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What Happened When:
A UW-Green Bay Chronology

1963 » 1964 » 1965 » 1966 » 1967 » 1968 » 1969 » 1970 » 1971 » 1972 » 1973 » 1974 » 1975 » 1976 » 1977 » 1978 » 1979 » 1980 » 1981 » 1982 » 1983 » 1984 » 1985 » 1986 » 1987 » 1988 » 1989 » 1990 »


1963

APRIL
The Rev. Richard Mauthe,Newman Center chaplain serving the UW Green Bay Center community, tells members of the Downtown Lions Club that Green Bay needs a four-year college. He suggests that local citizens organize to support the idea.

In a Green Bay Press-Gazette story, Dean Theodore Savides of the UW Center shares his view that the freshman-sophomore campus will be overcrowded by 1965. A four-year college in Green Bay, he says, could draw about 5,000 students.

President Fred Harvey Harrington of the University of Wisconsin in Madison predicts in Press-Gazette story from Madison that four-year college facilities will eventually be built in the Green Bay-Fox Valley area.

MAY
Four Fox Valley members of the State Assembly introduce a resolution calling for serious consideration of a four-year campus in the Fox Valley. They act after Southeastern Wisconsin legislators have put forward a resolution on behalf of a four-year branch to serve the Racine-Kenosha area.

The Brown County Board of Supervisors forwards to the UW Board of Regents a resolution supporting creation of a degree-granting campus at Green Bay and reactivates the building committee that planned for development of the UW Green Bay Center.

SEPTEMBER
President Harrington, speaking in Green Bay, discloses that delegations of regents have surveyed Racine and Kenosha locations as possible sites for a third UW campus. If requested, similar groups could also be sent to such cities as Green Bay and Appleton, Harrington says.

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1964

JANUARY
A subcommittee of the state's Coordinating Council for Higher Education (CCHE) concludes that the Fox Valley area might be qualified to add a junior- and senior-level college program, and agrees to study the question of its control and operation.

APRIL
The regents approve the concept of two new UW campuses, ask CCHE for planning funds, and set opening dates: 1969 for a university in the Fox Valley, 1971 for one in the Racine-Kenosha area.

A Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce committee headed by R.E. (Rudy) Small begins to collect data on future higher education needs of seven counties in Northeastern Wisconsin.

JUNE
By unanimous vote, the CCHE recommends to Gov. John Reynolds that a four-year university be built in Northeastern Wisconsin by 1969.

AUGUST
Gov. Reynolds appoints three state officials to a site selection committee.

OCTOBER
Gov. Reynolds announces site selection criteria developed by the three-member state committee in consultation with Rudy Small's Northeastern Wisconsin Education Committee (NEWEC).

State officials, mayors of Northeastern Wisconsin cities and NEWEC members meet to review 11 sites, including six in Brown County.

NOVEMBER
Warren B. Knowles, a Republican, is elected governor.

The Press-Gazette urges action in an editorial: "There is no time to waste in the construction of the proposed new institutions of higher learning if we are to keep pace with the demand. ... The fact that there is a change in administration in Madison as the result of the recent election should not be permitted to delay work on this important project."

The state site committee announces selection of the "Larsen orchard site" on Green Bay's west side.

DECEMBER
The State Building Commission announces a 1965-67 budget request that includes $1.7 million to plan and acquire property for a Northeastern Wisconsin university.

At a meeting with the CCHE, Governor-elect Knowles argues against building two new universities, citing state budget problems. The $1.7 million appropriation is deleted from the building budget pending a decision on the project from the Legislature.

The Green Bay Chamber of Commerce and NEWEC launch an all-out campaign for public support of a new campus, through resolutions and other efforts directed to the Legislature, State Building Commission, CCHE and the governor-elect.

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1965

JANUARY
State Sen. Gerald Large introduces a $2.4 million appropriations bill for planning two new UW campuses.

MARCH
Three hundred citizens attend a Joint Legislative Education Committee hearing on the Large bill. Among those testifying in favor of a four-year university in the Fox Valley are UW President Harrington and Lt. Gov. Patrick Lucey; John Torinus, publisher of the Appleton Post-Crescent; Green Bay architect John Somerville; Attorney Meyer Cohen; and George Greenwood, a Kaukauna mortician.

JULY
The State Senate and Assembly pass a compromise bill providing $400,000 to plan for third- and fourth-year college classes in the Racine-Kenosha and Northeastern Wisconsin regions. The new campuses will be managed and directed by the University of Wisconsin, but UW plans for their development will be subject to approval or veto by the CCHE.

AUGUST
On recommendation of Cletus Vanderperren, the Brown County board votes unanimously to donate land for the proposed university, if necessary.

SEPTEMBER
Gov. Knowles signs a bill authorizing the addition of third- and fourth-year university instruction at sites yet to be determined in the two regions. He also appoints a new site selection committee. Its members promise to consider the report of the Reynolds committee, but make no commitment to endorse it.

The UW Green Bay Center announces final fall enrollment of 931, making it the largest two-year center in Wisconsin.

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1966

JANUARY
A recently organized city-county committee proposes six Brown County sites for a new university.

FEBRUARY
After touring proposed sites in Brown and Outagamie counties, the state committee recommends the "Shorewood site" fronting on the bay of Green Bay, subject to a stipulation that the land will be donated to the state. Immediate reaction is favorable except among Outagamie County legislators and officials and members of the Shorewood Country Club, which occupies part of the site.

MARCH
The Shorewood site wins approval of the CCHE and of the State Building Commission, by a 5-3 vote. Gov. Knowles votes with the majority.

The Brown County board votes to transfer the county farm portion of the Shorewood site to the state and purchase the remainder for conveyance to the state.

AUGUST
State officials set a fall 1969 target for opening of both new campuses. The State Building Commission agrees to hire campus planners.

SEPTEMBER
A first planning report for the Northeastern Wisconsin campus calls for construction of four buildings by fall 1969, at an estimated cost of $10 million. Initial enrollment projections are for 5,000 students by 1976, 10,000 by 1984, and 20,000 by 2000.

OCTOBER
A contract for site development is signed with Daverman and Associates of Milwaukee.

The UW regents appoint Dr. Edward W. Weidner as chancellor. During his first visit to Green Bay, Weidner promises that the new university will be "unique ... not a copy of any other university."

NOVEMBER
By action of the UW regents, the new institution is named the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

DECEMBER
The State Building Commission cuts its budget request for building two new campuses from $26.7 million to $12.9 million. Gov. Knowles votes in favor of the reduction.

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1967

JANUARY
Weidner announces plans for the UW-Green Bay academic structure, to be organized around four "theme" colleges.

Rep. William Rogers of Kaukauna and others introduce an Assembly bill to move the UW-Green Bay site from Shorewood to the Larsen orchard.

The Brown County board turns over title to Shorewood site land, except for the 135 acres of the Shorewood Country Club.

MARCH
Russell White is named assistant chancellor for business and financial services. He is Weidner's first appointment to the senior administration.

JUNE
Robert Maier is appointed assistant chancellor for instruction and research and professor of chemistry.

JULY
Weidner adds three more administrators: Frederick Sargent, dean of the College of Environmental Sciences; Raymond VIasin, director of planning and regional development; and Donald Makuen, director of student affairs. Richard Fontera, appointed associate professor of political science, becomes the first full-time faculty member.

Twenty-one professors and administrators from colleges and universities across the country attend a planning seminar to work on curricula for the College of Environmental Sciences and College of Community Sciences. The meeting inaugurates a series of consultations on the academic plan that will continue into November.

SEPTEMBER
As negotiations with the Shorewood Country Club fail, the Brown County board begins condemnation proceedings to acquire the remainder of the campus site.

New staff members are Rollin Posey, dean of the School of Business and Public Administration; W. Werner Prange, telecommunications specialist; and Michael Bruno, director of libraries.

OCTOBER
The Fort Howard Foundation awards a $12,000 grant for study of the role of telecommunications at UW-Green Bay.

The regents approve preliminary working drawings for campus buildings.

NOVEMBER
Weidner presides over groundbreaking for the College of Environmental Sciences complex, the University's first buildings.

The State Senate kills the Rogers bill to change the site. An Outagamie County lawsuit seeking a change of site remains in litigation.

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1968

JANUARY
The State Building Commission releases $6.1 million in construction funds. Bids are let for the first two buildings.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court throws out the Outagamie County challenge to the Shorewood site.

MARCH
The academic plan wins full approval from the CCHE, one month after endorsement by the Board of Regents.

UWGB becomes the official abbreviation for the campus name.

APRIL
The UW regents meet in Green Bay for the first time. A major discussion centers on dormitory hours for students.

JUNE
Regents approve a 4-1-4 calendar for the campus.

Michael Bruno resigns from the director of libraries post. Humanities librarian John Metz is named acting director.

JULY
UW-Green Bay takes control of two-year UW campuses at Manitowoc, Marinette and Menasha, as the outlying centers officially become "satellites" of the new degree-granting University.

Gerald Olson is named director of financial aid and student employment.

SEPTEMBER
Paul D. Davis begins his duties as special assistant to the chancellor and director of development.

OCTOBER
Russell White resigns. He is succeeded by Ronald Nettell, at UW-Green Bay since July as director of business services.

DECEMBER
Jerome Abraham leads student musicians from the four campuses in a band concert in the Green Bay
Center music-drama room.

Lou LeCalsey, soccer coach at the UW Center-Marinette County, becomes head soccer coach at UW-Green Bay.

The Brown County board votes to buy the Shorewood Country Club property for the condemnation price of $920,000.

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1969

JANUARY
David Buss comes from the West Virginia Institute of Technology to be head coach of men's basketball.

MARCH
Paul Mann is appointed professor and director of the theater arts program.

MAY
A Year One fund drive is launched with a goal of $150,000 in private gifts.

JUNE
Paul Davis organizes the Varsity Club to promote private fund raising for intercollegiate athletics.

