools.

UW-Green Bay faculty member and director of bands Kevin Collins is the camp director. Collins directs the UW-Green Bay Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band and teaches conducting and low brass instruments. He is the founder of the UW-Green Bay State-Bound Honor Band for high school students who have received outstanding ratings for solo performance at district music festivals.

The upper middle school band conductor is Scott Wright, faculty member in clarinet at the University of Kentucky and formerly a member of the faculty at UW-Green Bay. He presently performs with the renowned New Sousa Band, and is a popular summer festival and camp teacher. Laura Robinson, well-known for her unique and vibrant teaching style, will conduct the "X Band."

The camp week gets underway on Sunday, July 15 with auditions for orchestra and choral students and for band students entering grades 8 and 9. The camp ends with a 9 a.m. concert Saturday, July 21 in the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2008 camp.

The camp fee is $215 for commuters. Resident students will pay $459 which includes in addition to instruction room and board, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-72 / 17 April 2007 / SH)

Jazz on the Bay at UW-Green Bay offers
new summer music camp experience

GREEN BAY - Students entering grades 8 through 12 can sign up for the new Jazz on the Bay summer music camp June 24-30 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

UW-Green Bay jazz faculty artists and camp co-directors, John and Chris Salerno, are combining forces to create this one-of-a-kind jazz experience for instrumentalists and vocalists.

With a multitude of jazz styles and musical genres to choose from, students will have performance opportunities seldom seen in school programs. Their experience will combine vocal jazz ensembles with jazz ensemble instrumentalists, as well as featured tunes from each type of ensemble.

John Salerno, who directs the jazz program at UW-Green Bay, has toured with The Spinners and the Jackson Five and has performed backup for the Four Ladds, Mills Brothers, Bob Hope, Englebert Humperdink, and others.

Chris Salerno directs the UW-Green Bay Vocal Jazz Ensemble, which won an Outstanding Vocal Jazz Ensemble Award at the 2004 Elmhurst College Jazz Festival. She also directs the Lawrence University Jazz Singers who won the 2002 Downbeat Outstanding Vocal Jazz Ensemble award.

Jazz on the Bay begins with auditions and an all-camp meeting Sunday, June 24. Classes meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Students who live on campus will have supervised evening activities.

The week will end with a free public concert at 9 a.m. Saturday, June 30 in UW-Green Bay's University Theatre. Outstanding students will be chosen to receive partial scholarships to the 2008 jazz camp.

Students may attend the camp as commuters or they may live in student housing on the UW-Green Bay campus. Camp fees are $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, the residential fee includes room and board, counselor supervision, and transportation to evening activities.

Camp information is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Information also is available by phone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-71 / 17 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay student researchers
to display projects at state Capitol

GREEN BAY - Fourteen University of Wisconsin-Green Bay undergraduate students will display their research projects Wednesday (April 18) at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison.

The students will participate in "Posters in the Rotunda 2007: A Celebration of Undergraduate Student Research." The annual research symposium brings students and faculty from UW System campuses to the Capitol to share their work with state elected officials, UW System Regents, government representatives and the public.

"Posters in the Rotunda 2007" will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Capitol Rotunda. A brief program will take place at noon. The program will include remarks by Lt. Gov. Barbara Lawton, UW System President Kevin Reilly, UW System Board of Regents President David Walsh, and UW-Eau Claire undergraduate researcher Lori Scardino.

The posters session will allow viewers of students' poster displays to study and review research projects and discuss them with the students.

The following are UW-Green Bay students participating in the posters session, their hometowns, their faculty mentors and academic units, and the titles of their research projects:

Jonathan Cwiak, Green Bay; Brendan Hladilek, Waupaca; and Daniel Kelly, Appleton (Prof. Peter Breznay, Information and Computing Science): JDB DVD Sales: Online E-Commerce Application for DVD Sales.

Victoria Oxendine, Green Bay (Prof. Regan Gurung, Psychology): Reading Between the Lines: A Non-linear Model for Examining How Personality Shapes Cultural Identity Across Differing Social Groups.

Aaron Weinschenk, New Franken (Prof. Terri Johnson, Political Science): Will the Internet Transform Contemporary Campaigning or Sustain the Status Quo?

Shannon Kinderman, Oshkosh (Prof. Regan Gurung, Psychology): Objectifying the Rich and Famous: Does Sex and Celebrity Matter?

Jenny Olson, Oshkosh (Prof. Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges, Psychology and Human Development): The Effects of Sexualized Magazine Advertising on Females' Romantic Relationships.

Brendan Hladilek, Waupaca; Michael Lindsley, Sheboygan; Michael Tipping, Marshfield; Judson Anderson, Neenah (Prof. Peter Breznay, Information and Computing Science): Music Manager - Integrated Media Player and Media Database Application.

Sara Dellemann, Maribel (Prof. Mathew Dornbush, Natural and Applied Sciences): Differences in Epiphytic Tank Bromeliad Abundance Among Four Costa Rican Forests with Varying Land-use Histories.

Nicholas Walton, Fort Atkinson (Prof. Michael Draney, Natural and Applied Sciences): Diversity of Soil-dwelling Invertebrates from Old-field Successional Habitats of Varying Age in the Cofrin Arboretum, Brown County, Wisconsin.

Amanda Jeske, Brown Deer (Prof. Regan Gurung, Psychology): Reducing Childhood Obesity: The Educating Healthy Kids Project.

