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Archives and ARC

Oral Histories

In 2009, the University Archives partnered with the UWGB Retirees Association to begin an oral history program. Oral histories are conducted with former UWGB faculty, staff, students, alumni, and community supporters. If you would like to be involved as an interviewer or interviewee, please contact us at archives@uwgb.edu

To date, this Oral History Project has completed seventy interviews. Topics discussed in the interviews include founding of the campus; curriculum; the early Academic Plan and interdisciplinarity; experiences as students and employees; teaching; organizational structure; campus buildings; Liberal Education Seminars; athletics; and the music program

These interview summaries below are just the beginning! If you would like to explore these interviews further, you may do so in the Archives. Check back for updates as more interviews and summaries are completed.

A

Dan Alesch

  • At UWGB: 1976-2001 (Professor, Public and Environmental Affairs: Political Science)
  • Interviewed: 10 July 2013
  • Interviewer: Ron Stieglitz
  • Length: 50 Minutes
  • Abstract: Professor Alesch was working for the Rand Corporation as a senior policy analyst when he was recruited to join the Public and Environmental Administration faculty at UWGB in 1976. In addition to his teaching and research at UWGB, Professor Alesch served on the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission for 25 years. Topics covered in this interview include: change in student population from1976 to 2001; the factors that played into the change in the original academic plan first envisioned by Chancellor Weidner; and the development of a business administration program at UWGB. Professor Alesch comments on his experience in teaching a senior seminar and in the graduate program where he supervised over ninety-five theses.

Kathy Anderson & Mary Ellen Kolka Moser

  • Interviewed: 5 July 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 46 minutes
  • Abstract:

    This interview focuses on the founding and end of University League (1966-1998) and Mary Ellen Kolka Moser’s experiences as a faculty wife and staff member at UWGB.

    Both Kathy Anderson and Mary Ellen Kolka Moser were active members of the University League. They explained the League’s role in providing social, educational and service programs that benefited the University, staff spouses and the community.

    The League’s Knapsack Storytellers presented programs through-out the community in schools and other venues. Mary Ellen talks fondly about the scripts and hats used by University faculty and spouses to act out children’s stories, to promote the fun of reading to children. Kathy and Mary Ellen talk about other League activities including Second Gear; activities promoting “Eco U”; and ideas of recycling and reuse. Both recall several anecdotes about participating in a variety of League activities.

    Mary Ellen talks about her experiences leading a group of students, along with her husband, on a January practicum trip to Mexico City (part of the Liberal Education Seminar program). She was also part of the TV series produced at UWGB titled The Consumer Experience where she developed and delivered practical segments on consumer issues to complement the material presented by David Ward.

Kathy Anderson, Lenora Rhyner, & Sandy Starkey

  • Interviewed: 12 November 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Abstract:

    Kathy Anderson, Lenora Rhyner and Sandy Starkey were early members of the University League which was a group started in 1966 to support the University. Membership was originally restricted to women who were either faculty members, wives of faculty, women of the administrative staff or women who had an interest in the University. Membership was eventually open to men.

    In this short video tape, Kathy, Lenora and Sandy talk about the many activities (dinner groups, Christmas parties, craft groups, Knapsack Storytellers) sponsored by the University League as well as their fund raising activities including Second Gear, a thrift shop operated on campus. Profits from fund raisers were used to support a variety of University endeavors and included mini-loans and grants to students.

B

Zeke Backes

  • At UWGB: Business Administrator (1968-1982); Assistant Chancellor of Fiscal and Administrative Services (1982-1991)
  • Interviewed: 21 February 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 58 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Cyril (Zeke) Backes started working at UW-Green Bay in the late 1960s as a Business Manager and retired from the University as Assistant Chancellor for Business and Finance.

    During that time Zeke provided general supervision over preparation of budgets and facilities. This conversation focuses on Zeke’s experiences and in particular on how the budget and the budget process changed over time. Other topics covered include the physical development of the campus, Bay Fest, Division 1 Athletics and the Weidner Center.

Bob Bauer

  • Interviewed: 6 June 2012 and 20 June 2012
  • Interviewer: John Thron
  • Length: 68 minutes (6 June) and 70 minutes (20 June)
  • Abstract:

    In these conversations, Bob Bauer provides information on his personal history, particularly the development of his interest in music. Further topics include his initial hiring and interview process; the role of music in the curriculum; music students who graduated; LES; the Marching Band and its trips to Switzerland and Romania; the music program itself; his administrative career; and being Chair of the Steering Committee for the Performing Arts Center (now Weidner Center).

Betty Brown

  • At UWGB: 1968-1990 (Director of News Services)
  • Interviewed: 22 August 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 42 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Betty Brown retired in 1990 after serving for many years as the director of News and Publications at UW-Green Bay. This conversation focuses on the early years of the University when it was necessary to introduce the University to the community and develop good town/gown relationships. Betty talks about her role in developing presentations and working with area print media outlets.

Lyle Bruss

  • At UWGB: Director of Facilities Planning (1971-1994); Professor of Education (1979-1990); Director of School Services Bureau (1976-1990)
  • Interviewed: 8 August 2011
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 16 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Dr. Lyle Bruss was UW-Green Bay Campus Planner for many years (among other titles he held during his career at UW-Green Bay). In this conversation, Lyle begins by providing information on his personal history and being hired for UW-Green Bay. During the interview, Lyle discusses his first impression of campus and campus leadership; the role of the State Building Commission and methods for project approval; the merger of the UW System; first impressions of UWGB mission and curriculum; master plan; heat/ chill plant location; property acquisition; campus design (connections to curriculum and response from community); student housing; Cofrin Arboretum; his roles on campus over the years; working with state agencies; budget matters; role of Chancellors; and changes in campus over time.

Lyle Bruss

  • At UWGB: Director of Facilities Planning (1971-1994); Professor of Education (1979-1990); Director of School Services Bureau (1976-1990)
  • Interviewed: 20 August 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 29 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Dr. Lyle Bruss was UW-Green Bay Campus Planner for many years (among other titles he held during his career at UW Green Bay). In this conversation, Lyle reviews the Comprehensive Development Plan prepared by architects in 1967 by Daverman Associates (see Archives for copy of plan referenced). Bruss specifically talks about the following: Environmental Sciences Building; Community Science Buildings (Rose and Wood Halls); Library Learning Center; Shorewood Club; Phoenix Sports Center; use of temporary buildings; and the process of getting a project completed. (Note: the focus of another interview with Dr. Bruss covers the actual physical development of the campus.)