JULY
Brown County transfers ownership of UW Green Bay Center property to the state.

AUGUST
Edward (Ted) Storey of the faculty is named dean of the College of Creative Communication, after serving since April as acting dean.

Robert Maier is promoted to vice chancellor, with authority to act for Chancellor Weidner in his absence.

Public Facilities Associates announces plans to build a $7 million student housing complex adjacent to the campus.

SEPTEMBER
Four years to the day after Gov. Knowles signed the bill creating UW-Green Bay, classes begin in two College of Environmental Sciences buildings on the new campus. Press-Gazette reporter Carolyn Stewart calls it "a day of chaos."

Season tickets for a package of eight soccer games and 10 basketball contests go on sale at $20.
Campus parking fees are established at $28 a year for full-time students and classified employees and $40 a year for faculty and professional staff.

The men's soccer team (still known as the Bay Badgers) defeats Colorado College 3-0 in its first intercollegiate game.

OCTOBER
At an open house on the campus and an evening convocation at the Brown County Arena, area residents join the University community to salute Year One of UW-Green Bay. The University's first faculty award is presented to William Anderson, a University of Minnesota political scientist who has been both professor and faculty colleague of Chancellor Weidner.
A noon pep rally, parade of decorated shuttle buses, greased pig-catching contest and dance in the Green Bay Center cafeteria highlight the University's first "homecoming" — at an institution as yet without alumni.

Art classes move to studios in a rented warehouse on Morrow Street.

NOVEMBER
The University applies for membership in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

Sharman Sturchio of Green Bay is elected president of a four-campus UW-Green Bay student government organization.

DECEMBER
The men's basketball team trounces Milton College, 99-70, in its first intercollegiate contest.

The new Jazz Ensemble and Pop Singers, directed by Lovell Ives, bow in a concert at the Deckner Avenue campus. The 70-piece UW-Green Bay Concert Band and 40-voice Concert Choir present their first public performance at Washington Junior High School. Robert Bauer and Ives, faculty members since July, are conductors.

William King, curator of art, installs "environmental images"—giant black-and-white photo murals—at 21 locations on campus. The photos offer contrasting scenes of natural beauty and environmental degradation.

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1970

JANUARY
The University welcomes academics and agency officials to its first national conference, a symposium on "Population Growth: Crisis or Challenge?"

Ground is broken for the second major construction project: a $6.4 million Library-Learning Center.

FEBRUARY
Ground is broken for the Bay Apartments. The complex of nine two-story buildings will be owned and operated by the builder, Public Facilities Associates, a division of Inland Steel Development Corporation.

The men's basketball team winds up its first season with a 16-8 record.

UW-Green Bay is accepted into membership in the Union of Experimenting Colleges and Universities.

APRIL
The first nationwide Earth Day draws 3,000 to the Brown County Arena. UW-Green Bay students and faculty take a major role in planning and producing the local celebration.

Assistant Chancellor Makuen resigns, citing personal reasons.

Green Bay Packers quarterback Bart Starr speaks at the first UW-Green Bay Sports Night, sponsored by the Varsity Club to honor men's intercollegiate athletics teams. Rick Whitt of WNFL Radio is emcee, and the campus Jazz Ensemble entertains at the event, attended by 150 fans.

MAY
Dean Storey announces plans to leave UW-Green Bay for a post at The Pennsylvania State University, effective Aug. 1.

Five hundred UW-Green Bay and St. Norbert College students are joined by Mayor Donald Tilleman in a march to protest the killing of four Kent State University students by members of the Ohio National Guard. The UWGB contingent is led by Bob Jeffcott, a member of the Green Bay End the War Committee. Students also schedule a campus day of mourning for the Kent State victims.

By student vote, the Phoenix becomes the mascot and official name of UW-Green Bay athletic teams.

The University announces that tuition and fees for 1970-71 will be $225 a semester.

JUNE
Threatening weather drives the University's first commencement indoors. Gov. Knowles, UW President Harrington and writer Max Lerner address the 78 graduates during ceremonies in the gymnasium of the Deckner Avenue building.

Soccer Coach LeCalsey complains to the Green Bay park board that Canada geese who make their home in Bay Beach Park are providing multiple hazards on his team's practice field. Board members contend, in response, that soccer play is frightening the geese and interfering with their feeding habits.

Chosen from 60 applicants as the first nine resource students for the Bay Apartments—one to each building—are Mary Ann Renn, Keith Pamperin, Thomas Loomer, Robert Laux, Barbara Polich, Nancy McNulty, Patrick Madden, Robert Mande and Robert Klimoski. Their duties will include informal counseling and trouble shooting for the student residents.

JULY
The Alumni Association is organized and Kenneth Hogg elected its first president.

A streamlined UW-Green Bay administrative structure replaces four academic deans with "Superdean" John Beaton.

SEPTEMBER
Donald F. Harden joins the administration as assistant chancellor for student services and associate professor of community sciences.

Fall enrollment at Green Bay tops 2,900, more than double the number reported in 1968. Students aged 25 or older make up 12 percent of the total.

OCTOBER
Arthur E. (Gene) Spurlock succeeds Ronald Nettell as director of business and finance services.

Ruth Hartley and Loulse Witherell of the faculty join Marge Engelman, assistant for returning adults, to organize Women for Equal Opportunity. The group seeks to work within campus structures to improve the status of women employees.

The Johnson Foundation of Racine awards a $41,350 grant to UW-Green Bay to develop an environmental studies curriculum for students in kindergarten through high school. George O'Hearn of the education faculty is project coordinator.

H.J. (Jack) Day, professor and chairman of environmental control, accepts an invitation to serve on Green Bay's Metropolitan Sewerage Commission.

NOVEMBER
The Big Yellow Bust, a student literary magazine, is "busted" after the first issue and state funding withdrawn on orders of Chancellor Weidner. As a student publication, the magazine must be supported by student funds, Weidner says.

Patrick Lucey, a Democrat, is elected governor.

A grocery cooperative opens for business at the Bay Apartments.

Professor Robert Bauer directs the UW-Green Bay Marching Band in its debut performance during a Green Bay Packers-Chicago Bears game at Lambeau Field.

Trinidad Chavez organizes the Green Bay Community Chorus.
Five weeks after a 2-0 homecoming victory over the Air Force soccer team before 1,500 fans, Phoenix Coach Lou LeCalsey resigns. He cites lack of support by the University administration, which has turned down a bid to the NAIA post-season tournament because of the costs involved.

DECEMBER
John Weaver, new president of the UW System, pays his first visit to the University. Each four-year campus should develop its unique program, he says: "The differences add strength and should be promoted."

Thirty-eight seniors are candidates for graduation at the first winter commencement.

Trinidad Chavez makes his first public appearance as director of the Concert Choir.

The Big Yellow Bust resurfaces, financed by students and sold for 50 cents a copy.

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1971

JANUARY
Drummer Joe Morello and trombonist Urbie Green are guest artists at the University's first Jazz Fest, offering clinic sessions and performances for high school jazz ensembles.

The student employment office reports that 200 collegians are on a waiting list for part-time jobs.

The Peninsula Center Sanctuary, a 160-acre tract in Door County, is presented to the University of Wisconsin by Judson Fuller as a memorial to his late wife, Jessie. UW-Green Bay will serve as caretaker for the property.

FEBRUARY
In a budget message to the Wisconsin Legislature, Gov. Lucey proposes merger of the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin State University systems.

Phoenix basketball star Ray Willis scores 45 points in a 111-59 victory over UW-Parkside.

A student health service hangs out its shingle on the fourth floor of the Laboratory Sciences Building. Registered nurses Beatrice Weidner and Chris Arrowsmith will be on duty from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays until Sept. 1, when full-time service begins.

John Fischer, writing in Harper's, labels UW-Green Bay "Survival U."

The student organization ATTAWAC (attitude, awareness, action on the environment) organizes a glass recycling campaign, installing bottle collection bins near the campus bus stop.

MARCH
The UW-Green Bay Jazz Ensemble under Lovell Ives wins second place in the Midwest Collegiate Jazz Festival at WSU-Eau Claire. Peter Polzak captures the outstanding jazz pianist trophy.

Students celebrate the grand opening of a coffeehouse in the basement of Building 107 of the apartment complex. It's named Carley's Place after David Carley, developer of the Bay Apartments.

Seven accounting students supervised by Karl Zehms open a free income tax clinic in the Green Bay Center conference room. Before the filing deadline they prepare tax returns for 50 low-income clients and answer questions for 50 more.

APRIL
The CCHE approves construction funds for the College of Creative Communication, College of Community Sciences, a student union and a building for physical education and sports. Within a week the sports center is deleted from the funding package. After Gov. Lucey tours the UW Center gym, he approves planning funds for a sports facility on the new campus.

MAY
Marge Engelman is named the first adviser to the chancellor on the status of women at UW-Green Bay. The Green Bay campus is the third public university in the state to create such a post.

Richard Fontera resigns to become dean of the faculty at Southeastern Massachusetts University. Raymond Viasin leaves to head the resource development department at Michigan State University.

Performing in the auditorium of the Environmental Sciences Building, pianists Julia Steinbach and Tim Gmeiner present compositions by Beethoven, Chopin, Brahms, Rachmaninoff, Debussy and Poulenc in the University's first student recital.

Susan Howard, graduating from the growth and development program, becomes the first student to maintain a 4.0 grade-point average through four years.

Gov. Lucey submits a revised proposal for merger of the state's two systems of higher education. The UW-Green Bay University Committee issues a statement opposing the idea.

The Shorewood golf course re-opens as a nine-hole, public course.

JUNE
Inmates sign up for the first UW-Green Bay offering at the Wisconsin State Reformatory: a three-credit summer course in urban literature taught by Donald Hrubesky.

The timetable for the University's first summer session lists 73 courses in 24 subject areas. Registered in Green Bay are 597 of a four-campus enrollment of 1,049.