Reter Ruud, La Crosse (Prof. John Stoll, Economics): Changing Economic Times in Cambodia: An Observational Study.

More information about "Posters in the Rotunda 2007" and a complete list of student presenters and projects is available online at www.wisconsin.edu/posters.

(07-70 / 16 April 2007 / SH)

Workshop to address eating disorders

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will host a daylong workshop on obesity and other eating disorders Friday, May 18.

The workshop, "Eating Behaviors from Anorexia to Obesity," will run from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in UW-Green Bay's University Union on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive. It will be led by Hugh Johnston, a clinical associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry, UW-Madison Medical School and School of Education Psychology.

The conference will address the national epidemic of obesity and related eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia and binge eating. It will provide an overview of the evolutionary underpinnings of eating disorders, a presentation on health risks of insufficient weight and binge eating, and a discussion of how to treat eating disorders.

The workshop offers continuing education credits for social workers and licensed professional counselors.

"Eating Behaviors from Anorexia to Obesity" is sponsored by the Northeast Wisconsin Alliance for Social Worker Continuing Education, a partnership of the UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh Social Work Professional Programs and Outreach Offices.

To register for the workshop or for more information, call (920) 465-2642 or (800) 892-2118. Workshop details and registration also are available online at www.uwgb.edu/outreach/socialwork.

(07-69 / 16 April 2007 / SH)

High school students can register
for UW-Green Bay Summer Art Studio

GREEN BAY - Fashion design-wardrobe, computer animation and printing ingenuity art are just three of the classes available to students at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay High School Summer Art Studio June 24-29 on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Registration is open for the program for students entering grades 8 through 12 in the fall.

Courses include media such as photography, ceramics, jewelry, painting and others. Students enroll for one subject and spend the week exploring that topic in depth. Students will interact with other classes through informal gatherings, critiques, lectures and impromptu exhibitions.

The camp week begins with check-in Sunday and ends with an exhibition of student work at 5 p.m. Friday. Faculty members will choose winners of scholarships to the 2008 Summer Art Studio.

Summer Art Studio classes are taught by experienced educators and artists. Carrie Fonder, sculptor and educator, and Kelli Vardigan, painter and educator, are the co-directors. Both are teachers in the Green Bay Area Public Schools.

Fonder's work has been exhibited nationwide, including in the New York Studio Program and at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Vardigan has exhibited artwork throughout Michigan.

Students may attend UW-Green Bay Summer Art Studio as commuters or they may live in student housing on the campus. All participants will attend daily classes from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Supervised evening activities will be scheduled for residents.

Summer Camps Director Mona Christensen encourages students to seek scholarships to Summer Art Studio, noting that more than half of Summer Studio participants receive full or partial scholarships from parent groups, clubs and other organizations. Also, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction offers some scholarships to students with financial need, and the Wisconsin State Fair offers ten Summer Studio scholarships to participants in its Young People's Art Exhibit.

Summer Studio fees are $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, resident fees cover room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities. Some classes have additional laboratory fees for supplies.

Complete information on teaching staff, scholarships and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. Telephone inquiries may be made to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-68 / 16 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay Summer Art Studio
is open for middle schoolers

GREEN BAY - Registration is open for the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Middle School Summer Art Studio scheduled for June 17-22 on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Students entering grades 6 through 9 are eligible to attend.

Summer Art Studio offers students a variety of classes to choose from. Ceramics, acrylic painting, fabrication sculpture, print-o-matic blast, photography, cartooning, wildlife illustration and fashion design are among the choices. Each student will enroll in two classes, spending a half-day in each.

Experienced educators and artists teach Summer Art Studio classes. Carrie Fonder, sculptor and educator, and Kelli Vardigan, painter and educator, are the co-directors. Both are teachers in the Green Bay Area Public Schools.

Fonder's work has been exhibited nationwide, including in the New York Studio Program and at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Vardigan has exhibited artwork throughout Michigan.

Students may attend UW-Green Bay's Summer Art Studio as commuters or they may live in student housing on the campus. All participants will check in on Sunday of the camp week and attend daily classes from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Supervised evening activities will be scheduled for residents.

The camp week ends with an exhibition of student work from 5 p.m. Friday, June 22 at UW-Green Bay. Faculty members will choose winners of scholarships to the 2008 Summer Art Studio.

Summer Camps Director Mona Christensen encourages students to seek scholarships to Summer Art Studio, noting that more than half of Summer Studio participants receive full or partial scholarships from parent groups, clubs and other organizations. Also, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction offers some scholarships to students with financial need, and the Wisconsin State Fair offers ten Summer Studio scholarships to participants in its Young People's Art Exhibit.

Summer Studio fees are $225 for commuters and $469 for residents. In addition to instruction, resident fees cover room and board for five nights, counselor supervision and transportation to evening activities. Some classes have additional laboratory fees for supplies.

Complete information and registration is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. The Web site includes a complete list of teaching staff for the camp. Telephone inquiries may be made to (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-67 / 16 April 2007 / SH)

Regents approve First Nations Studies
major at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents authorized Friday (April 13) a new First Nations Studies major at UW-Green Bay.

The Bachelor of Arts in First Nations Studies will be implemented for the 2008-09 academic year. The major has been designed to reflect the holistic world view of the indigenous people of Turtle Island (North America) and preserve and promote their sovereign identity.