Lyle Bruss

  • At UWGB: Director of Facilities Planning (1971-1994); Professor of Education (1979-1990); Director of School Services Bureau (1976-1990)
  • Interviewed: 1 November 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 4 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Dr. Lyle Bruss was UW-Green Bay Campus Planner for many years (among other titles he held during his career at UW Green Bay). In this conversation, Lyle talks about acquisition of bayshore properties (including Lambeau cottage) and the initial design of the campus. He explains many of the terms used in the document (e.g. surge space, learning streets, academic core). This plan was designed for 20,000 students by the year 2000, something that did not occur. As a result many of the ideas in the original plan never came to fruition. The interview then turns to non-contiguous property that is maintained by UW-Green Bay. These include Toft Point, Peninsula Sanctuary property, Kingfisher Farm and Point Au Sable.

Bob and Carol Bush

  • At UWGB: University Friends. Bob Bush was also a lecturer in Managerial Systems (1973-1974)
  • Interviewed: 27 January 2011
  • Interviewer: Betty Baer
  • Length: 1 hour, 3 minutes
  • Abstract:

    The interview features Bob and Carol Bush, community members who were long time supporters of campus as well as friends of Chancellor Weidner and Rudy Small. In this interview, they discuss the community response to UW-Green Bay, including its unique class names; the fight to get the Shorewood site location; the early years of the university; the strength of the accounting and business programs, including a business class taught by Bob; the hiring of Chancellor Bruce Shepard and his emphasis on community connections; Chancellor Weidner’s personality and personal relationships, and their continuing relationship with the University.

Dave Buss

  • At UWGB: 1969-1982 (UWGB Men’s Basketball Head Coach; Assistant Athletic Director)
  • Interviewed: 8 February 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 99 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Dave Buss became UWGB’s first basketball coach. He was hired to develop a men’s program from the ground up with the ultimate goal of becoming a Division 1 team. Dave achieved that goal in less than fourteen years. Along the way Dave’s teams made two trips to the NAIA final round. Dave shares memories of recruiting efforts, games played, budget issues and the young men on his teams in this conversation.

C

Arthur Cohrs

  • At UWGB: 1968-2000 (Professor, Communication and the Arts: Music)
  • Interviewed: 23 April 2012
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 54 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation, Arthur Cohrs provides background information on himself and his jobs prior to UWGB. He discusses the transition from the two year Green Bay Center campus to a four year university. He particularly mentions student recruitment, faculty, and Liberal Education Seminars. He describes choosing pianos for the campus and Weidner Center; role and experiences with UWGB summer camps; his role in community music endeavors; and his favorite pieces of music.

Eleanor Crandall

  • At UWGB: Publications Editor (1968-1976); Coordinator, Publications (1971-1973); Director of Publications (1973-1977)
  • Interviewed: 12 September 2012
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation, Eleanor Crandall discusses her early life: employment after earning her Bachelor of Arts degree; hiring procedures for herself and her husband, Coryl Crandall; first impressions of UWGB and Green Bay; the development of UWGB catalog; department work and staff members in the News Bureau; community reaction to publications; experiences as first affirmative action director on campus; and career after UWGB.

D

Jack Day

  • At UWGB: 1970-1994 (Professor of Natural and Applied Sciences: Earth Sciences)
  • Interviewed: 22 August 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 41 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Harold (Jack) Day joined the UWGB faculty in 1970 as the Chair of Environmental Controls (a department name no longer in use). Before joining UWGB, Jack had served in the US Navy, completed a pHD in Civil Engineering from UW-Madison, worked in the paper industry for several years and served on the faculty of the Carnegie Institute. He brought with him a lifelong interest in water and how it impacts all features of our society including people, land use, and cultures. In this interview Jack talks about his experiences prior to 1970 and the factors that influenced his decision to join the UWGB faculty. Jack and his wife were part of a team of faculty members who offered a January interim course (part of the LES requirements) in the Yucatan Peninsula. He talks about the impact this international experience had on students. Jack was also a member of the Metropolitan Sewerage District Board for 29 years, serving as its president for much of that time and playing a significant role in the time period when the current regional modern day sewer system was being developed. Jack reflects on the changes that have occurred in the academic program, in particular the reduction in the environmental focus of the early curriculum. A follow up interview focuses on Jack’s involvement in international organizations.

Jack Day

  • At UWGB: 1970-1994 (Professor of Natural and Applied Sciences: Earth Sciences)
  • Interviewed: 4 September 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 32 minutes
  • Abstract:

    This is a follow up interview to one conducted on August 22, 2013. The focus of this interview is on Professor Day’s research activities and work on several United Nations projects. In 1975 Jack was appointed the Director of Institute for Research on Environmental Change, a senior administrative position reporting to newly appoint Dean John Reed. The goal of the Institute was to find external funding (research grants) for environmental research. Although the Institute was successful in obtaining some grants, in Jack’s words – “the institute was a failure” and was dissolved when a new Dean (George Rupp) was appointed.

    Jack’s research interests date back to his time at Carnegie Institute before taking a position at UWGB in 1970. He was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and published several papers on developing techniques for minimizing flood damage in flood prone areas. Throughout his career at UWGB, Jack’s research focus was on water resources.

    As discussed in the prior interview, Jack served on the Metropolitan Sewerage District Board for 29 years (1970-1999). Jack also conducted research projects on factors contributing to contaminated rivers and river basins and developing recommendations minimizing future contaminations.

    After his retirement in 1994, Jack spent several years working on projects for the United Nations Industrial Development Organization. He talks about several of these including a three year project in Vietnam. Jack was instrumental in developing an international seminar focusing on water resource issues that meets biannually in countries around the world – the most recent in Spain in June, 2013.

    Jack has visited more than 45 countries and made over 100 international trips during his career. Jack shares his take on the current status of water resource issues – both sobering reality and exciting possibilities – and his best guess on what our world will look like (environmentally) in 40 years. This conversation includes a thoughtful discussion on what water resource issues have been, are and will be, as well as, what is needed to make necessary changes.

Mabel Debaker

  • At UWGB: 1968-2000 (Program Assistant in various departments)
  • Interviewed: 5 March 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 42 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Mabel DeBaker first started working in the budget office at the University in the late 1960s. She worked in several support roles through the years ending her career in the Purchasing Department. Mabel reminisces about her experiences when first hired; co-workers; how office work evolved; and how the campus changed through the years.