A concentration in nutritional sciences is approved as the 12th interdisciplinary major available to undergraduates.

A regent study committee and leaders of university student governments statewide endorse a compromise merger proposal.

JULY
The Legislature's Joint Finance Committee passes the merger bill, calling for immediate merger of the two boards of regents, and sends it to the Senate.

Instructor Michael Culross, Big Yellow Bust adviser, files suit against the University, charging that he was fired for exercising his constitutional rights of free speech. In a creative writing course, Culross had assigned as required reading Beautiful Losers, a collection of poetry by Leonard Cohen that some class members considered pornographic.

AUGUST
UW-Green Bay is among the first six schools in the United States to receive a federal University Year for Action grant. Thirty student volunteers will earn credits and stipends for a year of work in the anti-poverty program headed by faculty anthropologist James Clifton.

SEPTEMBER
The Rev. David Steffenson, a Methodist, joins the Rev. Richard Mauthe, a Roman Catholic, in an ecumenical ministry to the campus community. They work from offices in the Newman Center building near the Green Bay Center.

OCTOBER
Ground is broken for the first two buildings of the College of Creative Communication. A student brass ensemble performs at the site: faculty pianist Arthur Cohrs provides music at a reception in the new student activity center adjacent to the Shorewood clubhouse.

The State Senate and Assembly pass the merger bill. Gov. Lucey signs it in an elaborate ceremony in the statehouse reception room.
In the midst of debate on the admission of China to the United Nations, a community-university task force sponsors a local observance of UN Week.

Alpha Phi Omega fraternity and four campus sororities collect food for Thanksgiving distribution to needy families by the Green Bay Apostolate.

DECEMBER
Women of the classified staff cancel a holiday gift exchange in favor of collecting cash, canned food and clothing for children on the Mole Lake Indian reservation.

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1972

FEBRUARY
A delegation from Venezuela spends five days on the campus studying the UW-Green Bay academic plan, as they prepare to develop a curriculum for the new Universidad Simon Rodriguez.

Library staff members begin transferring books from the Instructional Services Building to the Library-Learning Center.

The Phoenix men wind up a 20-6 basketball season and move on to the NAlA District 14 tournament.

Officials of the Wisconsin State Historical Society establish an Area Research Center in the special collections department of the library.

APRIL
More than 1,700 visitors tour the library during an open house that follows a dedication ceremony.

Earth Week marks the beginning of campus-wide recycling of office paper. Receptacles are placed at 32 locations in University buildings.

Non-teaching professional staff members organize and adopt by-laws for an Academic Staff Association to deal with common interests and concerns.

JUNE
Wayne Wesenberg and Deborah Thyssen exchange marriage vows in an outdoor ceremony. It is the first wedding to take place on the campus.

JULY
Chancellor Weidner and others wield a "gold" shovel in breaking ground for the College of Community
Sciences, fourth major construction project on the campus.

University Year for Action volunteers help to organize a school in Keshena for Menominee Indian children.

Eighty students sign up for membership in the newly organized Green Bay Sailing Club. Headquarters are at the Eagles Nest marina.

AUGUST
Fall semester credit courses are opened free of charge, as space is available, to guest auditors aged 60 and older.

SEPTEMBER
The University offers its first course in American Indian studies: a pilot program in the Oneida language, taught by Orville Clark.

WPNE-TV, Channel 38, goes on the air from studios on the campus. Donald Kates is programming manager. E. Nelson Swinerton and Forrest Armstrong of the faculty team up to teach "Understanding Presidential Elections," the first course televised by the University beyond closed-circuit range.
A cooperative day care center opens near the campus for 25 children of students and employees. Dorothy Parsons is director.

The new UW-Green Bay Visiting Committee meets for the first time. Green Bay members are Pierce Ellis, Charles Bennett, Haydn Evans, Dr. Harold Hoops, Margaret Icks, George Mackin, Lois Philipp, James Quinn, Don Russell, Karen Nelson and Shirlyn Miller. Others are Oliver Thomsen, Neenah: Ray Twining, Marinette: Sheila Kelsey, Sturgeon Bay, and alumni members Tim Mangless and Keith Pamperin.

A study by faculty economist James Murray estimates that the University contributes $26.5 million annually to the regional economy. Annual economic impact is expected to reach $60 million by 1980, Murray says.

DECEMBER
The Library-Learning Center receives an award for exterior building design from the Mayor's Committee for a Cleaner and More Beautiful Green Bay.

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1973

JANUARY
The Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities awards a $15,000 grant for a University Without Walls program. Academic adviser Henry Spille and Carol Pollis of the faculty are named co-directors of planning.

Classroom and office temperatures are lowered to 68 degrees as a severe fuel shortage hits Northeastern Wisconsin.

UW regents cut College of Human Biology buildings from their 1973-75 request for building funds, but retain a $4.8 million item for a physical education facility.

Wisconsin Public Service grants $153,000 for a study of environmental effects of thermal discharges and generating plant operations at the utility's Pulliam plant.

FEBRUARY
The Phoenix men defeat DePaul 63-62 in their first victory over a major college basketball team.

The Building Commission rejects the proposed physical education building: students petition Gov. Lucey to restore it to the biennial budget.

A $430,000 budget cut forces the elimination of 23 faculty positions, primarily in languages and mathematics.

The men's basketball team takes a 15-game winning streak and 26-3 record to the national NAIA tournament in Kansas City. They lose in the quarter finals to Slippery Rock State.

Little, Brown & Company publishes Introduction to Environmental Sciences, by Professors Joseph Moran, Michael Morgan and James Wiersma. It is the first textbook produced by UW-Green Bay faculty members.

MARCH
At a Women Together Again conference, Wilma Scott Heide, president of the National Organization for Women, pushes for support of the Equal Rights Amendment. The measure has now been passed by 28 of the 38 states needed for ratification as the 27th amendment to the Constitution.

Community adults and high school students are invited to join the newly established German Club.

APRIL
Native American Week is observed on campus as American Indian Movement activists continue a 69-day occupation of Wounded Knee, S.D. Speakers at UW-Green Bay include author Vine DeLoria.
French instructor Judith Davis, whose position has been cut, files sex discrimination charges with the state's Department of Labor and Human Relations and the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

A physical education facility for UW-Green Bay is returned to the building budget after being approved by the Joint Finance Committee. Funding, however, has been trimmed to $3.4 million.

A weather emergency—flooding by the Fox River combined with a spring blizzard—forces closing of the University for half a day. Classes resume the next morning.

During Earth Week the University announces cutbacks in energy use that are intended to save 80,000 kilowatts of electricity during the coming year. Plans include curtailment of outdoor lighting and "debulbing" of selected fluorescent fixtures in classrooms and offices.

MAY
The class of 460 spring graduates includes, for the first time, a preponderance of students who have completed all four years in the UW-Green Bay academic plan.

Maryjo Steffel, a junior, is crowned Miss Green Bay.

JUNE
Carol Hammerle takes the post of athletic specialist in physical education, intramurals and intercollegiate sports for women.

JULY
A legislative conference committee studying the 1973-74 state budget defers consideration of the $3.4 million physical education building to a budget review in January 1974.

AUGUST
By line-item veto, Gov. Lucey deletes the UW-Green Bay physical education building from the state budget.

The UW System administration proposes UW-Green Bay and UW- Stout as "special mission" institutions. An open hearing on the UW-Green Bay mission statement is scheduled for November.

Green Bay Transit announces that downtown-to-campus bus service will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, starting in September.

OCTOBER
The Phoenix soccer team beats St. Louis University--rated No.1 in the United States--and advances to No.5 in national rankings.

NOVEMBER
The Creative Communication Building art gallery opens with an exhibition of paintings by Milwaukee artist Mel Kishner.

The State Building Commission approves release of planning funds for a physical education building.

Tony Metzler of the physical plant staff and Mary Ann Chwaszczewski, an executive secretary, become the first employees to win suggestion awards from the UW System.

DECEMBER
As Gov. Lucey reverses his decision on a physical education building, the Building Commission approves construction funds for the project, which the regents have given high priority.

The women's basketball team makes its intercollegiate debut with a 40-36 loss in overtime to Ripon College.

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1974

JANUARY
Patrons of the ballet Pandora get their first look at the University's new theater. Dancers are children and youth of the Northeast Wisconsin Dance Organization, performing under the direction of the ballet's creator, Nikolai Makaroff.

UW regents grant "special mission" status to UW-Green Bay.

A public skating rink opens in a parking lot adjacent to the Shorewood clubhouse. Facilities include lights and a warming house.

FEBRUARY
The Somerville firm wins the bid to design the physical education building. It is the fifth major building project on the campus, and the first to be designed by a local architect.

Pianist Arthur Cohrs performs on a nine-foot Baldwin grand in the first faculty recital in the campus theater.

APRIL
Chancellor Weidner is named vice chairman of a five-year, $1 million study of change in liberal education funded by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation.

An exhibition of fiber art by 20 students opens two weeks of special events marking the dedication of College of Creative Communication buildings. The pieces on display—in knotting, macramé, twining, looping, wrapping, braiding and crochet—were created in the University's first textiles course.

A class in environmental design decorates a 135-foot corridor with the help of a computer. The expanse of yellow, orange and blue squiggles is promptly dubbed "Macaroni Hall."

Judith Davis files suit for $100,000 in federal court, claiming that she lost her job because of discrimination against women.

MAY
The first State Solo and Ensemble Festival hosted by the University brings 2,500 young musicians to the campus from 18 public and parochial schools. Robert Bauer, UW-Green Bay director of bands, organizes and manages the event.

State Sen. Dale McKenna describes UW-Green Bay as "a blunder and boo-boo" during legislative debate on the merger implementation bill.

The UW-Green Bay Founders Association adopts bylaws and elects Bidwell Gage its first president.

JUNE
The Summer Studio Workshop, an art education program for high school students, moves from the UW Center-Marathon County to permanent quarters at UW-Green Bay.