The program emphasizes the indigenous oral tradition as preserved and shared by Wisconsin's tribal elders. Students will take part in traditional oral learning experiences in the classroom and in tribal communities. Intensive work with tribal elders will be similar to an internship or immersion learning experience.

Fergus Hughes, UW-Green Bay interim dean of liberal arts and sciences, said approval of the First Nations Studies major significantly enhances the opportunities available to UW-Green Bay students.

"It offers a new option both in terms of course content and teaching philosophy," he said. "It allows us to create a learning partnership with the community and an educational exchange in which the University and the community work as a team."

Hughes said no additional resources will be needed for UW-Green Bay to offer the major.

UW-Green Bay's First Nations Studies program will emphasize the tribes of Northeastern Wisconsin, including the Menominee, the Oneida and the Mohican/Stockbridge-Munsee.

The major will meet the ongoing needs of communities in Northeastern Wisconsin to assist American Indian and non-Indian citizens to have the knowledge, skills and understanding to live and work with tribal people, agencies and governments. This understanding is especially important in Northeastern Wisconsin where tribal economies are rapidly expanding and diversifying.

First Nations Studies will be an interdisciplinary program with faculty from the Humanistic Studies and Information and Computing Science academic units. Faculty have backgrounds in a variety of disciplines including education, English, social science, law and linguistics.

UW-Green Bay has a long history of offerings in American Indian studies. The University has offered American Indian studies courses since its founding in the late 1960s. It began an American Indian Studies minor in 1987. Additional course options were developed and the name of the minor was changed to First Nations Studies in 2005.

The new program will be subject to a Board of Regents-mandated review after five years. UW-Green Bay and UW System administration will conduct the review and report results to the Board of Regents.

(07-66 / 13 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay faculty members offer
perspectives on Holocaust

GREEN BAY - Four University of Wisconsin-Green Bay faculty members will offer different perspectives on the Holocaust at a symposium Tuesday (April 17) on the UW-Green Bay campus.

The symposium is from 7 to 9 p.m. in Room 208 of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall at UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive. The event is free and open to the public.

The symposium supports Brown County's "One Book, One Community" reading initiative. The initiative's current selection is "Night," Elie Wiesel's autobiographical account of his survival in the Nazi death camps.

Topics and speakers Tuesday are:

History of the Holocaust Clifton Ganyard, assistant professor of humanistic studies and history.

The Nazi Organization and Bureaucracy Lucy Arendt, assistant professor of management.

Death and Dying Illene Noppe, professor of human development and psychology.

Artisitc Representations of the Holocaust David Coury, associate professor of humanistic studies and German.

Brian Sutton, associate professor of Humanistic Studies, will moderate a question-and-answer session.

The symposium is co-sponsored by the Friends of the Cofrin Library.

(07-65 / 12 April 2007 / SH)

Simon's 'Brighton Beach Memoirs"
opens April 20 at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Theater will present Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 21, and Thursday through Saturday, April 26-28.

John Mariano will direct the play in the University Theater located in Theatre Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Set in the Brighton Beach neighborhood of Brooklyn in 1937, "Brighton Beach Memoirs" is the first play in Simon's autobiographical trilogy. Many people consider it to be Simon's best play.

"It's really about the idea of family," Mariano said. "You're watching the family deal with crises with humor and resolve."

Mariano said the play combines elements of drama and comedy.

"There are serious moments in the play, but that kind of signature Neil Simon humor is there," he said.

Mariano said "Brighton Beach Memoirs" is challenging for both the cast and design team because of the importance of capturing the look and feel of the era. He described the characters as "well-rounded and complicated, but funny."

The cast includes Beth LoCascio as Kate, Sarah Preissner as Blanche, Natalie Bridenhagen as Nora, Katie Pugh as Laurie, Doug Heiar as Stanley, Joshua Weishaar as Eugene, and Matt Fayfer as Jack.

In addition to Mariano, UW-Green Bay faculty members involved in the production are Jeff Entwistle, scenic designer, Kaoime Malloy, costume designer, and Michael Ingraham, lighting designer and technical director.

Student designers are Paul Wilson, sound designer, and Jennie Eisenbrandt, properties designer. Donna Larsen is the stage manager.

Tickets for "Brighton Beach Memoirs" are $15 in advance and $18 at the door for adults and $12 in advance and $15 at the door for seniors and students. Tickets for UW-Green Bay students with identification are $10.

Tickets may be purchased through UW-Green Bay's University Ticketing Service by calling (920) 465-2217 or (800) 328-8587 or by ordering online at www.uwgb.edu/tickets.

(07-64 / 12 April 2007 / SH)

Leading conservative to discuss new book
on Washington at UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - Michael Novak, a prominent author and scholar on religion, philosophy and public policy, will talk about his new book, "Washington's God," on Thursday, April 19 at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Novak will speak at 8 p.m. in Room 250 of Rose Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. His talk is free and open to the public.

Novak's lecture is part of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, which is sponsored by UW-Green Bay's Center for History and Social Change. The series brings prominent visiting scholars in the humanities and social sciences to UW-Green Bay to stimulate conversation and debate on campus.

Novak, a leading conservative thinker, is the George Frederick Jewett Scholar in Religion, Philosophy, and Public Policy and Director of Social and Political Studies at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C.