Jerry Dell

  • At UWGB: (Jerry Dell) 1973-2003 (Professor, Communication and the Arts: Communications Processes)
  • Interviewed: 26 March 2013
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 1 hour, 3 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation Virginia Dell provides information on her husband, Jerry Dell who was a faculty member teaching photography. She describes his early life and first photography experiences; the creation of the photography courses at UWGB; his participation in national photography organizations; the structure of January Interim courses; community outreach efforts; changes in photography. The interview concludes with Ginny’s views of Jerry as a photographer and his belief of Manifest Destiny. The interview briefly touches on his founding of the Midwest Invitational meetings.

Virginia Dell

  • At UWGB: 1973-2006 (Editor, Office of Marketing and University Communications)
  • Interviewed: 24 January 2013
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 1 hour, 22 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation Virginia Dell discusses her personal background and career right after college; coming to UWGB and her first impressions of the campus and community; her duties as Assistant Director of Publications; a brief history of the News Services/ Publications Department and its changing role; her public relations duties during her later tenure on campus; striking moments in UWGB history (e.g. Lucy Stone Center) and her memories of several faculty members.

E

Marge Engelman

  • At UWGB: Instructor (1965-1972); Director of Adult Education (1972-1975); Director of Outreach (1975-1985)
  • Interviewed: 27 August 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Marge Engelman began her career with the UW System in 1965 when she started teaching courses at the UW Fox Valley Center. She went on to teach at the UW Green Bay Center and was hired by Chancellor Weidner to work at the new UW-Green Bay. Marge had a key role in interior design of the first campus buildings (think purple shag carpet and burnt orange upholstery).

    She was the first director of the adult education program (1972) – a first of its kind venture in the UW System. In this role, Marge developed off-site learning centers for delivery of credit and non-credit courses. Sites included the Port Plaza Mall and the Wisconsin State Reformatory.

    In 1975, Marge was named the Director of Outreach and was part of the Chancellor’s new administrative unit called the Office of Academic Affairs. She was one of the first women administrators at UW-Green Bay and was a strong proponent of programming encouraging women to explore and reach their potentials.

    Marge was an early and strong supporter (along with student Lorna Aaronson) of development of the Children’s Center on campus and speaks highly about Dorothy Parsons, the innovative first director of the Children’s Center. Marge, ever interested in expanding adult access to education, worked to change policy so that community members could audit credit courses at the University (when seats were available) an opportunity extended to all campuses in the UW System.

    She admits her most challenging role was that as Director of Affirmative Action.

    Her most fun and creative moment was likely her art piece submitted for a Neville Museum art show in 1972 titled THE LAND OF THE FREED UP WOMAN. Based on the format of an American flag, it included women’s bras for the flag’s white stripes and symbols of birth control pills for the flag’s stars. This iconic art piece is now in the collection of the Wisconsin State Historical Society.

F

Gary Fewless

  • At UWGB: 1981-Present (Herbarium Curator, Cofrin Arboretum Botanist)
  • Interviewed: 3 December 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 16 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Gary Fewless graduated from UW-Green Bay and is currently the Herbarium Curator for UW-Green Bay. The focus of this conversation is on Gary’s involvement with the development of the natural areas in the Cofrin Arboretum and current work and research he is doing in the Arboretum. Gary also discusses how the Arboretum is being used for classroom work. He describes his work as Curator of the Herbarium and provides some explanation on how plants are collected and preserved.

Ken Fleurant

  • At UWGB: 1970-2006 (Professor, Humanistic Studies: Literature and Language)
  • Interviewed: 16 May 2011
  • Interviewer: Lynn Walter
  • Length: 1 hour, 8 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation Ken Fleurant discusses reasons for coming to UWGB; initial impressions of the campus; “difficult days” regarding tenure and completion of PhD as well as structure and staffing of foreign language department; first impressions of academic plan; early teaching activities; autobiographical information; memorabilia for archives; experience with Liberal Education Seminars; changes in his position over time; curriculum changes; impressions of leadership of university and students; and aspects of the original academic plan/vision that remain.

Jack Frisch

  • At UWGB: 1960’s-1992 (Professor, Communication and the Arts: Theater)
  • Interviewed: 4 November 2011
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 30 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Jack was instrumental in development of UW-Green Bay’s theater program. This video conversation focuses on a unique course developed by Professor Frisch titled, “Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communications,” which incorporated games into the curriculum. He also discusses the NEW GAMES festival he coordinated in September, 1978. The earth ball, lapsit and the teepee were part of this event.

G

Bruce Grimes

  • At UWGB: Associate Professor of Communication and the Arts (1970-1982); Athletics Director (1973-1982)
  • Interviewed: 8 March 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 23 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Professor Bruce Grimes joined the UWGB Visual Arts faculty in 1970 to teach ceramics. He became Chair of the Visual Arts option, then Interim Chair of the College of Arts and Communications and finally UWGB Athletic Director.

    Bruce talks about teaching ceramics in the old warehouse (not on Campus) and former students who are now making a living doing art work.

    He talks extensively about building an NCAA Division I program (UWGB became Division I in 1981) and building athletic programs to include women’s athletic teams as a result of Title IX.

    Bruce describes the challenges athletic budgets faced. He explains the role of the Student Activities Committee and legislative awards which gave in-state tuition waivers for out of state athletes.

    He explains how a ceramicist came to be an Athletic Director as well as the book he wrote in 1978, The Money Game– Funding Collegiate Athletics. Bruce shares thoughts about the basketball coaches, Dave Buss and Carol Hammerle.

    Bruce discusses the mascot name change to Fighting Phoenix. He describes the awards given for Outstanding Spectator, Honorary Letter Winner, Outstanding Student Athlete given at the annual Sports Banquet.

    Bruce also talks about the impact Chancellor Weidner had on developing a Division I program and what he termed his “Chancellor walks” when the Chancellor introduced him to the opportunities of the Campus encouraging Bruce to look at things in a different light.

    Bruce left UWGB in 1982 to take on the new challenge of developing an athletic program at Northern Florida.

H

Don Harden

  • At UWGB: Assistant Chancellor for Student Affairs (1970-1980); Associate Chancellor including oversight of Instructional Services, Athletics, Student Services, Founders Association, fundraising, and University Relations (1980-1994)
  • Interviewed: 4 November 2010 I
  • Interviewer: Betty Baer
  • Length: 1 hour, 15 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation Don Harden provides brief biographical information and discusses his positions prior to UWGB. He describes his transition to UWGB and changes in his roles; initial impressions of UWGB; Chancellor Weidner’s leadership style; the “Saturday Night Massacre”; Werner Prange anecdote; faculty’s involvement with curriculum; Professional Studies vs. Arts and Science departments; budget matters; and student housing.