JULY
Assistant Chancellor Harden is assigned responsibility for University relations in addition to student services.

A merger implementation bill passed earlier by the Legislature becomes law. It provides a single statutory charter for the University of Wisconsin System of 13 universities, 14 freshman-sophomore centers and University Extension.

The Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce honors Chancellor Weidner at a testimonial dinner focused on Weidner's activities in international education. Rudy Small is master of ceremonies.

Lyle Bruss, director of campus planning, is elected president of the Green Bay District School Board.

AUGUST
Forty-four young Indians from the Menominee, Oneida and Stockbridge communities sharpen reading and language skills in the summer segment of Wisconsin's only year-around Upward Bound program.
The students, all of middle-school age, live at the Bay Apartments while attending classes on the campus.

WGBW-FM, a 3,000-watt radio station based on the campus, goes on the air at 91.5 on the dial. Fifty student volunteers are supervised by operations manager Annabelle Hitchcock. Gary Mach of educational communications is the engineer.

SEPTEMBER
Mini-courses available at the Brown County Library, Villa West senior housing complex and Woodside Lutheran Home—as well as on the campus—offer one credit for five weeks of work. Conversational German and fabric art are among the offerings in the experimental program.

The State Building Commission authorizes construction of a student union. The $1.3 million facility will be financed by self-amortizing bonds and surpluses in the UW-Green Bay facilities reserve.

UW regents meet for the second time at UW-Green Bay.

Fall enrollment tops 4,000: it includes 180 students taking courses in a new 30-credit graduate program that leads to the master of environmental arts and sciences degree (MEAS).

OCTOBER
The College of Community Sciences is completed and opened to visitors for self-guided tours.

The Marching Phoenix perform for a nationwide audience when the Packers-Buffalo Bills contest airs on NBC television.

Michael Bush, an August graduate, becomes the first ROTC cadet commissioned at UW-Green Bay. The ceremony confers the rank of second lieutenant, U.S. Army.

DECEMBER
Christine Webster, mother of 11, graduates at 60 with a personal concentration in Indian education and culture. A Menominee from Keshena, she becomes the first person in Wisconsin certified to teach Native American languages.

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1975

FEBRUARY
Faculty members Robert Erwin and Nikolai Makaroff, theater, and Trinidad Chavez, music, collaborate to stage Kismet, the University's first student musical.

The American Dietetic Association grants initial approval to the UW-Green Bay dietetics program.

MARCH
Vice Chancellor Maier announces his plans to return to full-time teaching in the managerial systems program.

Dean Beaton resigns to become dean of the College of Human Ecology at the College Park campus of the University of Maryland.

College of Community Sciences buildings win top honors in a national competition sponsored by American School and University magazine.

APRIL
College of Creative Communication buildings win the T.J. Nugent Award for excellence in barrier-free design. The honor follows a March citation by the American Institute of Architects for design excellence, energy conservation and accessibility to the handicapped.

Chancellor Weidner presides over groundbreaking for the Phoenix Sports Center, a $3.35 million physical education facility.
Weidner announces an administrative reorganization, effective July 1. John Reed, as dean of academic affairs, will supervise a staff of four directors, an associate dean and the registrar. The move allows the transfer of $50,000 from administration to academic programs, Weidner says.

On campus as students this year are five children of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kurth of Green Bay: Steve, Chuck and Mark and their sisters Terri Kurth and Jeannie Boersma. They range in age from 18 to 29.

MAY
The regents confirm W. Werner Prange as vice chancellor.

The class of 330 spring graduates includes three inmates of the Wisconsin State Reformatory. Ronald Burrell, Ted Cydzik and Roger Glass are the first persons in the state correctional system to complete college work while incarcerated. They have earned degrees in urban analysis through the University Without Walls program.

The UW-Green Bay chemistry program wins its first accreditation by the American Chemical Society.

JULY
Gerald Olson is promoted from director of student services to dean of students.

AUGUST
A book of poems by Edgar Koch, a Green Bay teacher, becomes the first master's thesis submitted to a graduate committee.

SEPTEMBER
The American Heritage Ensemble, a troupe that originated as the UW-Green Bay Heritage Ensemble, returns to the campus as a full-time professional company directed by its founder, David Peterson. The ensemble stages "musical documentaries" built on the folklore and music of mid-America.

Officials of Bu-Ali Sina University in Iran sign a contract for curriculum consultation. Under the contract, teams of UW-Green Bay faculty members will plan integrated programs in social sciences and natural sciences for Bu-Ali Sina, scheduled to open in 1977.

During a public celebration of the 10th "birthday" of UW-Green Bay, former Gov. Warren Knowles receives a special Chancellor's Award of Merit for his contributions to state government and higher education.

OCTOBER
A 12-foot-high metal sculpture is dedicated as a memorial to Henry Hagemeister Jr. Designed by Hagemeister and executed after his death by Milwaukee artist Daniel Bresnahan, the sculpture is installed near an entrance to the Creative Communication Building.

NOVEMBER
Phoenix soccer players, under new Coach Hank Eichin, finish the season at 13-3 and become the first UW-Green Bay soccer team to win a place in national finals of the NCAA Division II tournament.

The family of John P. Cofrin gives $575,000 to the University to develop a public arboretum around the campus perimeter. The arboretum will memorialize Cofrin, late president of Fort Howard Paper Company, and honor his father, Austin, the company founder and a Green Bay resident.

Ground is broken for a $1.5 million student union, to be known as the University Commons.

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1976

FEBRUARY
The University League opens Second Gear, a resale shop, on the library concourse. Proceeds from the sale of used clothing, household equipment, books and toys will go toward loans and scholarships for students.
Science writer Odom Fanning describes the UW-Green Bay undergraduate program as "carrying to the ultimate the chain of Is--integrated, interdisciplinary and involved." Fanning's comments appear in his new book, Opportunities in Environmental Careers.

MARCH
Eight hundred Explorer Scouts examine careers in paper manufacturing, law enforcement, health care, communications, data processing and other fields during a statewide conference on the campus.

APRIL
Alumnus David Charles, a studio musician in New York City, returns to the campus to direct the Percussion Ensemble

Curtis Graham is appointed to replace Hassa Jadwani as chairman of the professional concentration in managerial Systems.

Students in traditional costumes of their native lands serve up entertainment and culinary delights from Africa, South America, Korea and China at the first international dinner. Patrons pay $2.50 for the meal, which is prepared and served at the Ecumenical Center on Hartung Street, formerly the Newman Center.

Bayshore Outing Center facilities, including an outfitting shop, open to the public.

Ninety-one faculty members sign a letter supporting a moratorium on construction of Interstate Highway 43, linking Green Bay to Milwaukee. Students join area farmers to protest construction of the Green Bay-Sheboygan segment, which they charge will cut many farms in half and pave over 2,000 acres of crop land.

Green Bay native Kurt Rothe is appointed director of libraries.

MAY
Students adopt a new constitution in the first step toward reactivating a student government organization, non-existent since 1972.

May graduate Rob Stevens wins the first Outstanding Student Award for his role in reviving interest in student government.

A UW-Green Bay report reveals that 40 percent of entering freshmen in 1975 were referred to remedial work in writing through the skills learning program (SLP). The 1972 figure was 20 percent.

AUGUST
Students registering for the fall semester can choose from 500 courses, double the number listed in the 1970 timetable. Among them is "Understanding Presidential Elections," the first UW-Green Bay course to be taught statewide by radio. Forrest Armstrong is the professor.

The Phoenix Sports Center opens.

The graduate program in solid waste management wins a $160,000 National Science Foundation grant to establish a resource recovery experiment station and expand the master's degree curriculum in waste management. Charles Rhyner directs the program.

OCTOBER
A Belgian-American ethnic heritage collection is unveiled in the library's Area Research Center. Matching grants from UW-Green Bay and the Wisconsin American Bicentennial Commission provide funds for bringing together papers, oral histories, photographs and other documents related to the history of Belgian settlers in Northeastern Wisconsin.

NOVEMBER
The Founders Association, now at 103 members, establishes leadership and academic excellence scholarships. The group plans to present between 15 and 20 awards each year, beginning in 1977.

DECEMBER
The women's basketball team plays its first game at the Phoenix Sports Center.

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1977

JANUARY
The National Association of Schools of Music grants accreditation for UW-Green Bay programs in music education, music performance and music business.

Stan Kenton and his 19-piece band lead clinic sessions and perform at Jazz Fest.

FEBRUARY
Classroom and office temperatures are reduced to 63 degrees during the day to comply with an emergency directive from Gov. Lucey. Some daytime classes are reassigned to heated areas, and thermostats are set at 53 degrees in unused rooms.

Food service begins at the new University Commons.

A once-a-week sports and exercise program for seniors registers 125 community men and women aged 55 and older. They will use campus facilities for swimming, racquetball, golf, tennis and fitness activities

Comedian Dick Gregory brings his act to the campus during Black History Week.

MARCH
The first Women in Business Conference attracts 200 women and men to a day of speeches and seminars. Leaders include Rufus Suhrke, Class of 1974, who is the first woman manager of a 35-man crew on the toilet tissue line at Procter & Gamble Paper Products.

APRIL
The debut concert of the 21-member Phoenix Dance Ensemble highlights a century of social dance, from 1870s waltzes to contemporary rock rhythms. Karen Cowan is director.

Antoinette Panneck, Class of 1973, signs a two-year acting contract for appearances in the daytime television series "The Doctors."

MAY
In a series on UW-Green Bay, News-Chronicle reporter Arlene Levinson refers to the University's academic terminology as "a polysyllabic migraine."

Construction and planting begin in the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum.

JUNE
Sister Nivard Schaefer of the School Sisters of Notre Dame is named to a half-time position as arboretum director.

JULY
George Rupp begins his appointment as dean for academic affairs. He succeeds John Reed, who has reached mandatory retirement age.

Members of the Wisconsin State Employees Union—utilities and maintenance workers and some members of the secretarial staff —go out on strike.