Novak's latest book, "Washington's God," offers the first in-depth look at the religious life of George Washington. Novak co-wrote the book with his daughter, Jana Novak.

"Washington's God" argues that it was Washington's strong faith in divine Providence that gave meaning and force to his monumental life. The book shows Washington not only as a man of resource, strength and virtue, but as a man with deeply held religious values.

Novak is the author of 25 influential books on the philosophy and theology of culture. The books have been translated into all major languages. His book, "The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism," has been reprinted often in Latin America and was published underground in Poland in 1984, and in Czechoslovakia, Germany, China and Hungary. One reviewer called it "one of those rare books that actually changed the world."

His essays and reviews have been published in The New Republic, Commentary, Harper's, The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, and National Review.

Novak received the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion in 1994. The prize, with a million-dollar purse, was awarded at Buckingham Palace. He delivered the Templeton address in Westminster Abbey.

Among other awards Novak has received are the International Prize by the Institution for World Capitalism, the Antony Fisher Prize for "The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism" presented by Margaret Thatcher, and the Gold Medal of The Pennsylvania Society.

He was twice the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Commission and once to the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.

(07-63 / 12 April 2007 / SH)

Balance between books and babies
is topic of UW-Green Bay lecture

GREEN BAY - An expert on feminism and motherhood in American culture will speak on "The (Delicate) Balance Between Books and Babies: Single Mothers Pursuing Postsecondary Education" on Monday (April 16) at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

The speaker is Jill Duquaine-Watson, an assistant professor of Women's Studies at Texas Woman's University and a 1997 graduate of UW-Green Bay.

Duquaine-Watson's presentation, part of the Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, is at 7 p.m. in Room 250 of Rose Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. The lecture is free and open to the public.

The Historical Perspectives Lecture Series, sponsored by UW-Green Bay's Center for History and Social Change, brings prominent visiting scholars in the humanities and social sciences to the campus to stimulate conversation and debate.

Duquaine-Watson completed her Ph.D. in Women's Studies at the University of Iowa. She has a master's degree in American Studies, also from the University of Iowa, and a bachelor's degree in Social Change and Development from UW-Green Bay.

She teaches courses in feminist pedagogies and images and perspectives of women. She also has made presentations at numerous professional conferences on women's studies.

(07-62 / 12 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay's American Intercultural Center celebrates 35th anniversary

GREEN BAY - Students, alumni, faculty and staff are invited to a celebration Thursday, April 19 of the 35th anniversary of the American Intercultural Center at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

The anniversary celebration is from noon to 2 p.m. at the center, which is located in Room 207 of the David A. Cofrin Library at UW-Green Bay. Lunch will be served, and awards and recognition certificates will be presented.

The American Intercultural Center opened its doors to UW-Green Bay students in March 1972 as the Ethnic Heritage Center.

The center today is a resource for African American, American Indian, Hispanic and Southeast Asian students on campus. It provides services and activities that promote the academic success, personal growth and development of multicultural students.

The center is home to the Black Student Union, Intertribal Student Council, Organizacion Latino Americana, and the Southeast Asian Student Union.

Diana Borrero-Lowe, the center's coordinator, said there is good reason to celebrate the center's history. She is especially hopeful that alumni return to campus for the event.

"The AIC has given support and services to students of color for 35 years, and that is worth celebrating," she said. "Conditions are not perfect for students, but they are better because the AIC has helped create a more positive environment and cultural awareness on campus."

The center also supports the academic mission of UW-Green Bay and contributes to the development of a campus community dedicated to diversity of thought and experience.

"Research shows that the overall student body benefits from the presence of a diverse student body and that different perspectives increase a student's awareness of a more global world," Borrero-Lowe said.

(07-61 / 12 April 2007 / SH)

Downtown lecture April 19 to focus
on impact of sexual violence

GREEN BAY - A University of Wisconsin-Green Bay faculty member who is a social worker and anti-violence advocate will discuss the effects of sexual violence and how to respond to and prevent it in a lecture in UW-Green Bay's "Downtown Third Thursdays" lecture series.

Jolanda Sallmann, assistant professor of Social Work and Women's Studies at UW-Green Bay, will talk Thursday, April 19 about "Sexual Assault Awareness Month: How Far Have We Come? Where Are We Going?" April is national Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

Sallmann's lecture is from 3:40 to 4:20 p.m. at the Baylake Bank Learning Center in the Baylake Bank City Center, 301 N. Adams St. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Registration in advance is requested due to space limitations. To register, contact Bob Skorczewski at UW-Green Bay by phone at (920) 465-2320 or by e-mail at skorczeb@uwgb.edu.

Despite decades of education and prevention efforts, sexual violence remains a significant social problem. Research demonstrates connections between sexual assault and mental health and substance use problems for some, particularly survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Sallmann will provide an overview of Sexual Assault Awareness Month and will examine the prevalence and effects of sexual violence. She is primarily interested in the effects of violence against women and girls on mental health, substance use, crime, poverty and homelessness.

Her lecture is the last in UW-Green Bay's 2006-07 "Downtown Third Thursdays" series. The lecture series provides an opportunity for the community to take part in lifelong learning and learn more about Green Bay's University of Wisconsin. It also aims to enhance the city's downtown and strengthen connections between UW-Green Bay and the community.

The series is sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor at UW-Green Bay, the UW-Green Bay Alumni Association, Downtown Green Bay, Inc., Olde Main Street, Inc., and On Broadway, Inc. in collaboration with the UW-Green Bay Division of Outreach and Adult Access.