    Harden further elaborates on his community role while at UWGB and later years. He goes on to describe the community response to the academic plan and involvement of influential community members such as Jake Rose. Additional topics addressed by Harden include the competition between communities of Green Bay and Appleton for UWGB; fundraising efforts in community and results; methods used at UWGB to support community involvement; and a summary of first ten years of leadership.

Bud Harris

  • At UWGB: 1969-1999 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology
  • Interviewed: 8 June 2012
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 1 hour, 20 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation Bud Harris discusses his early life and education. He goes on to describe Liberal Education Seminars and courses he taught. He discusses the Zero Population Growth and Reproduction and the Family course which was controversial within the community. He further describes the transition from Fox Valley Center to UW Green Bay four year campus; linking of “Ecosystem Analysis” and “Environmental Control” departments and the complicated organization; teaching experiences; his role in the graduate program; interdisciplinary; serving as the chair of the Sea Grant Advisory Committee; and the new graduate program in Ecological Economics. The interview concludes with Harris’ reflection on the current state of affairs at UWGB.

Carol Hammerle

  • At UWGB: Physical Education instructor, Cheerleading Coach (1973- 1976); UWGB Phoenix Women’s Head Basketball Coach (1973-1998)
  • Interviewed: 14 August 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 44 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Title IX had just been enacted when Carol Hammerle joined the athletic department in 1973. Her position was described as 2/3 physical education teacher, 1/3 intramurals and as an extra – intercollegiate athletics and cheerleading coach. She started numerous pro- grams in the phy ed department – slimnastics, swimnastics, backpacking, orienteering, tennis, biking.

    Carol’s first attempt at intercollegiate athletics was to start a women’s field hockey team. This was unsuccessful.

    She then turned her attention to starting a women’s basketball program. This interview covers the development of that program over the twenty-five years Carol was the head coach from the first year (1973) when the team went 3-9 (of the thirteen players on the team, only 4 had played organized basketball before) to the first year in NCAA (late 1980s) when the team went 24-3.

    The women’s basketball program was originally in the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW), became a member of the Wisconsin Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WWIAC), moved on to the National Association for Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and eventually joined the NCAA.

    Carol talks about several turning points in the program – the ability to offer scholarships in the late 1970s, their first packed house for an ESPN midnight game against University of Detroit and the invaluable support of the Cage Club (the women’s basketball booster club eventually renamed the Fastbreak Club).

    Carol always wanted the best for her players and viewed intercollegiate athletics as a “playground for learning about life.”

Elmer Havens

  • Interviewed: 5 August 2009
  • Interviewer: Jerry Rodesch
  • Length: 49 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Partial interview with Elmer Havens. Havens discusses the academic plan for the University; the interdisciplinary aspects of the curriculum; community involvement in the University; the community’s perception of Chancellor Weidner; personality conflicts among the faculty members; and community reports about obscenity in the University, including the magazine The Big Yellow Bust. Many of his recollections involve the College of Creative Communications.

George O'Hearn

  • Interviewed: 28 January 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 7 minutes
  • Abstract:

    George O’Hearn is a retired UW-Green Bay professor who first joined the University in 1968. George was one of the primary architects of the UWGB Education program.

    A considerable part of the interview is devoted to George’s work in developing UWGB’s education program. He emphasizes the importance of developing strong working relations with the State Department of Public Instruction; local school districts; and faculty in all disciplines at UWGB. He talks about the values of the Liberal Education Seminars and his experience leading student groups to London for the January interim period. He was awarded a grant to bring local educators to campus for summer studies. He was also a moving force behind development of the Science Forum which brought local secondary science educators together on a regular basis for presentations and opportunities to share experiences.

Phil & Betsy Hendrickson

  • At UWGB: University Friends. Betsy was a student at UW-Green Bay and worked on campus as a specialist in the Wisconsin Assessment Center (1977-1985)
  • Interviewed: 29 November 2010
  • Interviewer: Betty Baer
  • Length: 57 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation, Betsy and Phil Hendrickson discuss how they were involved at UWGB; Ed Weidner; site location and the role of Rudy Small in getting the Shorewood site approved; establishment of Phuture Phoenix; and their donations to the University as well as their fundraising efforts.

Walter Herrscher

  • At UWGB: 1962-1964 Green Bay Center; 1964-2001 UWGB (Professor, Humanistic Studies: Literature and Language)
  • Interviewed: 22 January 2013 and 17 June 2013 
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 55 minutes (Jan 22) and 53 minutes (June 17)
  • Abstract:

    In these interviews, Walter Herrscher discusses his early life; the Green Bay Center; transition to UWGB as a four year campus; the Academic Plan; Liberal Education Seminars; and early teaching at UWGB.

    Walter describes the various committees he served on, including being Chair of the ROTC Committee in the 1970s; chair of the University Committee; and the committee for the First Earth Day observance.

K

June Kellogg

  • At UWGB: 1968-1988 (Program Assistant in various departments)
  • Interviewed: 16 January 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 68 minutes
  • Abstract:

    June Kellogg was hired by Dean Fred Sargent (the first Dean of the College of Environmental Science) in 1968 as a technical assistant administering a large grant. June talks about her job du- ties in those first days and later years; her experiences working with many early faculty; and host- ing three sisters from Thailand who attended UW Green Bay. June also provides insight into life in Green Bay in the 1920s-1940s while reminiscing about her early childhood growing up on Green Bay’s west side and early work experiences.

Halvor and Marit Kolshus

  • At UWGB: 1969-1977 (Professor, Modernization Processes; Associate Dean of Colleges, 1974-1975)
  • Interviewed: 6 September 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 8 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Halvor Kolshus was born and raised on a farm in Norway. He was doing research for his doctorate in agricultural economics (from University of Kentucky) in Thailand when he was recruited to join the UWGB’s Modernization Processes concentration with an option in economics (he never had a formal interview for the position).

    He was attracted to UWGB because of its interdisciplinary focus and the opportunity to develop new courses. Halvor talks about living in the Green Bay community and the early years at UWGB. He and his wife Marit remember inviting UWGB students to their farm to experience rural life. Halvor recalls his participation in the student organized march to City Hall protesting the Vietnam War.

    Halvor served as chair of Modernization Processes for two years and one year as an Associate Dean before taking a leave of absence and eventually resigning his position to pursue consulting opportunities with international organizations including the United Nations. During this time, he returned to Norway to run the family farm for several years. Halvor recalls some of his long term consulting assignments that have taken him and his family to several countries including Laos and Turkey.