SEPTEMBER
Registrar Ronald Dhuey reports that undergraduate enrollment shows an increase for the first time in three years. The good news includes a 30 percent gain in new freshmen from Brown County. At the same time, enrollment of students 25 and older reaches 31 percent of the total head count.

OCTOBER
Classroom and office temperatures are set at 67 degrees when rooms are occupied and 57 degrees when they are empty.

Twenty-six seniors from Wisconsin and Minnesota high schools receive the first Leadership and Academic Excellence Scholarships, provided by funds from the Founders Association and other private sources. An endowment from the family of the late S.W. Frankenthal will enable the University to increase the number of awards to about 40 next year. Other scholarships are endowed by Mrs. Walter Scherf in memory of her husband, by Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Trampe, and the Lucy Peckham Gfoerer estate.

DECEMBER
Trinidad Chavez leads the first community "sing-in" of Handel's Messiah at Grace Lutheran Church.

Winter graduates include the University's first four candidates for the associate of arts degree.

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1978

FEBRUARY
Lyle Bruss, director of facilities planning, is elected president of the Brown County Commission on Aging.

The men's basketball team ends a record 23-game winning streak with a 55-49 loss to DePaul, eighth in national rankings.

The extended degree program becomes the first in the state to grant college credit for educational life experience on the basis of an assessment of prior learning.

Fried chicken, barbecued ribs, collard greens and sweet potato pudding are enjoyed by 160 patrons of the second annual soul food luncheon. The event is sponsored by the Ethnic Heritage Center and Black Student Union.

MAY
Management of the Bay Apartments reduces rents by 20 percent, effective as of the summer session, and announces plans for renovations to make the units more attractive to students. The complex, with space for 576 students, now houses 274.

JUNE
Faculty physicist Charles Rhyner is named director of the graduate program. He succeeds Martin Greenberg, who will return to full-time teaching.

JULY
Rick Whitt, a local radio talk show host, becomes the first full-time manager of WGBW, the campus radio station.

City, town and village clerks from 48 communities become the first to enroll in courses offered by the Wisconsin Municipal Clerks Institute, a summer program of continuing education offered by the public and environmental administration unit.

SEPTEMBER
The housing office reports that occupancy of the Bay Apartments has increased to 345. Monthly rent—reduced from $80.50 to $65 per student in an apartment for four—is now lowest in the UW System.

Bonni Yordi is appointed director of extended degree and individualized learning programs.

OCTOBER
A report from the registrar reveals that 70 percent of the students enrolled the previous spring have returned for the fall semester. The new freshman count of 597 is the largest since 1974, exceeding official projections for the first time.

After three years of planning, the library inaugurates a computerized check-out system.

NOVEMBER
Advisers note an improvement in writing skills of new students: of 633 incoming freshmen, 51 percent have satisfied the English proficiency requirement, 39 percent are assigned to English 100, basic college writing, and 10 percent to a one-semester remedial program.

DECEMBER
Dean George Rupp announces that he has accepted appointment as dean of Harvard Divinity School.

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1979

JANUARY
Donald Harden is promoted to associate chancellor. His responsibilities now include administrative oversight of student services, University relations and instructional services.

An all-day conference sponsored by the Office of Outreach focuses on violence against women.

FEBRUARY
The Faculty Senate votes to add ROTC courses to the regular curriculum through a cross-enrollment agreement with St. Norbert College.

Pirates of Penzance is staged as the first of a series of Gilbert & Sullivan productions on campus.

Spring semester enrollment of 350 graduate students sets a new record.

MARCH
UW regents grant entitlement to award a bachelor of science degree in social work.

The UW System sustains a $3 million budget cut, and officials warn that campus closings are possible in the future.

The UW-Green Bay Sailing Club wins No.1 ranking in the Midwest on the basis of its performance during the spring regatta season of the Midwest Collegiate Sailing Association. The group includes member teams from 31 public and private colleges and universities.

APRIL
Lee Meyers, Florence, and Russell O'Harrow, Oconto, join five Green Bay residents on a newly constituted UW-Green Bay Board of Visitors. Local members are Benjamin Teague, Jeanette Hutchinson, Sylvia Kaufman, Lucille Kotas and Jack Pischner.

William Kuepper replaces George Rupp as chief administrator for academic affairs, effective July 1. Title of the post is changed from dean to vice chancellor for academic affairs.

The U.S. Court of Appeals decides in favor of UW-Green Bay in the Judith Davis suit. Although the court finds Davis to be qualified for her position, it rules that because student enrollments have been falling in her instructional area, the University is justified in not renewing her appointment.

JUNE
The National Science Foundation awards UW-Green Bay $196,000 to expand curriculum and equipment for a computer science program.

Elderhostel comes to the campus. Two one-week sessions for over-60 learners offer courses in Irish writers, human sexuality, science and controversy, and gemstones and minerals, all taught by UW-Green Bay faculty.

JULY
Robert Maier leaves to become vice chancellor of East Carolina University, a campus of 14,000 students.

AUGUST
The "no vacancy" sign goes up for the first time at the Bay Apartments, as negotiations begin for purchase of the facility by the University.

SEPTEMBER
WGBW radio doubles the hours it will be on the air. The new schedule provides programming from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. daily.

NOVEMBER
Glen Slaats of LaCrosse joins WGBW as station manager.

UW regents approve a major in environmental planning.

Chancellor Weidner announces that the University will "go Division I" in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

DECEMBER
Robert O'Neil succeeds John Weaver as president of the UW System. He predicts falling enrollments at UW campuses as the numbers of college-age students decline over the next 15 years.

A segment of a children's health series starring "Slim Goodbody" captures national awards for program content and studio set design. The six-part series has been created at UW-Green Bay by the University's teleproduction staff.

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Johnson of Racine endow the Herbert Fisk Johnson Award for Excellence. The gift will provide scholarships for students involved in study projects that "exemplify innovative aspects of the UW-Green Bay academic plan."

The December graduating class includes David Kieper, 20, who has completed his undergraduate work in two-and-a-half years.

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1980

JANUARY
January interim courses enroll 1,613 students, almost 200 more than in 1979.

FEBRUARY
The Office of Outreach initiates a "learn and shop" program at Port Plaza Mall downtown. Three credit courses enroll 108 men and women during the spring semester.

MARCH
The University purchases the Bay Apartments for $2 million from Inland Steel Development Corporation and changes the name of the complex to University Village. The transaction enlarges the campus to 700 acres, including 40 acres of land adjacent to the housing complex contributed by the developer to the University of Wisconsin Foundation.

The women's basketball team wraps up the Wisconsin Women's Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Division II title with an undefeated 8-0 record in conference play.

APRIL
UW regents approve a degree completion program in nursing, open to registered nurses seeking the bachelor of science in nursing.

U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy, campaigning on campus for the Democratic presidential nomination, blasts Carter administration policies that have contributed to spiraling inflation: five percent to 19 percent in four years.

MAY
Dedication of a Small Business Development Center caps a banner year for the Office of Business Outreach, operated cooperatively with UW Extension. Despite a sagging economy, a record 2,100 men and women—including managers, supervisors, salespeople, secretaries and labor negotiators—have taken part in 91 instructional programs during the academic year.

Gov. Lee Dreyfus attends the first outdoor commencement—as a proud father-in-law. Among the 260 graduates is Susan Dreyfus of Oconto County, who has completed a bachelor's degree with honors in business administration.

A gilt from the Fort Howard Foundation provides lights for the Phoenix soccer field.

JUNE
Thomas Haevers, a counselor at the UW Center-Fox Valley, is appointed the first director of housing.

The NCAA grants Division I status to UW-Green Bay intercollegiate athletic programs, beginning in fall 1981. High school students from Wisconsin and Upper Michigan attend the first computer science camp.

JULY
With the departure of Paul Davis, Associate Chancellor Harden takes over responsibility for the Founders Association.

SEPTEMBER
Enrollment tops 4,000 for the first time. Tuition for full-time undergraduates is up by 10 percent over
1979-80, to $926 a year.

Gifts from the Frankenthal Family Foundation establish the first endowed professorship, honoring the late S.W. Frankenthal.

OCTOBER
Chancellor Weidner presides over formal opening of the Tower Drive bridge, an 8,000-foot span rising
120 feet above the Fox River. The new bridge, providing a connection between U.S. Highway 41 and
State Highway 54-57 via Interstate 43, is hailed by Weidner as "truly a community accomplishment,
essential to fulfilling our communiversity mission."

A report to the UW System discloses that over the last seven years UW-Green Bay has cut its energy consumption by 56 percent while increasing by 18 percent the area to be heated, cooled and ventilated.

NOVEMBER
A $30,000 cutback in library funds forces cancellation of 400 subscriptions to periodicals.

Coach David Buss, annoyed with some local sports reporters, bans post-game media interviews of players on the men's basketball team.

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1981

JANUARY
The Trojan Women, directed by Patricia Ridge, becomes the first student theater effort to advance to regional finals in the American College Theatre Festival.

FEBRUARY
Sand, palm trees and a miniature ocean provide atmosphere for a Valentine's Day "beach party" at the
Shorewood Club activities center. Highlights include a wiener roast, nerf volleyball tournament, beach
movies starring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, and a Frankie and Annette look-alike contest.

A $90,000 cut in the campus budget will mean a hiring freeze, layoffs of some limited-term and student employees, and reductions in capital purchases and supplies and expense budgets, according to UW-Green Bay officials.

The sailing team cracks national intercollegiate rankings for the first time, pulling a No. 15—ahead of Harvard and Yale— in the 20-team listing of Yacht Racing/Cruising magazine.

Thirty-one textile artists are represented in the "Contemporary Quilting" exhibition in the UW-Green Bay galleries. Assembled under the direction of Karon Hagemeister Winzenz, curator of art, the national invitational show will tour in four states during 1981-82.

