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Sociology

What can you do with this minor?

Remember that UW-Green Bay only offers a minor in Sociology, and the career titles below will most likely need at least a Bachelors Degree with a Sociology major. However, you can still use the list to get a better idea of what opportunities are in this field and where the jobs are!

Undergraduate programs in sociology provide a strong liberal arts preparation for entry level positions throughout the business, social service, and government world. Employers look for people with the skills that an undergraduate education in sociology provides. Since its subject matter is intrinsically fascinating, sociology offers valuable preparation for careers in journalism, politics, public relations, business, or public administration--fields that involve investigative skills and working with diverse groups. Many students choose sociology because they see it as a broad liberal arts base for professions such as law, education, medicine, social work, and counseling. Sociology provides a rich fund of knowledge that directly pertains to each of these fields.

For more information about fields of study and specialty areas in sociology, see the section on Sociological Specialties at American Sociological Association website.

The following list represents some of the careers for sociology students:

business --in advertising, marketing and consumer research, insurance, real estate, personnel work, training, or sales; community work -- in fund-raising for social service organizations, nonprofits, child-care or community development agencies, or environmental groups; college settings --in admissions, alumni relations, or placement offices; corrections --in probation, parole, or other criminal justice work; government services --in federal, state, and local government jobs in such areas as transportation, housing, agriculture, and labor; health services --in family planning, substance abuse, rehabilitation counseling, health planning, hospital admissions, and insurance companies; publishing, journalism, and public relations --in writing, research, and editing; social services --in rehabilitation, case management, group work with youth or the elderly, recreation, or administration; teaching --in elementary and secondary schools, in conjunction with appropriate teacher certification.

Want to know more about the nature of the work, working conditions, earnings, training, and job outlook for sociologists? Check out the information at the website for the American Sociological Association.