More information about "Downtown Third Thursdays" is available online at www.uwgb.edu/downtown.

(07-60 / 11 April 2007 / SH)

Workshops in Kimberly May 3-4
to focus on crisis, disaster response

GREEN BAY - Two workshops in May will help professionals throughout the Fox River Valley area increase their knowledge of best practices in responding to crises and disasters.

"Ethics and Boundaries: Your Responsibilities as a Professional in a Disaster" will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 3. "When Disaster Happens: Strategies for Professionals" will run from 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Friday, May 4. The workshops will be held at the Liberty Hall Conference Center, 800 Eisenhower Drive, Kimberly.

Interested professionals may register for one or both workshops.

The conferences will offer continuing education credits for social workers, licensed professional counselors, child-care professionals, funeral directors and psychologists.

"Ethics and Boundaries" will feature presenter Patricia Ellis of the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services. Participants will identify ethical dilemmas workers are likely to face in crises, disasters and other emergencies. They will learn about past ethical dilemmas and discuss potential decision-making issues in crises and emergencies.

"When Disaster Happens" will feature a keynote presentation by Dan Alesch, professor emeritus of Public Administration at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. He will talk about individual, family and community mental health in the aftermath of disasters.

Alesch has studied long-term disaster recovery in many U.S. communities, interviewing hundreds of residents, business owners and local officials who experienced extreme events in their communities. His work has led him to a greater understanding of the emotional and mental health problems that linger after disasters.

Additional sessions will focus on best practices for early intervention, establishing a volunteer human services response team, and research on modern grief theory.

The workshops are sponsored by the Northeast Wisconsin Alliance for Social Worker Continuing Education, a partnership of the UW-Green Bay and UW-Oshkosh Social Work Professional Programs and Outreach Offices, and by the Fox Valley Mental Health Consortium.

To register or for more information, call (920) 465-2642 or (800) 892-2118. Registration and more details also are available online at www.uwgb.edu/outreach/socialwork.

(07-59 / 11 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay announces summer
courses for educators

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering more than 40 learning opportunities for Northeastern Wisconsin educators this summer.

Among the courses for educators are new offerings including a writing workshop for teachers, a course on lesson planning in socio-emotional learning and a weeklong Spanish immersion opportunity.

Educators are encouraged to register early for the courses, which are aligned with Wisconsin standards for teacher and administrator development and licensure.

UW-Green Bay courses for educators coordinated by the University's Office of Outreach and Extension are designed for teachers and administrators seeking quality credit courses and noncredit programs for license renewal and attainment of professional goals.

For detailed information and to request registration materials, call (920) 465-2480 or (800) 892-2118. More information also is available online at www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach.

The following is a list of courses (and credit options) for summer 2007.

Beginning in June
Spanish for Educators 1, June 14, June 19, June 21, June 22; Green Bay. Options for noncredit, undergraduate or graduate credit.
Practical Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners, June 12-13 (noncredit and one graduate credit options), June 12-15 (two graduate credits); Clintonville.
Book Club...en espanol, June 18, June 29, August 3, August 10; Green Bay. Options for noncredit or one graduate credit.
Developing Good Comprehension Habits in All Readers, June 18-22, Green Bay. Three graduate credits.
Creating Meaningful Learning Experiences for Students through Literacy, Literature, and Arts Integration, June 25-29, Green Bay. Noncredit or one graduate credit options.
Boys in Crisis, June 26-28, Green Bay. One graduate credit.
Teaching Exceptional and At-Risk Students Through Fine Arts Activities, June 18-22, Green Bay. Noncredit or one graduate credit options.
Aspergers Syndrome: Strategies for Solving the Social Puzzle, June 18 (noncredit option), June 18-19 (one graduate credit); Green Bay.
Teaching Biological Principles with Plants, June 13-14, July 12; Green Bay. Options for noncredit or one graduate credit.
Astronomy in the Elementary School, June 13-15, Sturgeon Bay. One graduate credit.
Teaching Wisconsin Wildlife, June 18-19 (noncredit option), June 18-20 (one graduate credit); Sturgeon Bay.
American Indian Studies Summer Institute, June 25-29, Oneida. Three undergraduate credits or three graduate credits.
Classroom Instruction That Works, June 19-21 (Offering 1 - noncredit or one graduate credit options), Green Bay; June 25-28 (Offering 2 - one graduate credit), Sheboygan.
Technology for Teaching and Learning, June 18-21, Mishicot. Noncredit or two graduate credit options.
Electronic Portfolios: Powerful Professional Improvement Tool, June 25-26 and July 16-17, Mishicot. Two graduate credits.
Tribes: A New Way of Learning and Being Together, June 25-28 (Offering 1), July 9-12 (Offering 2); Green Bay. Noncredit or two graduate credit options.