MARCH
Students and staff attend Midwest premiere showings of The Living Planet, filmed in 70 mm IMAX at 32 locations around the world. The Johnson Wax Company of Racine is underwriting costs of the campus screenings and related activities.

Phoenix women chalk up a 23-3 record in their first 20-game season and move on to the Ww'AC basketball tournament in Milwaukee. The men's team takes the NCAA Division II regionals and reaches the Division II final four for the third time in four years.

Students from eight Green Bay high schools vie for honors in an academic competition at UW-Green Bay. The first-time event is a cooperative project of area schools, the University and Northeastern Wisconsin Gifted and Talented, Inc.

APRIL
Agnes Janoscrat comes from Gonzaga University to be director of the nursing program.

MAY
Anthropologist James Clifton is awarded the first Frankenthal Professorship.

Baritone Trinidad Chavez of the music faculty introduces the UW-Green Bay Alma Mater in a solo performance at commencement. The hymn-like melody is the work of Lovell Ives, director of jazz activities. Faculty poet Peter Stambler has written the words. Degree candidates include Kenneth Nimocks, first extended degree graduate.

JUNE
Bayfest promoter Tim Quigley predicts that the new food-and-fun community event will be "the greatest summer entertainment north of Milwaukee's Summerfest." Proceeds will go to intercollegiate athletics programs.

Gifts from the Arlene Walter estate include $100,000 to establish a Byron L. Walter family scholarship fund at UW-Green Bay. The Committee for Campus Ministry receives an initial $500,000 grant for an Ecumenical Center to serve the campus.

Registrar Ronald Dhuey announces that 19 fall semester courses have been closed to further enrollment, and no funds are available to open new sections.

JULY
DePere residents Randall and Catherine Lawton give $50,000 to renovate and enlarge facilities for art exhibits.

SEPTEMBER
Ballet Metropolitan of Columbus, Ohio, opens the Visiting Artists series. Performing in major roles is former Green Bay resident Kathy Brenner, who as a pre-teen appeared with UW-Green Bay students and community dancers in a 1973 production of Peter and the Wolf.

OCTOBER
Associate Chancellor Harden helps to cut the ribbon on the final segment of 1-43, a four-lane, non-stop highway linking Green Bay with the interstate system in Milwaukee. Harden calls the opening "a milestone in the life of the University," making the campus "accessible in a safe, economic way to the people we serve."

NOVEMBER
The UW-Green Bay sailing team wins No.11 ranking in the nation.

Ground is broken for an Ecumenical Center on a privately owned two-acre tract between the Phoenix Sports Center parking lot and the University Village apartments.

Associate Chancellor Harden takes over responsibility for UW-Green Bay intercollegiate athletics, as Bruce Grimes, athletic director, accepts a post at the University of North Florida.

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1982

JANUARY
Guided walks on the trails and demonstrations of showshoe and cross-country ski technique are offered during open house at the Cofrin Arboretum nature center.

FEBRUARY
Chancellor Weidner protests Gov. Lee Dreyfus's call for a four percent cut in the University of
Wisconsin budget. In the last four years, Weidner says, while the UW-Green Bay student population has
increased by almost 1,000—27 per cent—the campus has lost $750,000 from its budget.

The registrar's office reports that a January interim enrollment of 2,084 has set a new record and continued a trend of increasing enrollments during the one-month semester.

MARCH
Under Visiting Artists Series sponsorship, the Vienna Choir Boys sing to a sold-out house at Preble
High School.

Chuck Lane, former public relations director for the Green Bay Packers, signs on as sports information and promotion coordinator.

The Phoenix women roll to a 24-6 season overall and win the WWIAC Division II basketball championship with a 10-0 record in conference play. April Jensen becomes the first player to post career totals over 1,000 in both scoring and rebounding.

APRIL
Students, faculty and guests don medieval costumes for the first Feast of Fools, an April Fools Day frolic planned by the Humanities Council.

David Buss is removed from his post of head basketball coach and reassigned to other duties. He is replaced by Dick Lien, a UW-Green Bay assistant coach since 1980.

MAY
Commencement festivities include a banquet at the Shorewood Club to honor six American Indian graduates. It's the first such event at UW-Green Bay.

JULY
The University joins seven more schools to form the Association of Mid-Continent Universities (AMCU) to compete in NCAA Division I basketball and other sports. Chancellor Weidner is elected AMCU president for 1982-83.

AUGUST
Thomas Hogan, director of educational testing, becomes director of graduate studies. He replaces Charles Rhyner, who will return to teaching full time.

SEPTEMBER
David Buss resigns to become an assistant basketball coach at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.

Disabled and elderly patrons of Bucket Dance Theatre performances are the first to use a shuttle bus service provided by the American Red Cross. The bus delivers passengers from a campus parking lot to the University Theatre.

A capacity class of 15 students signs up for the inaugural semester of a German language "immersion" program. Werner Prange and Martha Wallach share teaching duties in the 15-credit course.

OCTOBER
Dedication programs celebrate the opening of new campus facilities: the $750,000 Ecumenical Center, built and furnished with private gifts: a 2,000-square-foot greenhouse: and a small museum to house the Richter Natural History collection.

Forest pathologists from India, China, Korea, Japan and Canada join U.S. scientists at a campus conference on mycoplasma diseases sponsored by the International Union of Forestry Research Organizations. V.M.G. Nair of the environmental sciences faculty has organized the meeting with the help of students in science and environmental change.

DECEMBER
The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) grants full accreditation to the UW-Green Bay music program. The program has held associate NASM membership since 1976.

Eight women receive bachelor of science in nursing degrees at December commencement. They are the first to graduate in the new degree completion program.

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1983

JANUARY
The first Winterfest—a scaled-down, indoor version of Bayfest —nets $10,000 for intercollegiate athletics.

The first Alumni Invitational exhibits art works by Earl Madden, Gisela Moyer and Sandra Shackelford in the newly remodeled Lawton Gallery.

Pianist Arthur Cohrs becomes the first member of the music faculty invited to perform for a statewide audience on the "Sunday Afternoon Live" concert series of the Wisconsin Educational Radio Network.

MARCH
The Phoenix men finish their second Division I basketball season with a 9-19 record. The women finish 22-8 during the regular season, but lose to UW-Milwaukee in the NAIA District 14 tournament.

The Northeast Wisconsin section of the American Chemical Society charters a UW-Green Bay student affiliate chapter. President of the new affiliate is James Gilson. Jack Norman is faculty adviser.

APRIL
Earth Day originator Gaylord Nelson, now chairman of the Wilderness Society, returns to the campus as an Earth Week speaker.

Performances of Peter Stambler's new play, Clara's Husband, is the centerpiece of an eight-day festival celebrating the lives and works of composer Robert Schumann and his circle.

JUNE
Thomas Birmingham, director of arts and performances since 1969, leaves to become managing director of the Ballet Metropolitan in Columbus, 0hio.

JULY
At a special meeting called by David Jowett, Faculty Senate speaker, 130 faculty and academic staff members protest Gov. Anthony Earl's salary proposals for 1983-85: a salary freeze the first year and 3.7 percent average raise the second year. The meeting produces plans for a political action committee and $2,000 in pledges to support lobbying efforts to reverse the decline in quality of the UW System.

AUGUST
Voluntary contributions to the political action committee through payroll deduction will bring in $6,000 a year, says PAC chairman Jowett.

The Center for Television Production releases The Grandstand Franchise, a documentary about the Green Bay Packers.

SEPTEMBER
Anaerobic digestion is plugged into the waste water treatment system at the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District plant. Operation of the full-sized digester follows 27 months of research and testing directed by Leander Schwartz of the faculty. Schwartz estimates that methane gas produced in the process can fuel a 15 to 20 percent saving in the annual energy bill at MSD.

The registrar's office reports an all-time record enrollment of 1,886 in the 1983 summer session.

Education-reading and curriculum and instruction become the third and fourth graduate programs initiated at UW-Green Bay in cooperation with other UW System units. UW-Oshkosh offers the reading degree and UW-Milwaukee the curriculum program. Teachers who enroll can complete all courses at UW-Green Bay.

OCTOBER
Audrey Hanson, secretary in the educational research office, wins the first award for excellence in clerical support services. Faculty, staff and students submitted nominations for the award.

Two bells produced in a German foundry are installed in the Ecumenical Center bell tower. They were purchased with a $15,000 gift from the Catholic Woman's Club of Green Bay.

Students DyAnn Buechler, Gail Ellis, Patricia Reinhard and Scott Kassner are named Wingspread Fellows for 1983-84. Chosen on the basis of social concern and academic excellence, they will be observers or participants in selected conferences at the Wingspread Conference Center in Racine, with expenses paid by the Johnson Foundation.

NOVEMBER
Chuck Lane leaves UW-Green Bay to join the Arizona Wranglers, United States Football League, as vice president.

The soccer team wins its first bid to an NCAA Division I tournament.

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1984

JANUARY
Preparations for a capital campaign begin as Weidner appoints Donald Long head of a leadership awareness committee and names a "blue ribbon panel" to evaluate UW-Green Bay programs and activities.

The Wisconsin Board of Nursing awards full accreditation to the degree completion program in nursing.

Rong Yue and Yang Xiao Ping enroll in the graduate program in environmental science. They are the first UW-Green Bay students from the People's Republic of China.

FEBRUARY
A New York City troupe brings rappers and break dancers to the campus and leaves behind a graffiti installation in the ceramics studio.

The State Building Commission approves final plans and authorizes a $1.3 million addition to the University Commons. Work will start in August on the 9,100-square-foot addition, which will be financed by state borrowing and University revenues recovered from student fees.

MARCH
Weidner predicts a "golden age" for the campus between 1990 and 2010, as relatively large-scale faculty retirements— allowing a reallocation of budget dollars—are coupled with a bulge in the number of high school graduates.

The swimming and diving team, coached by Roger Harriman, takes the national NAIA championship, and Harriman is named national NAIA coach of the year.

