FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

About the Program

1. Do I have to be an athlete to go for this M.S. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology (SEPP) Program? 
2. Do I need a psychology or sport-related major to apply to the SEPP Program? 
3. What kind of jobs do SEPP professionals do? 
4. Do the Packers have a sport psychologist? 
5. What kinds of internships do SEPP students do?
6. What does internship look like? 
7. What kind of research opportunities do SEPP students have? 
8. Why do athletes and performers work with sport and performance psychology consultants? Is it because they are “mentally weak?" 
9. How many years does it take to become a Certified Mental Performance Consultant (CMPC) or a sport psychologist? 
10. How can I decide between the applied and thesis tracks, or both?
11. Do I have to be a full-time student to complete this program? Can I do the program remotely?
12. How can I schedule a visit?
13. When is the application deadline?
Additional Questions?

1. Do I have to be an athlete to go for this M.S. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology (SEPP) Program? 

No, being an athlete is not a requirement for the Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology program, as we prepare for more careers than just those in athletics. It is important to bring a passion with career aspirations to work with people in various performance domains, including sport, music, business, and the military.

2. Do I need a psychology or sport-related major to apply to the SEPP Program? 

No, you are not required to have a psychology or sport-related degree, although it is important to have some experience applying psychology in your educational or work experiences, such as through coaching and volunteering. It is helpful to have some previous knowledge or experience relevant to our learning outcomes

3. What kind of jobs do SEPP professionals do? 

SEPP professionals can work with athletes, exercisers, and performers in various domains. These include sport, music, theater, business, fitness industry, the military, etc. Professionals can hold positions such as psychologists, mental performance consultants, coaches and coach educators, and so on. You can see more specific descriptions on the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) Career Center website.

4. Do the Packers have a sport psychologist? 

Yes! The Green Bay Packers hired Dr. Chris Carr as a part-time consultant in 2018 and offered him a full-time position as their Director of Performance Psychology and Team Behavioral Health Clinician in early 2020. Read the press release to learn more. 

5. What kinds of internships do SEPP students do? 

SEPP internships are completed through various community partners, including UWGB Division I Athletics, high schools, YMCA, and health care networks. Students are also welcome to develop their internships with approval by SEPP faculty. You can see more information about internships in our Student Handbook. 

6. What does internship look like? 


Internship consists of being on site 6-10 hours per week. Interns also attend 1 hour supervision meetings each week with their respected supervisor. All interns have required class time to gain ideas, feedback, and other tools from students and supervisors. Preparation for meetings, on site presentations, and individual sessions is expected. 

7. What kind of research opportunities do SEPP students have? 

In addition to theses, students can work with different faculty members on existing research projects, such as topics on sport coaching, motivation, mindfulness, self-compassion, performance anxiety, youth sport, and Exercise-is-Medicine. The Psychology Department has several research labs/teams that involve SEPP students. Students looking to design their own research project have the opportunity to do so with the approval and assistance of a willing faculty adviser. See some of our recent Student/Faculty Publications and Presentations.

8. Why do athletes and performers work with sport and performance psychology consultants? Is it because they are “mentally weak?" 

Athletes and performers work with sport and performance psychology consultants because they want to improve instead of being “weak.” Just like athletes need to do physical strength and conditioning to get stronger and faster, they also need mental strength and conditioning to become more focused and confident in order to achieve desired practice and competition outcomes. Athletes and performers may also be referred by coaches, athletics staff, or parents looking to help better their performance mentality and relationships (e.g., team chemistry). You can see some common psychological skills we teach on our Public Resources page.

9. How many years does it take to become a Certified Mental Performance Consultant (CMPC) or a sport psychologist? 

It may take anywhere from 3–4 years to become a CMPC. This includes the time it takes to finish a master’s program (such as ours) that provides students will all the necessary coursework and some mentored CMPC hours. Then, students will continue with the required hours (at least 400 total) of mentored consulting experience, and then pass an exam, to get certified as a CMPC.
 

Becoming a licensed sport psychologist will require completing a doctoral program in counseling/clinical psychology and fulfilling the licensure requirements, which vary from state to state and take at least 6 years. One main different difference between a sport psychologist and CMPC is that a sport psychologist works with clients on clinical and mental health issues beyond mental performance. You can see more information on the APA Div 47 website. 

10. How can I decide between the applied and thesis tracks, or both?


If you wish to work primarily as a consultant or practitioner, the applied track will likely be your best option. If you want to apply to a research-focused PhD program or work in academia conducting research and teaching to help expand the knowledge of the field, the thesis track may be the preferred choice. If you are looking to do a mixture of both, there is a potential to complete a dual track with faculty approval. Due to the internship and thesis workloads being heavier than other coursework, dual-track students may need more than the projected two years to complete the degree. The track option can be further discussed with the faculty after admission. See Student Handbook for details.

11. Do I have to be a full-time student to complete this program? Can I do the program remotely?


Applicants who commit to enroll full time (9 credits per semester plus a 3-credit summer course) will be considered first. Part-time students will be considered only if we still have spots available. Our program is almost completely in person, meaning that you will need to come to campus for classes throughout your studies.

12. How can I schedule a visit? 

In order to schedule a visit with us, contact graduate studies. Inform them you are interested in the Sport, Performance, and Exercise Psychology Program. They will work with your schedule to give you a tour, and talk with current faculty and students in the program 

13. When is the application deadline?


We have a priority deadline of February 1, meaning that we will consider applicants who have completed their applications (including two letters of recommendation) by then for interview and acceptance. We will consider applicants completing their application after that date and by August 17 only if we still have spots available. View the application process for more information. 

Additional Questions?

Chair of the M.S. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Program.

Telephone:(920) 465-5041
Email: chua@uwgb.edu