L

Bill Laatsch

  • At UWGB: 1966-2009 (Professor, Geography; Interim Provost, 2008-2010)
  • Interviewed: 8 December 2010
  • Interviewer: Lynn Walter
  • Length: 50 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation Bill Laatsch discusses his early life; his reasons for coming to UWGB; interview process; initial impression of the curriculum and aspects of first curriculum still in existence; development of new courses; curriculum changes; roles in governance; outreach activities; teaching in other programs; and initial impressions of leaders.

Don Larmouth

  • At UWGB: 1970-2000 (Professor, Communication and the Arts: Communication Processes; Dean of Arts, Sciences, and Graduate Programs)
  • Interviewed: 22 February 2012
  • Interviewer: Virginia Dell
  • Length: 1 hour, 40 Minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this interview, Don Larmouth discusses his biographical information and early career; various roles and responsibilities at UW-Green Bay; courses taught; reasons for coming to UW Green Bay and first impressions; the Natural and Applied Sciences program; relationship between science and humanities faculty; describes Aesthetics Awareness Program; thoughts on UW-Green Bay and the “grand idea”; programs within the College of Creative Communication; organizational structure of academics; Division I Athletics; and his participation in the Graduate Faculty Council.

Lou Lecalsey

  • At UWGB: 1968-1970 (UWGB Men’s Soccer Head Coach)
  • Interviewed: 10 September 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 4 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Lou LeCalsey was working for Scott Paper and coaching the UW-Marinette Center Men’s Soccer Team when he was recruited by Chancellor Ed Weidner to be the first UWGB Men’s Soccer head coach in 1969. Granted a two year leave from Scott Paper, Lou accepted the head coaching position while simultaneously working on his MBA at UW-Oshkosh.

    In this interview Lou talks about his job interview with Vince Lombardi and fundraising, (his UWGB budget for men’s soccer was $0). He describes recruiting players from international programs, junior college programs and elite East coast soccer leagues. He recalls the recruiting support he received from Bart Starr. Bart would meet prospective recruits at the airport and entertain them in his home while talking up the wonderful opportunity this new program would provide.

    This interview includes reminisces about some early games played. The goal of the program was to make an immediate impact and this was accomplished when the Phoenix soccer team was invited to participate in the NAIA tournament at the end of its second season– an invitation that was declined for lack of funding to cover expenses.

    Lou talks about his decision to resign the program at this point - he had completed his MBA and his two year leave from Scott Paper had ended. He returned to Scott Paper eventually becoming a senior vice president.

    Lou continues to be a strong UWGB supporter currently serving as Chair of the UW -Green Bay Founder’s Association Board of Directors and the Chancellor’s Council of Trustees.

Marie Lemerond

  • At UWGB: 1970-2009 (Administrative Assistant in various departments)
  • Interviewed: 19 June 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 58 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Marie (Peterson) (Stephenson) Lemerond began her career at UWGB in 1970 when she was hired to work in the Registrar’s office—then located at Deckner Avenue.

    In this interview, Marie talks about the registration process and how it evolved. She describes the campus, staff and students; the camaraderie shared with staff in the Registrar’s office as well as the changes in each over time.

    Marie also recounts the events surrounding the State employee strike in the1970s--- Marie was vice-president of the local state employee union at the time.

    Marie retired in 2009 from the Human Biology department where she was a University associate. She later returned to campus to work as an LTE in the Business and Finance office for several years.

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Gary Mach

  • At UWGB: 1968-2000 (Supervisor, Technical Support Services)
  • Interviewed: 29 May 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Gary Mach had an opportunity to work with many campus departments and people during his thirty- one year career as a broadcast and communication engineer at UWGB. Hired by Werner Prange in 1968, Gary’s first directive was to build a TV studio with limited funds and donated equipment. Gary and his small crew recorded some of the first distance learning courses offered by UWGB. These courses were sent live to students sitting in classrooms at UW-Marinette.

    He recounts the first campus computer which was initially installed at Discount U—The Schmidt Building that was used in the early days of the University when the Shorewood site buildings were being developed. Of note—that first computer had a 32K core memory.

    Gary was involved with the Campus radio station and the birth of WI Public Television (Channel 38) at UWGB. He also did the video taping of many early athletic events. He was personally responsible for setting up communication networks in all campus buildings completed before 1999. In Gary’s own words describing the early days at UWGB, “We didn’t know what we couldn’t do.”

James Madigan

  • At UWGB: University Friend
  • Interviewed: 16 February 2011
  • Interviewer: Betty Baer
  • Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this interview, James Madigan discusses how he first became involved with UW-Green Bay; his professional life; the development of the Founder’s Club; his impressions and thoughts of UWGB and its curriculum; and community involvement in the campus.

Marilyn McCarey

  • At UWGB: Student (1969); Ticket Director, Special Events Coordinator, Kress Center (1971-2011)
  • Interviewed: 24 August 2011
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 55 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this conversation with Marilyn McCarey, she discusses her personal background; her time at UW-Green Bay as a student and as a staff member; the music program, including marching band; the Shorewood Club; the move from the Deckner Ave campus to the current location; and her impressions as a student including discussions of athletics (football, soccer, mascot); ethnic diversity on campus; classes; Liberal Education Seminars; homecoming; social life and campus activities; and registration.

Frank Madzarevic

  • At UWGB: Student (1972-1976); Director of Sports Center (1976-2001)
  • Interviewed: 5 June 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 2 hours, 12 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Frank Madzarevic graduated from UWGB in 1976. He was then hired as the first Director of the Sports Center when it opened in 1976. Frank served in a variety of roles throughout his 35 years as a UWGB staff member – all associated with UWGB athletics and recreational activities.

    In this interview Frank talks about both his student days and his many years as a staff member. Attracted by a new and different campus with an interdisciplinary focus, Frank reminisces about the early campus environment; shuttling between the Shorewood and Deckner sites on the propane buses; courses that applied what was learned in the classroom; and “Vomit Fest.”

    Frank was involved with numerous activities associated with UWGB athletics and recreational sports and he has stories to go along with many of these including: Noon ball (National Noon Ball Association); coaches he came to know; and fundraising efforts, particularly Bayfest and the Corn Maze.

    He also shares the experiences he had riding in a blimp; driving a Zamboni; and escorting Muhammad Ali at a NCAA game in Indianapolis.