Weidner names Donald Long and James Temp co-chairmen of the University's first capital campaign. Providing dormitory-style housing for resident students will be a major objective of the $2.2 million drive, Weidner says.

MAY
Faculty members salute departing colleagues at a commencement weekend dinner. Five of the 12 are moving to faculty positions at other universities. Per Johnsen, Richard Logan and Peter Stambler are taking sabbatical leaves: Michael Kraft will be a visiting professor at Oberlin College and Craig Lockard will spend a year in Malaysia as a Fulbright-Hays research fellow. Faculty exchanges will take Martha Wallach to the University of Kassel in Germany and Ron Baba to Aalborg in Denmark.

JULY
Research on converting industrial waste to fertilizer wins a $96,000 grant from the state's new technology development fund for Nancy Sell of the faculty and the Feeco firm of Green Bay.

AUGUST
Linda Erwin's grant proposals win $18,000 from regional arts agencies to support the 1984-85 season of performing arts events and residencies.

SEPTEMBER
A new interdisciplinary major in information and computing sciences is officially open to students.

A $1.9 million grant to the UW Sea Grant Institute assures that a comprehensive study of the Green Bay ecosystem can continue, says Hallett Harris, director of the Green Bay program at UW-Green Bay. Harris has supervised the research for six years.

NOVEMBER
Weidner announces that $1.85 million has been received in cash, pledges and gifts-in-kind in the advance gifts phase of the capital funds campaign. Gifts include a $173,000 grant from the Arlene Walter estate to finance road and site development for student housing. Four residence halls, each housing 60 students, will be built with private funds on land donated by Inland Steel Development Corporation.

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1985

JANUARY
Trinidad Chavez announces the first auditions for a show-jazz choir. Sixteen singers and nine instrumentalists are sought for the new ensemble, which will begin rehearsals in the fall.

FEBRUARY
Robert O'Neil, third UW System president in the 13 years since merger, resigns to become president of the University of Virginia.

Coach Dick Lien announces his resignation, effective at the end of the basketball season. The team record stands at 3-18 with seven games to go.

MARCH
Dick Bennett succeeds Dick Lien as head basketball coach.

Groundbreaking signals the beginning of a $1.2 million residence hall project on a 38-acre parcel of land adjacent to the student apartment complex. Buildings will be ready for occupancy by fall.

MAY
Bayfest expands to two days and adds attractions including a fireworks display and kite-flying contest.

Guest speaker at spring commencement is Edgar L. Harden, president emeritus of Michigan State University and former president of Northern Michigan College, now Northern Michigan University. He is the father of Associate Chancellor Donald Harden. Among those receiving degrees is Ada Billings, 69.

JUNE
Vice Chancellor Kuepper is appointed to a one-year term as interim vice president for academic affairs of the UW System. Kuepper will fill the vacancy created by the appointment of Katharine Lyall as acting president, pending the naming of a successor to Robert O'Neil. Starting in September, Kuepper will be in Madison on leave from UW-Green Bay.

Daniel Spielmann is promoted to director of intercollegiate athletics.

The Pamiro Opera Company stages Don Pasquale in the University Theatre.

JULY
After 17 years at the University, Marge Engelman, director of outreach, moves to Madison to be assistant to the chancellor of University Extension. Bonnie Yordi, director of extended degree and individualized learning programs, leaves after 14 years for a position in private industry. She is replaced by UW-Green Bay graduate Katherine Olski. David Jowett of the faculty is named acting vice chancellor for academic affairs.

AUGUST
With the opening of dormitories, UW-Green Bay is on the road to becoming a student community instead of a commuter campus, says Vice Chancellor Jowett in a news interview.

SEPTEMBER
The fall semester begins with 750 resident students, including 240 in the new residence halls. Residence halls and campus apartments are filled to capacity.

UW regents hold their monthly meeting in the new Student Union (formerly University Commons), launching a year-long observance of the 20th anniversary of the founding of UW-Green Bay. Werner Prange heads the anniversary committee.

The Socio-Ecology Building is renamed Wood Hall in honor of the late L.G. Wood, a local entrepreneur and philanthropist.

Weidner announces his resignation as chancellor, effective June 30, 1986.

OCTOBER
Bruce Ehr, director of placement from 1969 to 1984, retires for health reasons.

NOVEMBER
After serving for a year on the Green Bay Packers board of directors, Associate Chancellor Harden is elected to the Packers' seven-member executive committee.

During a rain-soaked ceremony at the base of a 40-foot observation tower off Bay Settlement Road, the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum is dedicated in memory of John P. Cofrin and Austin E. Cofrin. The event takes place just 10 years after a major gift from the Cofrin family initiated development of the arboretum.

UW System regents appoint a 13-member chancellor search committee for UW-Green Bay.

DECEMBER
A 13-inch snowfall blankets the area. For the second time in UW-Green Bay history, classes are canceled and offices closed.

Myron Van de Ven, director of admissions, reports that nearly half of all student aid is now administered as loans instead of outright grants—a "dramatic change" from six or seven years earlier, he says.

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1986

JANUARY
UW regents approve a $35 increase in student fees per semester to help finance a $27.4 million cut in a biennial budget passed just six months earlier. Regents launch a study of prospects for the UW System in the year 2000.

Kenneth (Buzz) Shaw, chancellor of the Southern Illinois University System, takes the reins as 18th president of the University of Wisconsin.

FEBRUARY
As the month ends, the chancellor search committee reports 170 applications for the job from all over the United States.

The new show-jazz choir presents its first public concert on campus before taking off on a three-day, five-performance tour to Wisconsin high schools.

MARCH
President Shaw predicts that budget cuts will force the imposition of enrollment targets at some UW System campuses.

APRIL
A sculptor, a historian and a physicist are guest speakers at a 20th anniversary conference "in celebration of interdisciplinary education."

Gov. Tony Earl signs Wisconsin's landmark acid rain bill during an Earth Week visit to the campus.

As the chancellor search committee begins interviews with 10 finalists, Weidner accepts the post of arboretum director, starting in the fall.

Chancellor Weidner announces that the Office of Educational Research and Development will be eliminated, effective July 1. The closing is one of several steps toward meeting state-mandated budget cuts, Weidner says.

MAY
Weidner presides over dedication of the 1965 Room, a private dining room honoring early citizen supporters of a University in Green Bay, and of the Student Union addition. Union facilities include the 200-seat Christie Theatre, named for the late Richard Christie, director of student life programs from 1973 until his death in 1984.

Community supporters join members of the University family, legislators and state officials at a dinner saluting Weidner's 20 years of service to UW-Green Bay.

JUNE
UW regents name David L. Outcalt the second chancellor of UW-Green Bay. Regents also give preliminary approval to a plan designed to reduce UW System enrollment by 3,000 students through selective tuition increases, stricter admission standards and enrollment limits.

In his last official act as chancellor, Weidner presides over the dedication and naming of four residence halls. Two buildings are named for Josephine and the late T.J. Lenfestey: the others honor the memory of Byron Walter and his daughter, Arlene Walter.

Associate Chancellor Harden is appointed acting chancellor, pending the arrival of Chancellor Outcalt in September.

SEPTEMBER
The Green Bay Housing Authority grants preliminary approval for construction of three more residence halls by University Village Housing, Inc. The $1.3 million project is scheduled for completion by fall 1987.

NOVEMBER
A Fort Howard Paper Company gift of $25,000 brings the firm's contributions for soccer scholarships to a total of $146,000 since 1979.

DECEMBER
An agreement initiated by former Chancellor Weidner and signed in final form by Chancellor Outcalt and President Wang Zikun of Beijing Normal University establishes the first student and faculty exchange with an Asian institution of higher education. Robert Wenger of the mathematics faculty will be the first professor to teach in China under the program.

David Jowett is named vice chancellor for academic affairs, effective Jan. 1, 1987. He has served as acting vice chancellor since July 1985.

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1987

FEBRUARY
Thirty-six students—half of whom identify themselves as Indian - enroll in the first course to be offered in a new minor in American Indian studies.

Chancellor Outcalt's new Budget and Planning Council meets for the first time. Members represent the administration, academic staff, faculty, Student Association and Alumni Association.

Local sports writers hail a turnaround in the fortunes of the men's basketball team. After a 1-6 season's beginning, Coach Dick Bennett's players have chalked up a 9-9 mark to date and attracted an average home gate of 2,800—double the average crowd in 1985-86. Women cagers, meanwhile—20-game winners for six previous seasons - have won 14 of the first 16 games for a No.13 ranking nationally among NAIA teams.

MARCH
UW regents approve an enrollment management plan to cut UW System enrollment by 7,000 students over four years.

The professional nursing program wins eight-year accreditation from the National League of Nursing.

In ceremonies at the Phoenix Sports Center, UW President Kenneth Shaw installs David L. Outcalt as the second chancellor of UW-Green Bay.

Phoenix women win the NAIA District 14 basketball title and place third in the national tournament.

APRIL
Outcalt announces a $4 million pledge from Dr. David and Mary Ann Cofrin to support development of a performing arts center to serve the campus and community.

Ground is broken for three more residence halls. They will be built by University Village Housing, Inc., on land donated by the UW Foundation. By fall, when the buildings open, campus housing will be available to almost 1,000 students.

MAY
Outcalt names a university-community committee to develop preliminary plans for the proposed performing arts center.

The admissions office reports that applications are up by 43 percent and admissions by 37 percent compared to the previous year. Brown County students have increased by 57 percent. Because of enrollment limits, continuing students are urged to register by mid-June for fall semester classes.

Campus planners announce that the former clubhouse of the Shorewood Country Club—used for several years as a student activity center and now seriously deteriorating—will be razed during the summer.

AUGUST
Following the resignation of David Jowett, John Visser is appointed acting vice chancellor. Jowett returns to full-time teaching. Visser, former president of Emporia State University in Kansas, will hold the office for a year during a vice chancellor search.

Just-completed residence halls are named for R. E. Small, State Rep. Cletus Vanderperren and federal Judge Robert Warren.