Beginning in July
PowerPoint: Present with Pizzazz, July 12-13, Mishicot. Noncredit or one graduate credit options.
Artistry for Learning: The Research-Based Components of the Developmental Process of Tribes Learning Communities, July 16-19, Green Bay. Noncredit or two graduate credit options.
Lesson Planning in Socio-Emotional Learning, July 23-26; Green Bay. Noncredit or two graduate credit options.
Facilitating and Assessing Writing Using the Six+1 Traits, July 10-12 and July 24-26, Green Bay. Three undergraduate or three graduate credit options.
Writing Workshop for Teachers, July 23-26, Sevastopol. Noncredit or two graduate credit options.
Assessment of Writing Using the Six Traits, July 17-18 and July 23, Green Bay. One graduate credit.
Summer Instructional Technology Academy, July 27-August 6, Manitowoc. One undergraduate credit; one, two or three graduate credit options.
Leaderhood: Inspired Leadership for Today's Workforce, July 16-17, Green Bay. Noncredit or one graduate credit options.
Introduction to Understanding By Design, July 23-26, Sheboygan. One graduate credit.
Assessment Literacy: A Practical Approach to Classroom Assessment, July 16-19; Sheboygan. One graduate credit.
Learning Basic Skills in Sign Language 1, July 23-27, Green Bay. One undergraduate credit.
Learning Basic Skills in Sign Language 2, July 30-August 3, Green Bay; One undergraduate credit.
Beginning Guitar, July 9-13, Green Bay. Noncredit.
Intermediate Guitar, July 23-25, Green Bay. Noncredit.
Differentiated Instruction, July 31-August 3, Sheboygan (Offering 1); August 13-16, Green Bay (Offering 2). One graduate credit.
Introduction to Differentation and Gifted Education, July 16-20, Green Bay. Three graduate credits.
Classroom Management Strategies for ALL Students, July 9-12, Sheboygan (Offering 1); July 16-19, Sheboygan (Offering 2). One graduate credit.
Einstein Academy 1, July 30-August 3 and a follow-up session Jan. 8, 2008, De Pere. One graduate credit.

Beginning in August
Western Geology for Teachers, August 12-22, various locations in Colorado and Wyoming. Four graduate credits.
Spanish Immersion for Professionals, August 13-17, Sturgeon Bay. Noncredit, two undergraduate or graduate credit options.
Literacy Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities, August 6-10, Green Bay. Noncredit or one graduate credit options.
Practical Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners, August 13-14 (one graduate credit option), August 13-16 (two graduate credit option); Sheboygan.
Conflict Resolution, August 8-9, Green Bay. Noncredit or one graduate credit options.
Basic Active Learning Strategies, August 1-2 (noncredit option), August 1-2 and Oct. 15 follow-up session (one undergraduate or graduate credit options); Green Bay.
Supervision of Student Teachers, August 13 (noncredit option), August 13-14 and August 20 (one graduate credit option); Green Bay.
Web Page Creation and Editing, August 13-16, Mishicot. Noncredit or two graduate credit options.

(07-58 / 11 April 2007 / SH)

15th annual UW-Green Bay Pow-Wow
is April 14

GREEN BAY - The 15th annual Pow-Wow at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will be from noon to 10 p.m. Saturday (April 14) in the Phoenix Sports Center.

Grand entries are scheduled at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. A feast for all is at 5 p.m.

The Pow-Wow, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the UW-Green Bay Intertribal Student Council, the American Intercultural Center and the Office of Student Life. The event brings people together through traditional Native American culture.

Head dancers will be Jessica VanZile and Eugene Webster. Dan King will serve as master of ceremonies, and David Turney will be the arena director.

Str8 Across will be the host drum. Invited drums include Duck Creek Crossing, Niwiwan, Wind Eagle and Spirit Bear.

The event will include a guest performance by Wade Fernandez, a musician, songwriter and recording artist. Fernandez, who was born and raised on the Menominee Reservation, has performed at festivals and other events across the United States and Canada. He has performed with various artists including Jackson Browne and the Indigo Girls.

Vendors at the Pow-Wow will offer food and a variety of crafts for sale.

(07-57 / 10 April 2007 / SH)

Shepard withdraws from consideration
for Western Michigan presidency

GREEN BAY - University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Chancellor Bruce Shepard today withdrew from consideration as a finalist for the position of president of Western Michigan University.

The chancellor said he greatly appreciated the opportunity to be considered for the presidency of such an outstanding university. However, he said he is excited about the bright future of UW-Green Bay and the New North region.

"Green Bay and its University of Wisconsin are like family to Cyndie and me," he said today in a message to UW-Green Bay faculty and staff. "We are delighted to be part of that family, and we look forward to continuing to work on many exciting projects and initiatives on campus and in the community."

Shepard had been scheduled to visit the Western Michigan campus in Kalamazoo and interview for the university's presidency later this month.

The chancellor reiterated that recruitment by other institutions reflects the fact that the accomplishments of the entire UW-Green Bay community are being recognized well beyond Wisconsin.

Shepard has been chancellor of UW-Green Bay since Nov. 1, 2001. He is the fourth chancellor in the University's history.

(07-56 / 9 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay workshop looks at
arthropod 'houseguests'

GREEN BAY - A University of Wisconsin-Green Bay biologist will talk about arthropod "houseguests" and what to do about them at a workshop Saturday (April 14) at UW-Green Bay.

Michael Draney, associate professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, will discuss "Uninvited guests: arthropods in your house and what to do with them" at the workshop from 9 a.m. to 12 noon at UW-Green Bay's Cofrin Center for Biodiversity. The center is located in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall Room 212 on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive.

Draney's presentation is the latest in the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity free workshop series, which runs through May. The series is part of the center's mission to promote biodiversity protection through education and scientific research.