Father Richard Mauthe

  • At UWGB: 1966-1996 Director of Newman Center (Ecumenical Center)
  • Interviewed: 17 October 2012
  • Interviewer: Lee and Helen Schwartz
  • Length: 50 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Father Richard Mauthe has been affiliated with the Newman Center and later the Ecumenical Center on the UW-Green Bay Campus for over fifty years. Father talks about his initial assignment as Chaplain at the then Newman Center and the transition of the two-year Green Bay Center to a four-year campus.

    Father discusses the name change from the Newman Center to the Ecumenical Center (name has recently changed to the Mauthe Center in honor of his work) and the role it played in University life. He also reflects on the students he worked with throughout the years.

Joe Moran, Michael Morgan, Jim Wiersma

  • At UWGB: Moran: 1969-2001 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Earth Sciences); Morgan: 1968 -2005 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology); Wiersma: 1968-1997 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Chemistry)
  • Interviewed: 12 December
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Abstract:

    Retired UWGB Professors Michael Morgan, Joseph Moran and James Wiersma developed the pioneering course Introduction to Environmental Science and an accompanying text book.

    In this conversation they discuss the themes of UWGB’s first academic plan – problem-oriented education with an interdisciplinary environmental focus. They explain how their gateway course included those themes and the motivation for developing their textbook – Introduction to Environmental Science - as well as student response to the course. They also discuss the process for developing this textbook- the first published by UWGB faculty – which was adopted by universities and colleges throughout the nation.

Joe Moran

  • At UWGB: 1969-2001 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Earth Science)
  • Interviewed: 18 September 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 58 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Joe Moran was completing a doctorate at UW-Madison when recruited to join the faculty at UW-Green Bay in 1969. His interdisciplinary interests in geology and climate change were a good match with the early UWGB curriculum. Joe recalls the Greyhound bus ride to Green Bay for his job interview and his first day on the job.

    He provides his views on the somewhat confusing early terminology (concentrations and options) and Liberal Education Seminar program requirements and comments on the quality of the early UWGB students.

    Joe had the opportunity to develop several courses including one on glacial geology and was part of several interdisciplinary teaching efforts including the development of the Introduction to Environmental Science course.

    His research has focused on climate change and variability. One of his projects evaluated the weather observations collected in the 1820s at the earliest Green Bay area weather station- Fort Howard.

    Joe recalls his many years of service on the Faculty Senate. Joe also served as chair of the committee which was responsible for selection of Leo Buscaglia (also known as Dr. Love) as commencement speaker. Joe recalls Chancellor Weidner’s response to that selection. Joe considers himself extremely lucky to have had the opportunity to be a faculty member at UWGB.

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Jerry Olson

  • At UWGB: Director of Financial Aid (1968-1975) and Dean of Students (1975-1998)
  • Interviewed: 6 April 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 37 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Gerald Olson started working at UWGB in 1968 as the Director of Financial Aid. He served as Dean of Students from 1975 until his retirement in 1998. He was instrumental in developing Student Services and Student Life policies and program from the ground up. He was especially appreciative of the professionalism of the area directors who reported to him. These areas included admissions, financial aid, housing, health services, career placement, counseling and student life programs.

    His primary focus was always the student and the desire to provide the best experience for them while at UWGB. He expressed great pride in early student leaders who developed award winning student governance programs. Jerry was the first person to receive the Founder’s Association Award for Academic Support in 1975.

David Outcalt

  • At UWGB: Chancellor (1986-1993); Philip J and Elizabeth B. Hendrickson Professor of Business (1994-1998)
  • Interviewed: 18 October 2011
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 1 hour, 2 minutes
  • Abstract:

    David Outcalt opens this interview by describing his career prior to his time at UWGB and reflects that he had heard about UW Green Bay before he even applied for the Chancellor position. He de- scribes the search and screen process which led to his selection as UWGB Chancellor and his initial impressions of the campus and the community.

    Outcalt discusses his first actions which included visiting community members and pushing for changes in terminology. He identifies and describes challenges he had to face such as remodeling buildings and rearranging offices to create more student space; Children’s Center; upgrading athletic facilities; and equality for women’s athletics.

    He discusses academic planning and reorganization; the planning and building of the Weidner Center; and campus funding difficulties.

    He ends the interview by talking about playing the violin in musical groups since his retirement, including a stint in a UWGB production of Fiddler on the Roof.

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Carol Pollis

  • At UWGB: Professor, Social Change and Development (1969-2000); Director of Individualized Learning Programs and University Without Walls (1972-1975); Administrator positions (1998- 2002)
  • Interviewed: 30 August 2013
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 55 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Carol begins the interview by describing the various courses she taught on topics such as Sex and Society and Family and Society as well as the community reaction to these courses. She further discusses the Green Bay gay culture (past and current) as well as the community’s reactions to sex education/family studies (past and current). Carol describes the tension and political issues surrounding family studies courses at UWGB. She describes in detail Liberal Education Seminars, including the successes and particular students.

    Carol describes in detail the University Without Walls initiative and program she directed. University Without Walls was in many ways a predecessor to the Extended Degree program.

    The conversation moves to the creation of the Women’s Studies program at UWGB. Carol touches upon the climate for women at UWGB.

    The interview concludes with Carol discussing her administrative career and her experiences working for three Chancellors (Weidner, Outcalt, Perkins).

Carol Pollis

  • At UWGB:
  • Interviewed: 11 March 2011
  • Interviewer: Lynn Walter
  • Length: 58 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this interview, Carol Pollis discusses her autobiographical information and why she chose to come to UWGB. She outlines her change of positions over time. Carol describes her initial impressions of university leadership; and faculty and student perceptions of curriculum. She touches upon factors that shaped the curriculum; changes in the curriculum; and the academic plan elements present in current curriculum.

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Les Raduenz

  • At UWGB: 1971-2006 (Director of Facilities Management)
  • Interviewed: 22 August 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 35 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this interview, Les Raduenz, retired director of Facilities Management, discusses a set of maps of the campus. These maps include the master plans for the campus and a surveyor’s map, which includes information about vegetation, topography and other features of the proposed campus site. Another map discussed shows landscaping plans.

    Raduenz describes his involvement in the landscape design and Keith White’s concept of the Arboretum. Raduenz also discusses how, because of the open nature of the proposed building site, they were able to design the layout of the campus based upon a central building (the Library), rather than having the building oriented on a grid pattern like Madison or Milwaukee campuses.