OCTOBER
Condom vending machines are installed in University housing units, the Student Union and Phoenix Sports Center.

DECEMBER
The University and Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce co-sponsor the region's first conference on biotechnology.

Linda Pratsch, Class of 1971, returns to Green Bay to celebrate opening of the Northeast Wisconsin
Community Clinic in a new $450,000 building. The new facility for low-income clients replaces the
Green Bay Free Clinic, first organized by Pratsch in 1971 during her service as a University Year for
Action volunteer.

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1988

FEBRUARY
Chancellor Outcalt and his violin are featured in the title song of Fiddler on the Roof. A campus production of the Broadway hit plays to capacity audiences during five performances in the University Theatre.

A campus task force adopts an enrollment management plan that seeks to cap 1988-89 enrollment at 3,856 full-time-equivalent students (FTEs).

APRIL
Robert Lorelli of New York City is retained as design consultant for the proposed performing arts center. Working from concepts of the planning committee, he will provide technical information on such concerns as design and acoustics of the main auditorium, arrangement of spaces and circulation patterns.

At a campus reception for supporters of a performing arts center, chief donor Dr. David Cofrin proposes that the facility be named for the founding chancellor, Edward W. Weidner.

The Rev. Anita Hendrix is installed as Protestant campus minister at the Ecumenical Center. She succeeds the Rev. David Steffenson, campus minister since 1971.

MAY
Outcalt announces a reorganization of the Office of Academic Affairs. Under the new structure, three deans will report to the vice chancellor. Each will be responsible for several academic areas and selected campuswide programs. Three additional part-time positions will be filled at the associate dean or director level.

UW President Shaw speaks at spring commencement. During the ceremony, local attorney Fred Will receives the Chancellor's Award of Merit. Will is co-trustee of the Arlene Walter Trust, which has provided scholarship funds, construction and furnishing of the Ecumenical Center, and a challenge gilt in the capital campaign.

JUNE
As a seven-month vice chancellor search is suspended, William Kuepper is appointed interim vice chancellor. He starts July 1.

JULY
Faculty members Carol Pollis and Donald Larmouth are appointed deans, joining Dean Robert Bauer in the Office of Academic Affairs.

SEPTEMBER
The UW-Green Bay Office of Outreach and the Center for Public Affairs join with UW Extension to offer a series of breakfast seminars on the subject "What's happening downtown?"

Beckley/Myers, a Milwaukee architectural firm, is chosen to design the performing arts center at UW-Green Bay.

Thirteen local business people meet to organize the Phoenix Fund, which will coordinate fund-raising activities for the University's NCAA Division I athletics program.

The University is granted its first 10-year renewal of accreditation by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and the undergraduate program in social work wins national accreditation from the Council on Social Work Education.

During a three-week visit to the Soviet Union, Outcalt explores student and faculty exchanges with government and University officials.

A vice chancellor search committee resumes its work.

OCTOBER
At the invitation of the Soviet medical workers union, wildlife ecologist Hallett Harris attends a Moscow-Kiev international conference on environmental problems.

An open house reception celebrates the 10th anniversary of the UW-Green Bay extended degree program, which leads to the bachelor of general studies degree. Currently enrolled are 325 students from 39 counties. They range in age from 25 to 72.

NOVEMBER
Louise Witherell of the humanistic studies faculty files age and sex discrimination charges with the Wisconsin Personnel Commission.

Daytime performances of Wind in the Willows bring 4,500 children to the campus from 23 area schools. The student production is directed by Richard Sherrell.

The Green Bay Housing Authority approves a request for revenue bonds to help finance three more residence halls. They will be built by University Village Housing, Inc., for occupancy in fall 1989.

DECEMBER
Marilyn Thorn of Bonduel and Antonio Saldana of Green Bay are among midyear graduates. Thorn, mother of nine children, is receiving her degree in social work and psychology. Saldana is an honors graduate in Spanish. He is one of 14 children of migrant workers.

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1989

FEBRUARY
Women make up 62 percent of the University's undergraduate enrollment, according to a report from the registrar's office. Seventy-five percent of undergraduates come from seven Northeastern Wisconsin counties, and business administration is the most popular choice of academic major. Other majors in the "top 10," in order, are human development, managerial accounting, psychology, communication processes, social work, mathematics, nursing, art and biology.

MARCH
A $320,000 gift in memory of Lester G. and Laura P. Wood is designated for purchase of a three-manual pipe organ to be installed in the performing arts center. The gift comes from Paper Converting Machine Company, the Lester G. Wood Foundation, and Patricia and Frederick Baer, daughter and son-in-law of the Woods.

MAY
UW regents confirm the selection of William Kuepper as vice chancellor for academic affairs, a post Kuepper has held for 10 months on an interim basis. The regents also approve emeritus status for Weidner, who will retire from the faculty in June.

At spring commencement the University awards its first honorary doctorate to Joseph Murphy, president of the City University of New York. Recipients of the Chancellor's Award of Merit are the six children of the late John Cofrin Sr. Their gifts have initiated and developed the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum on the campus.

The George Kress Foundation pledges a $250,000 endowment gift to support an annual concert of symphonic music at the performing arts center.

JUNE
The Children's Center receives accreditation from the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs. The center now provides day care 12 months of the year, serving up to 100 campus and community families each semester.

In competition with student government organizations throughout the UW System, the UW-Green Bay Student Association wins its third President's Award for "forward-looking, professional performance in working with University colleagues for constructive change." Announcement of the honor is made at the monthly meeting of the UW regents. The association also received the award in 1983 and 1986.

JULY
In recognition of a $750,000 gift from the Fort Howard Foundation to the performing arts center, the building's 250-seat ensemble hall will be named Fort Howard Hall. The gift brings the center campaign to 75 percent of its goal for private contributions.

Radio station WGBW becomes an affiliate of Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) and an associate member of National Public Radio. The campus station is designated regional office of WPR, with manager Glen Slaats overseeing operations at four other public radio stations in the state.

AUGUST
Just-completed residence halls are dedicated in honor of Donald Long Sr., Robert W. Schaefer and James Temp. Including the three new buildings, 10 residence halls housing 600 students have been constructed since 1985 through the efforts of University Village Housing, Inc.

Mezzo-soprano Sarah Meredith of the music faculty wins a Fulbright grant to study and perform in West Germany during 1989-90.

SEPTEMBER
Singer-pianist Ray Charles and his orchestra open a new Visiting Artists Series at West High School. Broadway musicals, dance and chamber music concerts, a puppet troupe and a steel drum ensemble are also booked for the season.

The second Wednesday of the month is observed for the first time as an alcohol-free day in the Student Union and elsewhere on campus. The policy has been initiated by student government leaders.

Patrick Madden, Iron County circuit judge, receives the first Distinguished Alumni Award during the annual homecoming dinner of the Alumni Association. Madden is a magna cum laude graduate from the Class of 1971.

OCTOBER
Upon recommendation of the Student Union Policy Board, the main dining room is added to the list of designated no-smoking areas. Smoking is already banned in corridors, concourses, elevators and restrooms.

NOVEMBER
A bronze sculpture is unveiled at an arboretum entrance and a memorial plaque at the observation tower. "Doe With Fawns," the sculpture, is the gift of Dorothy Blair, who with her late husband, John, was an early benefactor of the University.

DECEMBER
The Community Sciences Building is rechristened John M. Rose Hall in recognition of Rose's work to bring a UW campus to the community.

Social Action Theatre becomes the first project of a new joint venture in noncredit programming by the Office of Outreach and UW-Oshkosh. Under the direction of Lou and Eugenia Erdmann of UW-Green Bay, the troupe will use drama to foster a more positive climate for cultural diversity in Northeastern Wisconsin.

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1990

FEBRUARY
Biologist Robert Howe is awarded a Fulbright grant to teach and conduct research in Australia. William Laatsch, professor of geography and regional analysis, is elected to head the state's Historic Preservation Review Board.

MARCH
Physicians, social workers and educators from the Soviet Union join UW-Green Bay faculty and community professionals for a symposium on alcohol abuse and its consequences.

The Phoenix men play to the "sweet 16" round of the National Invitational Tournament and finish the basketball season with a 24-8 record.

APRIL
Chancellor Outcalt announces the appointment of Chancellor Emeritus Weidner as project director for the performing arts center, and of Barbara Lindemann as assistant to the director.

Associate Chancellor Harden is named chairman of the board of Bellin Memorial Hospital. Harden has served on the board of directors since 1977.

MAY
Lectures, a panel discussion and screenings of a Jodie Foster film mark a campus observance of Sexual Assault Awareness Week.

Faculty anthropologist James Clifton publishes The Invented Indian: Cultural Fictions and Government Policy. It is the 11th book written or edited by Clifton.

JUNE
Educators, health and human services workers. clergy and other professionals gather at the University's first conference on the Hmong culture in Wisconsin.

A $25,000 pledge from Prange's department store brings the performing arts center campaign to seven-eighths of a $16 million goal for construction and endowment of operating expenses.

The Phoenix men make sports history as the first NCAA Division I basketball team to tour the Ukraine. The team returns from a 15-day trip with an 8-1 record against the republic's top college-age teams. Chancellor Outcalt, who has accompanied the team, brings back an agreement for the first student and faculty exchange with a Ukrainian University.

JULY
The Concert Choir, augmented by alumni and community singers, performs by invitation at the Graz American Music Festival in Austria. Accompanied by director Trinidad Chavez, the group winds up its stay with sightseeing in Salzburg and Vienna.

SEPTEMBER
Regent approval is granted for naming the proposed performing arts center in honor of Chancellor Emeritus Edward W. Weidner and designating the building's main auditorium as the Cofrin Family Hall.

DECEMBER
The UW-Green Bay library is named the David A. Cofrin Library during ceremonies attended by Cofrin and his wife Mary Ann, and a commemorative plaque is unveiled on the library plaza. Back to top

« APPENDIX

Chapters