Draney will introduce some of the fascinating animals likely to be found in Wisconsin homes, including spiders and a veritable host of insects.

Using biology as a guide, the workshop will consider what, if anything, to do about these uninvited guests. Attendees may bring animals for show-and-tell and should be prepared to ask questions after the presentation. The workshop also will focus on when to consider using pesticides, as well as alternatives to pesticides.

To register for the workshop, contact Kim McKeefry by e-mail at mckeefrk@uwgb.edu or call (920) 465-5032 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. For more information about the workshop series and the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, visit the center's Web site at http://www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/.

(07-55 / 9 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay Alumni Association
to honor five graduates April 14

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Alumni Association will honor five graduates for their accomplishments at the association's annual awards night Saturday, April 14.

Receiving Distinguished Alumni Awards will be Kathleen Christensen, director of the Program on the Workplace, Work Force and Working Families at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in New York; Mike Jackson, president and chief operating officer of Supervalu Stores Inc. in Eden Prairie, Minn.; and Wayne Micksch, president of Quality Insulation and Asbestos Removal Inc. of Green Bay.

Outstanding Recent Alumni Awards will be presented to Joseph Carroll, assistant professor of ophthalmology and biophysics at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and Ma Manee Moua, assistant attorney general with the Wisconsin Department of Justice.

The Outstanding Recent Alumni Award recognizes alumni within 10 years of graduation whose accomplishments indicate potential for future achievement.

The Alumni Association Awards Night will be held in the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts at UW-Green Bay, 2420 Nicolet Drive. The event begins with a reception at 5 p.m., with dinner at 6 p.m. and the recognition program to follow.

Tickets are $25 per person. To reserve tickets, contact Mark Brunette by phone at (920) 465-2586 or by e-mail at brunettm@uwgb.edu.

The following are brief profiles of the Alumni Association award winners:

Kathleen Christensen graduated from UW-Green Bay in 1973 with a degree in Urban Analysis. Under her leadership, the Workplace, Work Force and Working Families program has played a vital role in developing work-family scholarship and in supporting effective workplaces that meet the needs of working parents and older workers.

Prior to joining the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, she was a professor of psychology at the Graduate School and University Center of City University of New York. She previously served as a policy analyst at the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C.

Christensen has published extensively on the changing nature of work and its relationship to the family. She also is a consultant and adviser to federal and state committees on work-family issues.

Mike Jackson graduated from UW-Green Bay in 1976 with a degree in Managerial Systems. As president and chief operating officer for Supervalu, he is responsible for implementing the Twin Cities-based grocery giant's strategic vision.

Jackson began his Supervalu career in 1979 as a retail counselor with the company's Green Bay division. During his 27-year tenure, he has held positions throughout the company in both supply chain services and retail operations.

He is on the advisory board for the Carlson School of Management's Institute for Research in Marketing and is a trustee of the board for "Food for All," a domestic and international anti-hunger organization.

Wayne Micksch graduated from UW-Green Bay in 1974 with a degree in Managerial Systems. He and his wife, Ginger, have been generous supporters of UW-Green Bay and other community causes and institutions.

Micksch served two years on the UW-Green Bay Founders Association board of directors and has supported the Phoenix Fund through his company.

Wayne and Ginger received the Outstanding Fundraising Volunteer Award at the recent National Philanthropy Day Awards. They received the Notre Dame Academy 1998 Founders Award in recognition of their service, involvement and commitment to Catholic education in the Green Bay and De Pere area.

Joseph Carroll is a 1997 UW-Green Bay graduate with a degree in Human Biology. He has a Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology from the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Carroll, who takes a multidisciplinary approach to study of the human visual system, was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Visual Science at the University of Rochester in Rochester, N.Y., and also for the Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Carroll has taught at the Medical College of Wisconsin, the University of Rochester and Mount Mary College. He has been published in numerous papers, journals and books, and has been a guest speaker at many international conferences.

Ma Manee Moua graduated from UW-Green Bay in 1999 with a degree in Philosophy. She was co-recipient of the UW-Green Bay Outstanding Student Award. She received her law degree from the UW-Madison Law School in 2002.

While attending law school, she received numerous scholarships and awards, including the Fred Suhr Award for scholarship, the Association for Women Lawyers' Annual Scholarship, and the Bruce F. Beilfuss Memorial Award. She also served as president of the Wisconsin International Law Journal.

She is a board member of United Asian Services of Wisconsin and a member of the Dane County and Wisconsin bar associations.

(07-54 / 6 April 2007 / SH)

Phoenix Forum to focus on
global citizenship

GREEN BAY - Students and others with diverse backgrounds and viewpoints will discuss what it means to be a global citizen Tuesday (April 10) at the fourth annual Phoenix Forum at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

The aim of the forum is to encourage civil public discussion of important, but often contentious, political and social issues.

The student-led forum will include sessions at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. in Phoenix Rooms A and B of UW-Green Bay's University Union.

About 400 university and high school students are expected to participate. Community members also are welcome.

The guest speaker will be Seth Green, president of Americans for Informed Democracy, a nonpartisan organization working to raise global awareness. Green is an expert on U.S. relations with the Muslim world, U.S. development assistance policy, international law, and globalization.

Green will give an opening keynote speech and also will be available later in the forum for additional comments and discussion.

After the opening session, participants will disperse into six discussion groups. Topics for discussion include:

Energy use through the eyes of a world citizen.