Les Raduenz and Keith White

  • At UWGB: Raduenz: 1971-2006 (Director of Facilities Management); White: 1968-1989 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology)
  • Interviewed: 17 October 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 2 hours, 2 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Keith White is a retired UW-Green Bay faculty member. Les Raduenz, now retired, was Director of Facilities Management at UW-Green Bay. The focus of this conversation is the development of the Cofrin Arboretum. Topics discussed include: original vision for the Arboretum (natural areas vs. botanical/ornamental gardens); role of faculty Natural Areas Committee (Professor White was the chair); importance of Cofrin Family support in development of the Arboretum; physical process required to develop the Arboretum (who did the planting, etc.); and the establishment of prairies. Both conclude that development of the Arboretum in the 70s, 80s, and 90s was a unique opportunity that could not be replicated today.

Jack & Ginny Riopelle

  • At UWGB: 1969-Present. University Friend.
  • Interviewed: 23 May 2011
  • Interviewer: Betty L. Baer
  • Length: 33 minutes
  • Abstract:

    The interview covers Ginny’s experiences as a UWGB student in 1969. She conveys her impressions of the campus, the faculty, and courses as a student.

    Riopelle discusses her father’s (Rudy Small) role in establishing the present location of UWGB. She describes the initial community response to the University, including its curriculum and reputation. Riopelle provides perceptions of the interactions and reactions of UWGB Chancellors within the community. She describes the strong community involvement with funding for the Weidner and Kress Centers.

    Riopelle’s husband, Jack, discusses relationships between government and businesses.

    The interview concludes with comments about Founders Day, and graduate tracking—75% of graduates stay in the area.

Jerry Rodesch

  • At UWGB: 1971-2003 (Professor, Humanistic Studies: History)
  • Interviewed: 1 hour, 8 minutes
  • Interviewer: Joan Thron
  • Length: 22 January 2013
  • Abstract:

    Interview subject matter includes discussion of faculty governance; faculty ex- change program; and American Documentary Theater Project.

    Jerry discusses being Chair of the search committee to find the second Chancellor. He addresses: the confidential search; community dissatisfaction with the search; and composition of the committee (faculty, staff and students, but no community members).

    The interview concludes with Jerry describing his UW System internship; time as the Secretary of the Faculty and Academic Staff; and reflections after being retired for ten years.

Mary Ann Rose

  • At UWGB: University Services Program Associate for Liberal Education Seminars (1969-1977); University Without Walls (1977-1978); and Counseling and Health (1978-2011)
  • Interviewed: 14 December 2010
  • Interviewer: Barbara McClure-Lukens
  • Length: 1 hour, 6 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Mary Ann Rose reflects on her time as a clerical support staff member at UW-Green Bay. The interview begins with Rose providing biographical information and how she chose to pursue a career at UW Green Bay.

    She describes in detail the Liberal Education Seminars, including the structure of the curriculum; the programs strengths and weaknesses; community resistance to the program; and the eventual termination of the program.

    She also discusses the clerical staff strike in the early 1970s; Eco-U; the change in status of clerical staff; student protests of the Vietnam War; the changing roles and perceptions of support staff; and changes in the campus since the early years of UWGB.

Chuck Rhyner & Ron Stieglitz

  • At UWGB: Rhyner: 1968-2001 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Physics); Stieglitz: 1976-2005 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Earth Sciences)
  • Interviewed: 12 November 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Abstract:

    Professor Chuck Rhyner became director of the UWGB graduate program in the 1970s. Professor Ron Stieglitz followed Professor Rhyner as the director of the UWGB graduate program. This short video begins a conversation on the challenges of establishing an interdisciplinary graduate pro- gram. Follow up audio interviews with Professor Rhyner and Professor Ron Stieglitz discussing the development of the graduate program in more detail are also available.

Chuck Rhyner

  • At UWGB:
  • Interviewed: 9 January 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 37 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Charles Rhyner is a retired UW-Green Bay physics professor. This conversation focuses on Professor Rhyner’s role in the early development of the UW-Green Bay graduate program when he was the program director. UWGB first offered a Masters in Environmental Arts and Science (MEAS) degree in the 1970s. This was an interdisciplinary graduate program arching over an interdisciplinary undergraduate curriculum. Professor Rhyner discusses some of the challenges in implementing this program and the decisions that had to be made in developing program criteria.

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Paul Sager

  • At UWGB: 1967-1999 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology)
  • Interviewed: 4 December 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 10 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Paul Sager joined the UWGB faculty in 1967. He coordinated extensive research projects on Green Bay studying the phytoplankton communities. The focus of this conversation was the development of the Cofrin Arboretum the Director of the Arboretum and his role astum for ten years starting in the 1980s. Paul talks about some of the highlights of the Arboretum, the two main purposes of the Arboretum (provide an outdoor laboratory for teaching and provide a place for community members to walk and enjoy this marvelous natural area); the importance of the Cofrin family’s support of the Arboretum; and significant accomplishments during his tenure as director.

    Paul also provides some details about non- contiguous natural areas under the management of UWGB.

Paul Sager

  • At UWGB: 1967-1999 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology)
  • Interviewed: 27 January 2011
  • Interviewer: Lynn Walter
  • Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Paul Sager joined the UWGB faculty in 1967. He coordinated extensive research projects on the Bay studying phytoplankton communities. In this interview, Sager discusses his reason for coming to UWGB; initial impressions of the UWGB curriculum; the change from themed “colleges” to concentrations; early university leadership; Sager’s role in university governance; and the dismantling of the Liberal Education Seminar program.

Sandy Servais & Ron Stieglitz

  • At UWGB: Servais: 1980-2005 (Program Assistant, Graduate Studies); Stieglitz: 1975-2005 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Earth Studies)
  • Interviewed: 1 May 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 38 minutes
  • Abstract:

    This interview focuses on the development of the graduate program from 1989 – 2005. Professor Stieglitz was appointed Associate Dean of the Graduate Program in 1989. At that time, the UWGB graduate program offered master degrees in several areas and was involved in cooperative programs with other UW campuses. In the cooperative programs students attended classes on the UWGB campus while the degree was granted by the cooperating institution.

    During this time, UWGB moved away from the model where all faculty were considered graduate faculty to a model where only some faculty were considered graduate faculty. In addition program coordinator positions went from appointed to elected positions. Both Sandy and Ron talk about budget challenges as well as students who were in the graduate program

Lee Schwartz & Ron Starkey

  • At UWGB: Schwartz: 1968-1996 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology); Starkey: 1969 -2005 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: chemistry)
  • Interviewed: 8 April 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 20 minutes
  • Abstract:

    This video focuses on January interim student experiences during international travels. Retired UW-Green Bay professors Ron Starkey and Lee Schwartz discuss their experiences leading student travel courses during the January interim. Professor Schwartz was co-leader on an international trip to Germany that focused on transportation issues. Professor Starkey traveled with students to London focusing on environmental issues. One of the highlights of the London trip was a visit to a sewerage treatment plant. Both talk about the benefits of an international travel experience for students.

Lee Schwartz

  • At UWGB: 1968-1996 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Biology)
  • Interviewed: 1 August 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour
  • Abstract:

    Leander (Lee) Schwartz was Acting Dean of the UW Fox Valley Center when it became a satellite campus of the new UW-Green Bay in 1968. He continued on as a UW-Green Bay faculty member when the satellite campuses separated from UWGB and became part of the UW-College System in 1972.

    Lee discusses the central and satellite campus model of the new UWGB and the challenges the satellite campuses faced in adapting the unique curriculum being developed. He shares his thoughts on interdiscplinarity and the Liberal Education Seminars; the move away from LES; faculty governance and changes he witnessed under three different chancellors.

Len Seidl

  • At UWGB: University Friend
  • Interviewed: 15 August 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 25 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Len Seidl is a retired real-estate developer who was responsible for putting together the Shore- wood Site proposal which became the site for the present UW-Green Bay. Len begins this conversation talking about his early life in Green Bay and why/when he eventually became a real-estate developer. He explains the not-so-simple process involved in developing the site proposal for the Shorewood site and goes on to discuss the challenging political process which ultimately led to the selection of the Shorewood Site for the new university.

Ron Starkey

  • At UWGB: 1969-2005 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Chemistry)
  • Interviewed: 11 April 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 52 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Ron Starkey joined the UWGB faculty in 1969 and retired in 2005. Ron’s primary focus in his 36 year career was teaching organic chemistry. His love of spending time in the classroom and lab with students is apparent in this interview.

    Ron developed and team taught several interdisciplinary courses including one on air pollution and another on ecology. For several summers, Ron taught a course titled Wilderness Ways, Survival of and Survival in Wilderness. This very popular course included a one week Boundary Water experience and counted to- ward Liberal Education Seminar credits.

    Ron also developed software to facilitate student access to computer simulations. Ron’s reminisces include several amusing anecdotes about his teaching methods.

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Mike Thron

  • At UWGB: 1968-1998 (Professor, Humanistic Studies: Literature and Language)
  • Interviewed: 9 December 2012
  • Interviewer: John Thron
  • Length: 59 minutes
  • Abstract:

    The interview begins with Mike providing autobiographical information He paints a vivid picture of his interview for a position at UWGB as well as impressions of campus and the curriculum. He discusses the academic structure in the beginning and defines some of the early terminology with examples.

    Mike describes the process of faculty members moving from the two year centers to the four year campus. He outlines how new courses were initiated. Thron provides an excellent description of team teaching and Liberal Education Seminars. He also describes the January Interim trips that he led with students. The interview concludes with Thron’s observations about faculty governance and its structure.

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Roger Vanderperren

  • At UWGB: 1968-1998 (Director of Media Resources)
  • Interviewed: 21 March 2012
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 12 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Roger retired from UW- Green Bay in 1998 after forty years of service. During the first half of his tenure he was the audio supervisor for the Center for Television Production. He retired as the Director of Media Resources.

    In this conversation, Roger talks about his career at UW-Green Bay. In the early years he provided audio visual support for Chancellor Weidner when he made off-campus presentations. Roger also provided technical support for other media presentations and projects. He discusses the challenges in obtaining and updating equipment within budget constraints and comments on the technical advances that came about throughout his career.

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Chuck Rhyner & Jim Wiersma

  • At UWGB: Rhyner: 1968-2001 (Professor Natural and Applied Science: Physics); Wiersma: 1967-1997 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Chemistry)
  • Interviewed: 14 November 2011
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 30 minutes
  • Abstract:

    Charles Rhyner and James Wiersma are retired UW-Green Bay faculty members. The focus of this video interview was a unique science curriculum they developed and implemented in the 1970s to complement the interdisciplinary, problem oriented, environmental focused academic plan. Professors Rhyner and Wiersma discuss both the benefits and challenges in teaching the combination chemistry-physics four semester sequence they developed. They also discuss reasons for the demise of this unique approach to teaching chemistry and physics.

Bob Wenger

  • At UWGB: 1969-1999 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Mathematics)
  • Interviewed: 25 April 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 1 hour, 38 minutes
  • Abstract:

    The focus of this audio recording is retired UWGB Professor Bob Wenger’s continuing association with China. The story begins in the mid-1980s when three Chinese geography professors decided to start an environmental program titled the Institute of the Environment at Beijing Normal University in China. They heard about a new and upcoming environmental. Program in Green Bay while attending an international conference in the UK. As a result they sent one of their graduate students to study at UWGB. The three professors also decided to visit a number of US university environmental programs including UWGB where their graduate student was studying under Professor Bob Wenger.

    Professor Wenger hosted the three professors and on the last day of their visit, he was invited to be a visiting professor at the Institute of the Environment in Beijing. Bob was a visiting professor at Beijing Normal for the 1987-88 academic year. This first visit was followed by seven additional trips back to China, the latest in 2011. Professor Wenger talks about his many experiences in China during this fascinating conversation including comments on Chinese students, government and environment both then and now.

Bob Wenger

  • AT UWGB: 1969-1999 (Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences: Mathematics)
  • Interviewed: 8 April 2013
  • Interviewer: Jane Rank
  • Length: 22 minutes
  • Abstract:

    This video focuses on UWGB’s China connection. Bob Wenger, a retired UWGB faculty person who did considerable research with applied mathematics, discusses when and why the China connection began. Bob has made several trips to China since the mid-1980s and comments on the changes he has observed in those visits. A follow up audio interview with Professor Wenger about the China connection is also available.

Marge Weidner

  • At UWGB: 1967-1987 (Administrative Assistant to the Chancellor)
  • Interviewed: 10 January 2012
  • Interviewer: John thron
  • Length: 58 minutes
  • Abstract:

    In this interview, Marge Weidner discusses her time as secretary to the Chancellor. Subject matters include her hiring experience and first impressions of the University; a description of the first administrative offices known as “The Farmhouse”; campus name and address; the academic plan; early relationships with the community and with students; UWGB Administration and Central Administration at UW System; the international connections of campus; and her favorite parts of the job.