How does global immigration affect different segments of a population in a country losing people?

Global warming: What is our responsibility?

Are celebrities global citizens?

Foreign policy with a focus on the war in Iraq.

Human rights and civil liberties: A global perspective.

The Phoenix Forum is organized by UW-Green Bay's Public and Non-Profit Management class, which is taught by Prof. Denise Scheberle. The Civics Club and Good Times Programming are assisting in sponsoring the event.

(07-53 / 5 April 2007 / SH)

Sixth Academic Excellence Symposium
set for April 11

GREEN BAY - University of Wisconsin-Green Bay students will display their scholarly and creative work Wednesday (April 11) at the University's sixth annual Academic Excellence Symposium.

About 120 of UW-Green Bay's best and brightest students will exhibit more than 60 projects at the Symposium, which runs from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Winter Garden Lounge of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall on the UW-Green Bay campus.

Student presenters will set up poster displays and other types of exhibits to showcase their research and creative work. Presenters will be available to discuss the projects with visitors.

Students, faculty, staff and community members are welcome to attend the Symposium.

Presenters are from the business administration, communication and the arts, human biology, human development, information and computing science, natural and applied sciences, nursing, public and environmental affairs, and social change and development academic units.

UW-Green Bay faculty members nominated students for the Symposium. It provides the campus and community with an opportunity to learn more about the interesting work being done across the campus.

The Academic Excellence Symposium is sponsored this year by the Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Phi Kappa Phi honor society.

(07-52 / 5 April 2007 / SH)

Phuture Phoenix becomes part of 'fabric'
of UW-Green Bay

GREEN BAY - The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is strengthening its ties to Phuture Phoenix, a program that encourages at-risk youngsters to graduate from high school and pursue a college education.

The result will be greater long-term stability for the program and increased educational opportunities for UW-Green Bay students.

The Institute for Learning Partnership at UW-Green Bay is taking over administrative responsibility for Phuture Phoenix, which has been run by volunteers since its founding in 2003. The Institute is a collaborative effort involving community partners working to improve learning for students in pre-kindergarten through post-secondary education.

A new Phuture Phoenix class in UW-Green Bay's Education program, which started this year, already is enhancing the teaching skills of UW-Green Bay students. The class, taught by Phuture Phoenix director and co-founder Cyndie Shepard, focuses on what she calls "teacher disposition," or role modeling and mentoring that are part of being a quality teacher.

A stronger relationship between Phuture Phoenix and the University bodes well for the program's future, said Shepard, who will continue to serve as Phuture Phoenix director.

"We're becoming part of the fabric of UW-Green Bay, not just a program that's out here like a little satellite," she said.

John Crubaugh, interim director of the Institute for Learning Partnership, said the Institute and Phuture Phoenix are a perfect fit.

"In the long run, we'll be able to help Phuture Phoenix because of our contacts with K-12 schools," he said.

Phuture Phoenix targets schools with high percentages of students from low-income families. Students involved in the program visit the UW-Green Bay campus when they are in fifth grade and continue to work with student mentors from the University throughout the school year.

Shepard said the benefits of Phuture Phoenix flow in two directions.

"We're helping these kids all the way through 12th grade stay in school, and at the same time we're helping UWGB students develop their teaching and leadership skills," she said.

Crubaugh said Phuture Phoenix already has a solid foundation on which the Institute can help continue to build.

"It's a marvelous program," he said. "It gives kids an opportunity to get inside the door of the University and explore."

Phuture Phoenix has received numerous statewide accolades. Gov. Jim Doyle said the program is a model for the Wisconsin Covenant, a plan to increase access to a UW education. In 2004, Phuture Phoenix was awarded the state's first Ann Lydecker Award for Education, which recognizes innovative practices for diversity.

Shepard said volunteers will continue to play a key role in Phuture Phoenix. She said volunteers, including co-founder Ginny Riopelle, are helping raise money for college scholarships for students who go through the Phuture Phoenix program. The first students to participate in the program will graduate from high school in three years, she noted.

(07-51 / 5 April 2007 / SH)

UW-Green Bay offers summer
Spanish immersion for professionals

GREEN BAY - A new summer learning opportunity offered by the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is designed to meet the changing needs of professionals who are in contact with Spanish-speaking customers.

Registration is open for Spanish Immersion for Professionals, an intensive week of study, cultural understanding and fun. Classes will be held Aug. 13-17 at Stone Harbor Resort in Sturgeon Bay in the heart of the popular Door County tourist destination.

The program is aimed at front-line professionals, including customer-service representatives, call-center employees, hospitality workers, bankers, teachers and health-care professionals.

Classes tailored specifically to a number of career fields will be mixed into the language and grammar components of the program. These fields include health care, education, business, law and leisure.

UW-Green Bay Spanish faculty and native Spanish speakers will provide 30 hours of instruction. Participants will quickly learn conversational phrases needed in their professions and will develop a deeper understanding of the grammar and written language structure of Spanish.

Classes will run from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily. Optional evening activities, which will continue the immersion experience, also will be available.

The program includes non-credit and credit options. Educators interested in graduate credit should contact Annie Lietzow at (920) 465-2480 or (800) 892-2118.

More information, including fee and room reservation information, is available online at www.uwgbsummercamps.com. More information also is available by telephone at (920) 465-2267 or (800) 892-2118.

(07-50 / 4 April 2007 / SH)

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